In state CDL not for hire questions

Discussion in 'Trucking Industry Regulations' started by GMCBrigadier, Feb 20, 2011.

  1. GMCBrigadier

    GMCBrigadier Bobtail Member

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    Hi, I am from Kansas and grew up driving tandoms and grain semis on the farm, of course staying within 100miles and hauling your own grain we didn't have issues with DOT or any of that. Although I still am a farmer I am getting into showing horses, antique car shows and threshing bees and would like to take some of my toys to show off. I found this site researching toyhaulers and some guy who posted about wanting to do it commercially but I just want to haul my own stuff to shows. I was at an auction Monday here and a guy had a 98 Volvo single axle he had "private RV" painted on the door and he was a rodeo cowboy who drove several states pulling a gooseneck horsetrailer and had no CDL or DOT numbers and tagged the truck at 26M. This confused me because I thought when they added the trailer tag wt on that would push it over the limit but since few people tag horse trailers if they are farmers I have no idea how that would work anyway- I think if you were a rodeo cowboy you probably should tag them. So do I need a CDL and DOT stuff to take my own private stuff for display at antique or horse shows if I am under 26K? Of course most tractors will have a GVW of well over that but the guy at the auction swore KDOT told him it all depended on how it was tagged. I am really confused and when I try calling the state I get the run around. Thanks
     
  2. turnanburn

    turnanburn Medium Load Member

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    Farmers doing actual farming have certain CDL and CMV exemptions. They aren't that easy to get a full explanation/understanding of, but they are in place. Just remember that car shows aren't farming, and once these vehicles do non-farm work you have crossed over the line. You need to find someone in your state's DMV or DOT to sit down with and get the specifics. There's a lot of variables with what you are doing. Get your answers from the horse's mouth.
     
  3. witchwaywest

    witchwaywest Medium Load Member

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    GMC,Do a search for Kansas Corporation Commission(KCC).Once there look at the sidebar.You'll see a box that says "Truckin' Through Kansas Handbook".It's a PDF.About page 10 as you scroll down.Rather large but it'll give you info about what Kansas describes it's vehicle classifications as and alot of other info.Another state agency(like you don't have enough)is the Kansas Dept. of Revenue.Check these two out before KDOT.





    Admin.state/gov sites
     
  4. osokusmc

    osokusmc Light Load Member

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    I was running on farm tags, no DOT#, no CDL, no medical card, no drug/alcohol program (never heard of one), within 100 mile of home, running empty on my way to pick up a load of calves I'd bought out of state, in a class 8 with triple axle cattle pot. I pulled into a scale just across the state line and was cited for no DOT# and no medical card, the truck passed inspection, no mention was made of a drug/alcohol program. I was told that if I crossed a state line, even if private not for hire, that I was engaged in interstate commerce and therefore subject to all that entails.

    When I got home, I applied for a DOT#, and got my medical card. About eight months later I get the bright idea to get my CDL and pro-rate my truck so I can pick up some outside work moving cattle. I jumped through all the hoops and paid all the money to get started. Next thing I get a call scheduling a new entrant DOT audit. I failed the audit based on the fact that I wasn't in a drug/alcohol program when I got caught at the scale the previous year. I argued to no avail that at the time I was private not for hire and that I was in compliance before I started hauling commercially. USDOT told me it doesn't matter what kind of farm exemptions each state has, once you cross a state line you are under their jurisdiction.