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  1. #1
    Bobtail Member
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    Strikes of 1974 and 1979

    I heard that there were strikes around the 70's. Minor and Big Ones. Does anyone know about that or has something they could share (pictures,clips,articles,rigs,information) please?I would love to learn about these strikes.


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    Road Train Member heyns57's Avatar
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    1970

    I think you have asked this question on other forums, but here we go again. In 1970, Chicago locals wanted their usual nickel more than the recently settled National Master Freight Agreement. Their strike lasted about three months and affected terminals throughout the Midwest because Chicago was a hub for many LTL carriers. Freight was smuggled into Chicago in school buses. Roving pickets using CB radio could pounce on strike breakers without patrolling terminal gates. To the best of my knowledge, Chicago drivers got their nickel.

    Also in 1970, teamster company drivers at Tri-State Motor Transit went on strike for "third dispatch and home". A non-union leased driver was killed when a rifle shot caused his load of blasting caps to explode at Springfield, MO. The teamsters lost that strike and the reincarnation of the company is non-union today.

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    Bobtail Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by heyns57 View Post
    I think you have asked this question on other forums, but here we go again. In 1970, Chicago locals wanted their usual nickel more than the recently settled National Master Freight Agreement. Their strike lasted about three months and affected terminals throughout the Midwest because Chicago was a hub for many LTL carriers. Freight was smuggled into Chicago in school buses. Roving pickets using CB radio could pounce on strike breakers without patrolling terminal gates. To the best of my knowledge, Chicago drivers got their nickel.

    Also in 1970, teamster company drivers at Tri-State Motor Transit went on strike for "third dispatch and home". A non-union leased driver was killed when a rifle shot caused his load of blasting caps to explode at Springfield, MO. The teamsters lost that strike and the reincarnation of the company is non-union today.
    I don't remember asking these questions on other forums sir.

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    Road Train Member heyns57's Avatar
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    Questions are what make these forums live, Seventiesman. I meant no disrespect.

    It must be a coincidence that a young man calling himself "Seventiestrucker" asked the same questions on Hank's in a thread titled "1974". Most of the answers pertained to the highway blockages in response to the fuel crises.

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    Road Train Member Cybergal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heyns57 View Post
    Questions are what make these forums live, Seventiesman. I meant no disrespect.

    It must be a coincidence that a young man calling himself "Seventiestrucker" asked the same questions on Hank's in a thread titled "1974". Most of the answers pertained to the highway blockages in response to the fuel crises.
    THANK YOU we have a couple other members from there as well, AS we knew this all along....

    We ask you give this BOARD the RESPECT it deserves. If you cannot do that..then please go back to HANKS!

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    I can't give you any specifics about the strikes of the 70's because I was a wee little thing. I do recall waiting for days for my dad to get home after he was attacked at a rest area by some truckers who were on strike. My dad was not a member of the unions. What little I remember of the ordeal left a bad taste in my mouth for unions that has lasted to this day. They may very well be good for some things but when they start attacking those who can't strike because they need to work, then they are just wrong.

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    Trucker Forum STAFF GuysLady's Avatar
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    I recall one, when I was about 6 or 7. That would make it '78 or '79.

    My father worked in a citrus plant as the night shipper. I can remember eating so many oranges that I was SICK of them. There was simply no way to ship them. The growers were bringing them in from the fields in the back of old pick up trucks. But there was no way to get them out before they rotted, so they sent them home with employees.

    Other than that, I remember Dad saying the drivers got their point across.

    Bonnie

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    "Tipster" Tip's Avatar
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    I remember the Missouri thing

    The explosion that happened in Missouri seems like yesterday. I remember hearing about that on the news in Virginia.

    Of course, all this was back when unions had a lot more power and trucking was regulated. Actually, I can't say it "was" regulated, as it's regulated NOW, just socially.

    Ahh, the good ol' days in trucking. I don't care if you did have to drive a cab-over Mack. Those were good days to make good money, and a cup of coffee was free. A cup of ice today will run you two bucks. I'm surprised the truckstops don't have pay toilets.

  9. #9
    Road Train Member heyns57's Avatar
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    Tip said: "Of course, all this was back when unions had a lot more power and trucking was regulated. Actually, I can't say it "was" regulated, as it's regulated NOW, just socially."

    The unions did have more power when the trucking industry was economically regulated. Prior to 1980, the government controlled entry into the trucking business and protected the existing companies as "quasi public utilities". Competition with rates, routes or commodities was controlled. If a company needed a rate increase because of an expensive new union agreement, the government granted it to keep the company profitable and able to operate safely.

  10. #10
    "Tipster" Tip's Avatar
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    And it's regulated today, only differently

    For a little while, the trucking industry was deregulated. Deregulation started in 1980, and lasted until the advent of the CDL. The CDL was part of a whole new batch of social regulations designed to put collars on drivers. I think DAC came along about the same time the CDL did, as did drug testing. Or were these put in place just before the CDL? Not 100% sure. I know DAC isn't a government entity, but you're ruled by it just the same, so it may as well be. Also, did drivers always have to give a 10-year work history when applying for trucking jobs? Maybe in the pre-deregulation days, one didn't have to apply for a job. He knew somebody who'd train him, got his chauffer's license, and got a job that way.

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