Trucking Jobs New Driver Jobs Flatbed Jobs Tanker Jobs Refrigerated Jobs Auto Hauler Jobs
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1
    Light Load Member TheShadow's Avatar
    Member Since
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Anywhere, USA
    Trucker?
    Student
    Posts
    52
    Thanks
    110
    Thanked: 5 Times

    Spaceship Flatbed vs. Tanker vs. Dry Van vs. Car Carrier vs. Cement Truck vs. Refrigerated vs..

    Hi Forum,

    Which type of tractor-trailer load involves the least amount of physical labor? Flatbed? Tanker? Dry van? Refrigerated?

    Thanks.


  2. #2
    Medium Load Member
    Member Since
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Frost, TX
    Trucker?
    3 Years
    Posts
    623
    Thanks
    452
    Thanked: 136 Times
    I would guess dry van.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to russellkanning For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Road Train Member chompi's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Deland, FL
    Trucker?
    16 Years
    Age
    39
    Posts
    5,663
    Thanks
    1,446
    Thanked: 3,450 Times
    Probably Refrigerated.

    Flatbed requires strapping down your load and tarping. Tarps can weigh up to 250lbs and send you sailing if a good wind catches one! You must also constantly monitor your load and retighten your straps or chains as you drive.

    Tanker involves climbing around on the tank and pulling and hooking hoses. Not real labor intensive but the hoses can be heavy.

    Dry van depending on the load may require lots of work or no work at all. If you get a furniture load you will have to hand stack it all and possibly even wrap individual items. Also with a lot of loads you will have to build tiers with plywood and load bars. If you were to get like a paper load the truck would be loaded with a fork lift and you wouldn't have to touch anything. You can also get plant loads (big pain in the butt)!

    Reefer is almost 100% no touch. Everything is palletized and loaded with a forklift or some sort of pallet jack. Though you can build tiers it is highly unlikely. Reefer walls are smooth and not really meant for tier building.

    Flatbed, tanker and reefer will pay more than dry van.

    With running reefer you have twice the option of loads though. You can haul anything dry or refrigerated.

    Tanker you don't have to worry about backing into a dock.

    Flatbed there's no dock either but you may also have to deliver to construction sites which can sometimes be tricky.

    Reefers make noise and for some people this is an issue. You do have to monitor reefers but for the most part are pretty self sufficient. They do have their own fuel tanks in which you have to fill and keep track of.

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to chompi For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Light Load Member TheShadow's Avatar
    Member Since
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Anywhere, USA
    Trucker?
    Student
    Posts
    52
    Thanks
    110
    Thanked: 5 Times
    Thanks Chompi,

    If dry van work pays the least, which type pays the most?

  7. #5
    Road Train Member chompi's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Deland, FL
    Trucker?
    16 Years
    Age
    39
    Posts
    5,663
    Thanks
    1,446
    Thanked: 3,450 Times
    Man, there's a lot a variables in that equation. Reefer, flatbed and tanker all are at the higher end of the spectrum but it is going to depend on the company, what they haul, the individual run itself, the driver and their experience, what time of year it is, how much fuel cost etc...

    I can tell you one thing for sure, don't fall for the company that says they pay the highest or companies that boast $.48, $.50, $.52 etc... Just because they pay you more money a mile doesn't mean you actually make more. A company may pay you $.80 a mile but if you are sitting at a truck stop you aren't going to make squat! Usually the companies that boast higher pay are the ones that don't run any miles. Your biggest difference is going to be that the companies that run brand new nice equipment will probably pay a little less. The companies that run old equipment usually pay a little more. There is no big secret or one company that pays substantially more. Freight is freight and it all pays the same no matter what trailer it rides in or who delivers it. The type of freight itself will matter. Produce will pay more than toilet paper. It doesn't matter though if Swift hauls it or JB hunt.

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to chompi For This Useful Post:


  9. #6
    Medium Load Member gdyupgal's Avatar
    Member Since
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Montana/Watford City,ND
    Trucker?
    2 Years
    Age
    52
    Posts
    491
    Thanks
    822
    Thanked: 267 Times
    Tanker...

  10. #7
    Light Load Member FLORIDAHEAVYHAUL's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 2011
    Location
    High Springs, Florida
    Trucker?
    30 Years
    Age
    65
    Posts
    88
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked: 47 Times
    FOOD GRADE TANKER......one that does NOT have a pump.....Drove one of those for 2 years. BY FAR the easiest in terms of physical labor to load and unload. When loading and unloading a food grade tanker, the customer WANTS YOU NO WHERE NEAR THE PRODUCT. That way the pureness of the product is not compromised at all. All I ever did was drive, and consistent high miles. Never really had any short runs, with the possible exception every now and then for a milk haul. Those are usually the shortest runs, but I rarely ever did those. The one thing to ALWAYS remember when driving a smooth bore tanker.....THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS GOING TOO SLOW ON AN OFF RAMP. You can tip a smooth bore tanker REAL easy. Thats the biggest safety concern you will have. Personally, I would not drive a HAZMAT loaded tanker now days. Too many wack job potential terrorist out there. I have never driven a dry van or refer, but I have heard all the "bumpin a dock" horror stories that everyone else has. Flatbed and what I do now, and for the past 15 years, heavy haul, is a lot of work but I am not fat, and I enjoy the challenge. Good Luck (skill) no matter what you decide on.

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to FLORIDAHEAVYHAUL For This Useful Post:


  12. #8
    Road Train Member DrtyDiesel's Avatar
    Member Since
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Trucker?
    2 Years
    Age
    24
    Posts
    4,699
    Thanks
    5,994
    Thanked: 2,007 Times
    Quote Originally Posted by FLORIDAHEAVYHAUL View Post
    FOOD GRADE TANKER......one that does NOT have a pump.....Drove one of those for 2 years. BY FAR the easiest in terms of physical labor to load and unload. When loading and unloading a food grade tanker, the customer WANTS YOU NO WHERE NEAR THE PRODUCT. That way the pureness of the product is not compromised at all. All I ever did was drive, and consistent high miles. Never really had any short runs, with the possible exception every now and then for a milk haul. Those are usually the shortest runs, but I rarely ever did those. The one thing to ALWAYS remember when driving a smooth bore tanker.....THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS GOING TOO SLOW ON AN OFF RAMP. You can tip a smooth bore tanker REAL easy. Thats the biggest safety concern you will have. Personally, I would not drive a HAZMAT loaded tanker now days. Too many wack job potential terrorist out there. I have never driven a dry van or refer, but I have heard all the "bumpin a dock" horror stories that everyone else has. Flatbed and what I do now, and for the past 15 years, heavy haul, is a lot of work but I am not fat, and I enjoy the challenge. Good Luck (skill) no matter what you decide on.
    I love flatbed. I got into it to get experience to go to heavy haul. I live in Florida also, are you independent or do you work for a heavy haul company?

    Ethan

  13. #9
    Medium Load Member nicholas_jordan's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 2012
    Location
    temple texas
    Trucker?
    0-1 Year
    Posts
    609
    Thanks
    277
    Thanked: 100 Times
    My Truckers Blog
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by chompi View Post
    ..... Flatbed there's no dock either but you may also have to deliver to construction sites which can sometimes be tricky......
    I ran maybe half a dozen construction projects & though only one of them go into significant ($) I can tell you a few things about "how to do it" so that they are not so trick,...

    • watch for overhead "distribution" (9.6 kv electrical )
    • do not get the double axle drivers spinning or slipping on dry, soft dirt
    • do not back up unless you really know what is there
    • if any people around the truck appear in-experienced just flat wait till they back away about 20-35 feet
    • if you get cussed-out, that is not a big deal unless you were stupid
    • other than that just watch the load and make sure somebody signs
    • let them check it if they want to, ..... if they dont okay


    other than that it is only keeping a responsive watch-look and not letting anyone fluster you ~ if you get stuck there are usually tractors that can pull you out - but dont be stupid about it

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to nicholas_jordan For This Useful Post:


  15. #10
    Road Train Member DrtyDiesel's Avatar
    Member Since
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Trucker?
    2 Years
    Age
    24
    Posts
    4,699
    Thanks
    5,994
    Thanked: 2,007 Times
    Even though I pull flats I've had to bump a few docks next to dry van trailers. Since I was loaded with a forklift driving onto my trailer to drop pallets of coils.

    Ethan

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to DrtyDiesel For This Useful Post:


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •