What are your experiences with H2S?

Discussion in 'Oilfield Trucking Forum' started by MP3 > CB, Oct 18, 2013.

  1. MP3 > CB

    MP3 > CB Medium Load Member

    Messages:
    366
    Thanks Received:
    67
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2011
    Location:
    Sawyer, MI
    BA in economics, actually. Even though you want to get snotty defending an entitlement mentality, I appreciate your contribution. But yes, even wages in dangerous jobs are set by the market in non-socialist economies.
     
  2. MP3 > CB

    MP3 > CB Medium Load Member

    Messages:
    366
    Thanks Received:
    67
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2011
    Location:
    Sawyer, MI
    That vapor recovery system is what they didn't have in the Youtube video I posted about the crude hauler who got hit by H2S. Engineering control. I'll look for that tomorrow when I start training.

    I hope they're as cautious about H2S in North Dakota but I doubt it. I'm curious in which fields the most H2S is found. Sounds like S. Texas is better than West Texas.
     
  3. MP3 > CB

    MP3 > CB Medium Load Member

    Messages:
    366
    Thanks Received:
    67
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2011
    Location:
    Sawyer, MI
    Thus, the Darwin Award. I feel for the guy, but man! He gets sick and walks away. He goes back and gets more sick. Then he comes back after the weekend and gets still sicker. Hello?
     
  4. Adam121

    Adam121 Bobtail Member

    Messages:
    26
    Thanks Received:
    5
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2013
    Not so much snotty as giving you a gentle ribbing. Believe me, most of the people who do these jobs for cheap aren't told about all the dangers or that you can end up blinded by corrosive agents, with lung disease or dead. And seriously, if you have a BA, what are you doing hauling sand? Saving us from the evils of socialism?

    Just be safe, that silica dust gets in your lungs like asbestos. OSHA is supposed to be passing some regulations about it, I heard.
     
  5. Porkchop1980

    Porkchop1980 Bobtail Member

    Messages:
    15
    Thanks Received:
    6
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2013
    Location:
    Watford City ND
    H2s wells up here in ND are a hit and miss. What I mean is you can have multiple wells side by side one will produce H2s and the one right next to it wont. Most companies take the threat of H2s very seriously and provide all the proper equipment to monitor and protect you from exposer. Accidents will happen. I have been working the ND oil fields for a couple of years now and I have had a few run ins with H2s but with all the training I have received it has been nothing that I couldn't handle.
     
  6. J Man

    J Man Light Load Member

    Messages:
    157
    Thanks Received:
    44
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2011
    Location:
    Middle of nowhere
    I ran into the stuff a few times pulling production water when gauging tanks or the exhaust on my pump while loading. Ran into it at old, stagnant pits too. There were a few locations that we knew always had H2S on them. Spoke to a driver and he said if it was under 100 on the meter they would drive onto the location and see, but over that they sent in crews to clean the location back up (it set down in a deep valley and was just a hot spot for that gas). I wouldn't mess with anything that high. Meter tripped up to 50 a couple times on top of tanks while they vented but the wind blew it away. I was told when I started for the first company that 10ppm was OK to load in and 20ppm was when you needed to get out, but they didn't seem very serious about it. Every company I dealt with after that one told us to get out if the meter detected anything at all and they would deal with it, no messing around. I liked that better.
     
  7. MP3 > CB

    MP3 > CB Medium Load Member

    Messages:
    366
    Thanks Received:
    67
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2011
    Location:
    Sawyer, MI
    I once sat waiting in the shop talking to a driver who had been a vice president and also a plant manager. I just went through orientation with a former Harrier pilot and Company Commander. We started talking politics with a really smart guy who had been in IT. You never know what someone did before driving a truck.

    I once met a guy from Eastern Europe, I forget where, and man was he bitter at the companies he'd leased on to. He kept talking about how they were out to screw us and how all of our wages should be just so high. He was just bitter.

    I don't see the companies doing too much different from any of the rest of us, they try to maximize profit by getting high rates and lower costs. Costs in that sentence includes our wages, labor costs. It's natural, it's the way it should be.

    Of course there will be cheap companies where the owner is trying to get out as much as he can now without regard to the long term. He plans on selling or getting out altogether and he doesn't care what kind of condition he leaves the company in- old equipment, high turnover, etc., etc. Stay away from a company like that. But, the freedom to run your business the way you like means you can do that. Then, we have agencies like OSHA to penalize them if they are endangering people. But, buyer beware, OSHA won't catch it all. And, if there is a better company and a better job down the road, try to get in there.

    This H2S sounds crazy. My solace is two 80,000 lb trucks passing each other in opposite directions at 60 mph just inches apart is probably even crazier. Too late to back out now. I thought leaving frac sand would get me away from the threat of silicosis.
     
  8. Soulatude

    Soulatude Bobtail Member

    Messages:
    8
    Thanks Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Location:
    TX
    I have pulled from many times from wells with 2000-6000ppm of H2S. Make sure your meter is working. Use the vapor recovery line! Watch for wind conditions and stand up wind. There are usually tons of signs around when you are on a High H2S pad. respect it and you'll be ok.
     
    d o g and MP3 > CB Thank this.
Draft saved Draft deleted