2 Year Old Genius Girl - On Par w/Stephen Hawking!

Discussion in 'Other News' started by WiseOne, Jun 23, 2007.

  1. WiseOne

    WiseOne Inactive contact bullhaulerswife

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    [ Her parents knew Georgia Brown was bright. After all, she could count to ten, recognised her colours and was even starting to dabble with French. But it was only when their bubbly little two-year-old took an IQ test that her towering intellect was confirmed. Georgia has become the youngest female member of Mensa after scoring a genius-rated IQ of 152. ]

    Read More Here >> Daily Mail

    :biggrin_2551:
     
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  3. whispers65233

    whispers65233 Medium Load Member

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    WOW just think when she is around 10 she will have to come down to her parents intelligence level to hold a conversation! :biggrin_2559: Just kidding. I just hope she isn't pressured into growing up too fast and not enjoy being a child. I hate to see her burnt out at 12.
     
  4. WiseOne

    WiseOne Inactive contact bullhaulerswife

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    Yea, me too, but I tell ya, just think when she gets to be like 20...WOW. I hope they raise her right. I have been accused of being a genius myself, but I spurn Mensa as I don't have the time, LOL.
     
  5. 25(2)+2

    25(2)+2 Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    The picture of her bears an uncanny resemblance to one of my wife when she was two. I was thinking she will know everything at 8 or 9, too young to hire for teenage jobs. I hope she does as well as she can at everything.

    I have a grand daughter speaking in complete sentences at 19 months. Her dad tested 165 in HS.
     
  6. Ducks

    Ducks "Token Four-Wheeler"

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    My 21 year-old son had been tested a few times in first grade, and his IQ is above this girl's... well into the "genius" range from what we've been told, too.

    While I am sometimes in awe of the depth of his knowledge and his ability to grasp and apply more complex concepts into everyday life, I have to admit that it wasn't an easy journey. It can be a real struggle for a child who sees the world differently than his/her peers... <sigh>

    The parents are probably thrilled right now by their little girl, as they should be... but chances are, they will experience many problems similar to those of other special needs children.... and twenty years from now, they'll be exhausted. I am. And it is only in the past year that I am beginning to feel like we are heading toward a "normal" life.

    But you know something? I would not trade my son for all the tea in China! He's my boy! :yes2557:

    (And lordy, do I have the stories to tell... :biggrin_2559:)
     
  7. Aussie

    Aussie <strong>Thunder From DownUnder</strong>

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    This child will have one of two paths - a brilliant career or burnt out by 25 with pressure to exceed everyone!
    As for matching Stephen Hawkins, if anyone has ever read his Quantum Theory, she is no match and it was idiotic to even suggest she is on par or anywhere near his ability untill such times as she can understand and either improve on, or disprove his theories!
    Sorry - but a 2 year old does'nt measure up!!!
     
  8. firstcav

    firstcav Medium Load Member

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    There's a lot of stress with being this smart. It's not what it's cracked up to be. Usually these kids have a hard time relating to people socially.
     
  9. jamwadmag

    jamwadmag Road Train Member

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    Limitations

    Geniuses are often accused of lacking common sense, or emotional sensitivity. Stories of a genius in a given field being unable to grasp "everyday" concepts are abundant and of ancient vintage: in his dialog Theætetus, Plato offers a picturesque anecdote of the absentmindedness of Thales. Some individuals in this arena of "absent-minded professors" and persons lacking normal social skills fall in the Autistic spectrum (such as Asperger Syndrome). A genius's intense focus on a given subject might appear obsessive-compulsive in nature, but it might also simply be a choice made by the individual. If one is performing groundbreaking work in one's field, maintaining other elements of life might logically be relegated to insignificance.
    While the absent-minded professor notion is not without merit, a genius is just as likely to encounter emotional problems as anyone else. Note the peculiarities of figures like Glenn Gould. Such examples, however, are likely products of mental or emotional instability rather than genius per se, and it has been shown that approximately two-thirds of gifted children fall prey to bullying.[1] Some geniuses' works were also unappreciated in their lifetime (e.g. Évariste Galois' mathematical contributions were finally fully published and declared sound in 1843, 11 years after his death).
    Socio-emotional problems are more prevalent in geniuses with an IQ above 145 (on the Wechsler Scale). Asynchronous development is the primary cause of this. As most children do not share gifted children's interests, vocabulary, or desire to organize activities, the genius child may withdraw from society.
    Some research shows that reasons other than maladjustment make companionship difficult to find for geniuses.[citation needed] As intelligence of a person increases, the number of those whom he or she considers peers tends to decrease. For example, at an IQ of 135 (on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale) only every hundredth person would be of equal or greater IQ. This number shrinks significantly as IQ goes up.:biggrin_25517:
     
  10. firstcav

    firstcav Medium Load Member

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    Yes I agree with this theory. I use this excuse on my wife all the time. When I forget her birthday, anniversary, or when I catch the bathtub on fire, I use my superior intelligence as the excuse for my lack of common sense and absentmindedness. I then pull out my rejection letter from Mensa and ask ,"do you have one these, I didn't think so".
     
  11. jamwadmag

    jamwadmag Road Train Member

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    in&#183;fer&#183;ence [​IMG] [​IMG] (&#301;n'f&#601;r-&#601;ns) n.
    1. The act or process of deriving logical conclusions from premises known or assumed to be true.
    If the 'Lack of Common Sense' means you are a genius, than ALL Liberals are geniuses! WRONG! Thk God I just made it under the 145!! ha ha

    :biggrin_25511:
     
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