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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by roman5566 View Post
    ...i would be driving for a small company, that is owned by a friend (4 trucks) and as far is i know the employer is the one that does the testing according to federal regulations.
    So what you're saying is you plan to slide past the regulations and get one over on DOT. Fantastic...



    DOT and now, in some cases, any police officer: local, county or state is allowed to search your truck for any or even no reason...just because he or she wants to. If you are found in possession of a "no-no" medication like methadone, you can be in some very hot water. If your friend knows about this situation and chose to place you in one of his or her trucks anyway, it could be the end of that small trucking company. CSA2010 is breathing hard down our necks as we speak. And it applies to everyone across the board.

    I have no idea what your situation is. All you say is you are on a maintenance methadone program and you are detoxing from the methadone. I can't make a proper suggestion regarding alternatives because I don't know whether you are on methadone to detox from something else or for a pain program...and if so, what kind of pain: chronic, joint inflamation, neurological...there are so many causes of pain and each one has to be treated in its own way. Without more information, I cannot help you.

    I will say that if the methadone is used to detox from something else, bite the bullet and check into an inpatient detox program to get it out of your system. Methadone and drugs like it are dangerous to stop "cold turkey" on your own after extended use.

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by roman5566 View Post
    well post your answer anyway i want to know as much as possible about the situation that i'm in. also i would be driving for a small company, that is owned by a friend (4 trucks) and as far is i know the employer is the one that does the testing according to federal regulations.
    Either; 1) your friend is not very smart, or 2) you're not much of a friend.


    1. He knows about your methadone and he's a fool to put you in a truck. If it can be shown he knew about this he is in a world of hurt.

    2. He doesn't know and you are putting his business at risk.

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  5. #33
    Bobtail Member ozzspeed's Avatar
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    Im curious after reading this thread now.. Its clear methadone is NOT allowed by the DOT and or Federal laws to obtain a cdl-a license in any and all states. So heres my question, as yes it does pertain to my personal situation..., If one realizes he or she cannot take methadone for pain mgnt and drive a truck for a living, what do you do then?? Heres my assumed answer to this,, I should have my doctor switch my med from methadone to something thats allowed for pain mgnt and to obtain a cdl.. Okay thats easy BUT say now that iv passed the cdl drug screen for dot and federal regs and its all clear LEGALLY, will a company dare hire someone thats taking a med for pain mgnt.. Iv not read any where on this site where someone is taking prescribed pain med and driving a company truck. Surely there are people out there driving that can chime in on this it would be appreciated..

  6. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by lostNfound View Post
    Either; 1) your friend is not very smart, or 2) you're not much of a friend.


    1. He knows about your methadone and he's a fool to put you in a truck. If it can be shown he knew about this he is in a world of hurt.

    2. He doesn't know and you are putting his business at risk.



    I was just about to say....

  7. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozzspeed View Post
    If one realizes he or she cannot take methadone for pain mgnt and drive a truck for a living, what do you do then?? Heres my assumed answer to this,, I should have my doctor switch my med from methadone to something thats allowed for pain mgnt and to obtain a cdl.. Okay thats easy BUT say now that iv passed the cdl drug screen for dot and federal regs and its all clear LEGALLY, will a company dare hire someone thats taking a med for pain mgnt..
    The answer is yes, a company can and often will hire someone currently on a pain maintenance program. I am on one myself and was hired into a company position initially even though my pain program at the time was much more aggressive than it is now. Since the pain has been reined in, so to speak, I do not require the heavy duty stuff I was taking before. At the time of my hire, I carried Vicodin, and regularly took Celebrex and ibuprofen. Today, my medications are Meloxicam and low-dosage bupropion (which I have been flamed on this site for in the past) and my pain is largely under control. I still have bad days. That's the way it is with degenerative arthritis. It's life. As said above, I bite the bullet, swallow a couple of ibuprofen and bull my way through the day.

    I hope this answers your question.

  8. #36
    Bobtail Member ozzspeed's Avatar
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    Injun thank you for the quick reply! Myself iv been dealing with pain mgnt for a few years and have tried the factory work here in my hometown but standing for 12 hours on concrete lifting 50-60 lb tubs of rubber just wasnt possible anymore. My situation is this: im prescribed methadone for pain mgnt. I understand the federal laws and am completely cool with that and have never intended on trying to find away around it illegally while taking methadone. So, in 3 days my i go see my dr to have my meds changed to something that is suitable with the federal dot regs so i can start school in a couple weeks for my cdl-a. I wanted this for yrs but financially havnt been able to go to school until now. Im not in chronic pain but the med def helps me cope when it gets gawd-awful . To cut this ramble short; (sorry) my main concern is changing my med goin thru with school and then finding no company will hire me simply because of the med that il be legally prescribed. Its my undestanding from the feds website that with a legal statement from my doctor stating my med will not affect my driving and is safe, i should be ok. again Injun thanks alot for the reply. I feel better about it.

  9. #37
    Road Train Member Rerun8963's Avatar
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    Methadone FAQ

    What is Methadone?

    Methadone, an opiate derivative, is a medication that is often used as a substitute for other opiate narcotics, such as heroin, that a patient may be addicted to.

    and this

    Other opium derivatives prescribed for moderate to severe pain and sometimes abused include: hydromorphone (Dilaudid), meperidine (Demerol), oxycodone (Percodan, Percocet), and hydrocodone (Vicodin, Lortab, Lorcet).
    Methadone, a synthetic used mainly in the treatment of heroin addiction, is often abused and responsible for a number of overdose deaths.


    __________________________________________________ _


    your driving days are over...........

  10. #38
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    Again, it depends on what the cause of the pain is. Mine is caused by a type of arthritis that keeps the joint inflamed and flakes away the joint linings. Therefore, a long-term anti-inflamatory is appropriate. Mine is used in conjunction with a low-dose antidepressant to initially jolt the brain out of the pain cycle and then to prevent that cycle from starting again. In other words, to close the door to the "pain pathway" and put a door stop in after. Overall, it works well for me. There are still times when it gets out of control, but those times are far less frequent and last for less time. Generally, I can get away with a supplimental analgesic and some light duty.

    I understand there are some kinds of pain that are quite severe. Having been in the position of treating the pain with Vicodin and not treating the cause, I very nearly ended up a Vic junkie. You have to go after the cause and try everything you can to get away from those high-powered analgesics. Opiates and opioids are effective, but have been shown through numerous studies to cause judgment lapses, decreased reaction times, depressed bodily function and heavy addiction. They are fantastic for short-term treatmet for severe pain and for those who are waiting to die. If you plan to live--really live--find the cause and chase it down.

    There is no part of life that is completely pain free. It's part of how we know we're alive. For those of us with stuff going on, we find alternative ways to deal with it. Sweat lodge works for me. You will find your way. But your mind has to be clear so you will recognize it when you find it.

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  12. #39
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    the federal statues does NOT specifically apply to the MMT (methadone maintenance treatment) patients. i went to an attorney's office and asked for his interpretation. even though it says methadone is habit forming and may not be used by truck driver.

    well it does not specify whether you abuse (get high on it) or are on MMT ( which does NOT give you a high) infact metadone goes to your spine and STOPS/PREVENTS the effects of opiates... that's why it's considered much safer than vicodone, and illicit drugs. anyways if you read a little more about it you will find that methadone is the most researched/tested/evaluated drug in american history.

    to poster who said "if you drive on methadone you might as well drive on morphine"... alll i can say you have no clue what youre talking about. when someone is on MMT they are on a dose that will block withdrawl symptoms for 24 hours as methadone is a long lasting opioid...so buddy there is a HUGE difference if i drove on morphine compared to methadone

  13. #40
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    Methadone is a rigorously well-tested medication that is safe and efficacious for the treatment of narcotic withdrawal and dependence. For more than 30 years this synthetic narcotic has been used to treat opioid addiction. Heroin releases an excess of dopamine in the body and causes users to need an opiate continuously occupying the opioid receptor in the brain. Methadone occupies this receptor and is the stabilizing factor that permits addicts on methadone to change their behavior and to discontinue heroin use.

    Taken orally once a day, methadone suppresses narcotic withdrawal for between 24 and 36 hours. Because methadone is effective in eliminating withdrawal symptoms, it is used in detoxifying opiate addicts. It is, however, only effective in cases of addiction to heroin, morphine, and other opioid drugs, and it is not an effective treatment for other drugs of abuse. Methadone reduces the cravings associated with heroin use and blocks the high from heroin, but it does not provide the euphoric rush. Consequently, methadone patients do not experience the extreme highs and lows that result from the waxing and waning of heroin in blood levels. Ultimately, the patient remains physically dependent on the opioid, but is freed from the uncontrolled, compulsive, and disruptive behavior seen in heroin addicts.

    Withdrawal from methadone is much slower than that from heroin. As a result, it is possible to maintain an addict on methadone without harsh side effects. Many MMT patients require continuous treatment, sometimes over a period of years.

    Methadone maintenance treatment provides the heroin addict with individualized health care and medically prescribed methadone to relieve withdrawal symptoms, reduces the opiate craving, and brings about a biochemical balance in the body. Important elements in heroin treatment include comprehensive social and rehabilitation services.

    Availability of Treatment

    About 20% of the estimated 810,000 heroin addicts in the United States receive MMT (American Methadone Treatment Association, 1999). At present, the operating practices of clinics and hospitals are bound by Federal regulations that restrict the use and availability of methadone. These regulations are explicitly stated in detailed protocols established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Additionally, most States have laws that control and closely monitor the distribution of this medication.

    In July 1999 the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for the use of methadone. For the first time in more than 30 years, the NPRM proposes that this medication take its rightful place as a clinical tool in the treatment of the heroin addict. Instead of its use being mandated by regulations, programs will establish quality assurance guidelines and have to be accredited. The proposed new system will allow greater flexibility by the treating physician and ensure appropriate clinical management of the patient's needs. This proposed change in policy would eliminate most of the current regulations and allow greater clinical discretion for treatment by the physician. Accreditation establishes a clinical standard of care for the treatment of medical conditions. In the foreseeable future, clinic and hospital programs would be accredited by a national and/or State accrediting body. Responsibility for preventing the diversion of methadone to illicit use will remain with the Drug Enforcement Administration.

    Is It Safe?

    Like any controlled substance, there is a risk of abuse. When used as prescribed and under a physician's care, research and clinical studies suggest that long-term MMT is medically safe (COMPA, 1997). When methadone is taken under medical supervision, long-term maintenance causes no adverse effects to the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, bones, blood, brain, or other vital body organs. Methadone produces no serious side effects, although some patients experience minor symptoms such as constipation, water retention, drowsiness, skin rash, excessive sweating, and changes in libido. Once methadone dosage is adjusted and stabilized or tolerance increases, these symptoms usually subside.

    Methadone is a legal medication produced by licensed and approved pharmaceutical companies using quality control standards. Under a physician's supervision, it is administered orally on a daily basis with strict program conditions and guidelines. Methadone does not impair cognitive functions. It has no adverse effects on mental capability, intelligence, or employability. It is not sedating or intoxicating, nor does it interfere with ordinary activities such as driving a car or operating machinery. Patients are able to feel pain and experience emotional reactions. Most importantly, methadone relieves the craving associated with opiate addiction. For methadone patients, typical street doses of heroin are ineffective at producing euphoria, making the use of heroin less desirable.

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