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  1. #1
    Light Load Member haystack's Avatar
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    USA air weigh on board scales

    Ok, here is the deal, looking for a set of air weigh scales. I dont care if it is a wireless system, or hardwired system. I just want some way to check my weight while loading. When the scales house starting diggin so hard to get an axle ticket that they split a tandem weight,ie. one drive on, one drive off, its time for me to make sure that I am right, and not give them a reason to pull me in.

    There are many different kinds of systems out there: Air-Weigh, TruckWeight, TelTek load weight gauge.

    I have not seen any post on pros/cons of any brand and am looking for any helpful info. Which one to look at/stay away from this one type deal.



    Thanks for any input
    Last edited by haystack; 05.03.2009 at 12.26 AM.

  2. #2
    "Village Idiot" dancnoone's Avatar
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    They all work pretty much the same. We use a factory set-up (KW). But it doesn't offer "per" axle weights. Just a tandem weight, and the trailers work the same.

    Someone else will have to give you a reliablity report on others.

    Ohio used to do the split your drives thing. What a royal pain in the ###. And, it does appear to be making a come back in other states. I fully expect to see strict enforcement of front axle weights in the near future.

    Somebody, somewhere, will decide that 12k is the limit, regardless of axle and tire ratings.

  3. #3
    Light Load Member haystack's Avatar
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    good grief, yall are just 'johnny on the spot' I dint even have time to fix my fubu, by making 2 posts.
    Thanks for the input, I have a pretty good idea how they work, all that they do is convert air PSI to a usable number in pounds/kilo. What I was wondering is, what kind is better, or more user friendly.
    Is there anyone out there that uses them? I am dragging a hopper now, and it isnt feasible for me to scale every load at a truck stop. I would be willing to pay an overweight ticket or 2 to be able to load the correct weight the first time.
    I am not overly concerned about the steer weight, I have that controlled by 5th wheel position.
    I am considering 4 TelTek gauges, one per axle since I do have a spread, guess I could sneak by with just 3 though, one for the drives and one on each trailer.
    Thanks guys.
    Last edited by haystack; 05.03.2009 at 12.42 AM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by danc694u View Post
    They all work pretty much the same. We use a factory set-up (KW). But it doesn't offer "per" axle weights. Just a tandem weight, and the trailers work the same.

    Someone else will have to give you a reliablity report on others.

    Ohio used to do the split your drives thing. What a royal pain in the ###. And, it does appear to be making a come back in other states. I fully expect to see strict enforcement of front axle weights in the near future.

    Somebody, somewhere, will decide that 12k is the limit, regardless of axle and tire ratings.
    Years ago I got nailed for an over-weight by an L.A.P.D. Knevil....
    Not for over-weight on the axles mind you...the load rating on the tires..... The company had to eat that one....

  5. #5
    Road Train Member pullingtrucker's Avatar
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    Instead of paying all the extra money for the weighing systems just buy some liquid filled pressure gauges. This way you can put them on all axles and all ya need is a T fitting, the gauge, and maybe some plastic line and a a couple more fittings depending on where you want to mount them. I have installed this type of setup on all my trucks and trailers. For that matter this is the type of set up all the iron haulers use up here. But we don't put them on every axle. The reasoning is that the drivers are feed off of one leveling valve and the same goes for the spread on the trailer. But if you feel more comfortable going with a gauge on every axle go ahead...you won't see much difference in weight.

    With this setup all you need to do to calibrate is load something and put your ride on a CAT scale or some other scale that is corret. Record the PSI on the gauge and divide the axle weight by the PSI. This will give you the weight per PSI. Then everytime ya load just multiply the PSI by the weight per PSI and theres your axle weight. I swapped between four different trailers with this setup so I kept a note pad with each trailers weight per PSI and PSI at 34,000 lbs. (tandem axle) and 40,000 lbs. (spread axle). The only thing you will need to know with any suspension weighing system is that once you are loaded you will need the air pressure all the way up and then move the truck forward or backwards about 20-40 feet. This allows the suspension to move and adjust all will give you the most accurate weight.

  6. #6
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    USA

    Quote Originally Posted by pullingtrucker View Post
    Instead of paying all the extra money for the weighing systems just buy some liquid filled pressure gauges. This way you can put them on all axles and all ya need is a T fitting, the gauge, and maybe some plastic line and a a couple more fittings depending on where you want to mount them. I have installed this type of setup on all my trucks and trailers. For that matter this is the type of set up all the iron haulers use up here. But we don't put them on every axle. The reasoning is that the drivers are feed off of one leveling valve and the same goes for the spread on the trailer. But if you feel more comfortable going with a gauge on every axle go ahead...you won't see much difference in weight.

    With this setup all you need to do to calibrate is load something and put your ride on a CAT scale or some other scale that is corret. Record the PSI on the gauge and divide the axle weight by the PSI. This will give you the weight per PSI. Then everytime ya load just multiply the PSI by the weight per PSI and theres your axle weight. I swapped between four different trailers with this setup so I kept a note pad with each trailers weight per PSI and PSI at 34,000 lbs. (tandem axle) and 40,000 lbs. (spread axle). The only thing you will need to know with any suspension weighing system is that once you are loaded you will need the air pressure all the way up and then move the truck forward or backwards about 20-40 feet. This allows the suspension to move and adjust all will give you the most accurate weight.
    Just as Pullingtrucker said................

  7. #7
    Light Load Member haystack's Avatar
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    Thats what I have been doing, there are gauges on the trailer, and the suspension gauge on the tractor. My biggest problem in doing that is, my load isnt strapped down, so it moves around in the tank abit especially with stupid people driving 4 wheelers so I usually end up with too much on my drives after a brake check. Since I get paid by the ton, its not cost effective for me to load 26T in the event that I do move 2K lbs forward. The gauges are only broken up into 5lb increments with about half an inch between tick marks, I can get pretty close, but close only counts in hand grenades and horse shoes.

  8. #8
    Light Load Member haystack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron-MARS Trucking View Post
    Years ago I got nailed for an over-weight by an L.A.P.D. Knevil....
    Not for over-weight on the axles mind you...the load rating on the tires..... The company had to eat that one....

    Ron,
    A TX DOT boy tryed that crap with me a few years ago also, luckily I had 16ply Continentals for steers and I just squeeked by. He was sitting in the pickup writing up the ticket, and he got out, walked up to the truck, licked his finger, wiped off the weight rating on the tire, and then walked back. I questioned him what he was doing, and he flat out said 'I was trying to shut you down and make you change your steer tires.' So if yall ever have to run Hwy 60 East of Amarillo, watch out for him.

  9. #9
    Medium Load Member 24valve puller's Avatar
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    Ditto what pulling trucker said. it will save you alot of money over those fancy sets. All they do is change the psi into lbs, you should be able to get 2 guages, fittings, plastic line and run to the cat scale a couple of times to get the max psi on each guage noted for under $100. I don't know if there is any difference between the drive axles but the lead axle on my spread is always about 300-400 lbs heavier

  10. #10
    "Family Man" 7mouths2feed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by black_dog106 View Post
    Just as Pullingtrucker said................
    One guage for the front and one for both rears or should there be one for each rear? Tractor only

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