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  1. #11
    Bobtail Member
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    That is so true the different regs. The oil/gasfield industry is in a league of their own and you have to be VERY CAREFUL with what you do and say. I learned the hard way.

  2. #12
    Bobtail Member
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    Thanks Bear and Notarps! I appreciate the information you have both provided. This website has helped me more than I could have imagined when I first logged onto it. I still have time to figure things out inregards to the gas industry out here, but I am looking into other driving areas as well. Thanks again

  3. #13
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    Your welcome! Good luck.

  4. #14
    Bobtail Member
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    Oil field inquiry

    You are so welcome. That industry pays good but some things that happen are not worth what you have to give up.
    If I can be of further assistance let me know.
    Bear

  5. #15
    Bobtail Member
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    The Oil field industry is going strong in Western Oklahoma (Elk City). Look on Career Builder for Plains Marketing. They have openings in Oklahoma and Texas.

  6. #16
    Bobtail Member
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    working in the oil and gas transportation fields are not for the faint of heart. You better not mind throwing iron, even in the summer. Now I work in Colorodo, Utah, and Wyoming fields. Things are much different here. If you are just getting out of school please do not come up here. Get your experience in mountains and bad weather on pavement before you come try this. I hate it when someone dies up on one of these mountains.

  7. #17
    Bobtail Member
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    drove the water trucks from the gas wells here in arkansas, be ready to drive that truck like a honda forman four wheeler. you will take a big truck where it is not designed to go. it's really kinda koolllll

  8. #18
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    ya right. home time in the oilfield. Here is how my oilfield job works and most all around here are almost the same.
    you are on call 24 hours a day for 10 days and you have two days off. BUT if you are on a job when your two days comes up yu don't get to leave the job. r
    the phne rings all hours of the night. You may work 15 hours, get home, take a shower, lay down and the phone is ringing before your head hits the pillow.
    the oilfield don't give a rats rear fr your fmcr rules even the few that apply to them.
    I work betwen 80 and 120+ hours a week. last week I started monday mornign and worked straight through for 48 hours with no sleep, driving the whole time. Wednesday I did 14 hours, thursday I started at 4am and got off Saturday at 10:30pm. I slept 6 hours thurday night (only got that much because I blew out a tire and airbag because I was running 100k pounds) and I stopped for 4 hours friday night so mabey got 3.5hr sleep. wasn't a bad week 105hrs, i've had many more hours before. Of course then you get some times like the last week weeks with all the hurricans I only worked 3 days in three weeks. when you are sent to a rig you wrk for that rig man untill he releases you. He may tell you to park on the side and wait untill he tells you to unload. It could be 7 minutes or 7 days.... And it happens ALL the time. we have plenty of 168hr weeks.

  9. #19
    Banned or Retired
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    Quote Originally Posted by MedicineMan View Post
    ya right. home time in the oilfield. Here is how my oilfield job works and most all around here are almost the same.
    you are on call 24 hours a day for 10 days and you have two days off. BUT if you are on a job when your two days comes up yu don't get to leave the job. r
    the phne rings all hours of the night. You may work 15 hours, get home, take a shower, lay down and the phone is ringing before your head hits the pillow.
    the oilfield don't give a rats rear fr your fmcr rules even the few that apply to them.
    I work betwen 80 and 120+ hours a week. last week I started monday mornign and worked straight through for 48 hours with no sleep, driving the whole time. Wednesday I did 14 hours, thursday I started at 4am and got off Saturday at 10:30pm. I slept 6 hours thurday night (only got that much because I blew out a tire and airbag because I was running 100k pounds) and I stopped for 4 hours friday night so mabey got 3.5hr sleep. wasn't a bad week 105hrs, i've had many more hours before. Of course then you get some times like the last week weeks with all the hurricans I only worked 3 days in three weeks. when you are sent to a rig you wrk for that rig man untill he releases you. He may tell you to park on the side and wait untill he tells you to unload. It could be 7 minutes or 7 days.... And it happens ALL the time. we have plenty of 168hr weeks.
    Lightweight!





    Yeah, pretty much what he said. I've worked for a couple oilfield service companies over the years. In fact, that was where I got my CDL, although getting it was just a by-product of the job.

    When I worked in my home country I worked 21 days on and 7 off, IIRC. I also worked international on a 28/28. The key word is worked ... if not out in the field on a job we were expected to put in a full 10-12 hours in the shop every single day of the 21 or 28 we were on-duty. Well-site jobs were over and above that as we were on-call 24/7 for our on-duty rotation. It was nothing to have put in a full day, just get home and have the phone ring saying I had to be on a nitrogen frac at 06:00 the next morning (which meant I had to make a 10-hour round-trip to load nitrogen). That left me about 15 minutes to s@&!, shower and shave, and cover my meal times in-transit.

    Up here, spring break-up was really hectic as companies were trying to get their wells finished and the rigs moved before the road bans went on. During this time it wasn't uncommon to do 4-5 jobs in a row (with no breaks), with each job being anywhere from 6-12 hours in length ... assuming there were no problems. Of course, it might take 8 hours just to drag the equipment into the well site at the end of a Cat line. -40 in the winter, swarmed by mosquitos and black flies in the summer, up to our #$$ in mud in the spring and fall. And the yelling, always someone yelling.

    All of this was before we were required to run logs up here so you can imagine the potential for carnage. There were many, many times when I would wake up at some remote fuel cardlock with my doors open and the nozzles in the tank and wonder, "How the heck did I get here?" (no co-driver )

    Having said all that ... #### I loved it! For a while anyhow. I was 20 years old and at any one time I was in charge of a crew of 4-8 guys, responsible for $3-4 million in equipment (probably triple that, or more, now), doing an $800,000 job on a well that just cost $5 million to complete and if I screwed up... When I went overseas at 23 the numbers went up exponentially. And I barely passed grade 12. Heady days indeed! Wild and wooly doesn't even begin to describe the atmosphere.

    The coin was pretty good too (I never worked out my hourly wage though ) We were paid a monthly base-rate augmented by job bonuses, hauling bonuses, blending bonuses, etc.

    Honestly, given the environment, I am really surprised there weren't a lot more fatalities ... including my own (although I came close many times ... but that's for another thread ).

  10. #20
    Medium Load Member telcobilly's Avatar
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    All of this oilfield talk brings back very recent memories for me. I was a surveyor and for a brief stint, a trainee directional driller. Those were pretty easy jobs compared to the rig jobs. Longs hours with no sleep, quick turnarounds and no scheduled days off.
    I'm currently unemployed in SoCal and really need to get back to work! All I'm finding are penny-ante jobs despite my 23 years of telecom and 1.5 years in a technical oilfield job.
    I'm looking hard at trucking as a stable career, even if I don't get rich doing it. I'm looking at going to school and would like to run local after paying my dues.
    On this site to learn as much as I can..

    Bill

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