2011 Cummins NOW reman ( a love story)

Discussion in 'Heavy Duty Diesel Truck Mechanics Forum' started by robotlab, Feb 14, 2021.

  1. robotlab

    robotlab Bobtail Member

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    I've been skateboarding to both coasts out of the midwest for four years. Having driven for companies, wanting to work for myself, I up and bought my own truck. 2011 pro star, cummins x15, eaton 10 spd. 400k miles. Truck made it @ 1400 miles from home when it managed to die in rather spectacular fashion. Shop is knee-deep in reman on my (8 day "new" ) truck.
    While you chuckle, or choke on your preferred morning beverage, let me 'splain my apparently poor choice in a truck.
    I chose the cheapest truck I could find. Having never used such logic to make a major financial purchase, I had met a few people that were very successful using said logic to purchase trucks. At least, that's what they told me while cooking my food for me at various truck stops I've frequented these last four years.
    The truck was parked way in the back of the dealership (behind the shop,) was really clean, and didn't have one of those "money pit" apu's installed, so I figured it'd be so much cheaper to maintain. Because the truck was pre-def, I wouldn't be burdened with all that after-treatment down-time and expense you guys are always writing about on here.
    Because I'm such a nice guy, good looking and all, the salesman was most helpful, and I really enjoyed the purchase experience.
    "Money in the bank" I told my wife long ago last week. Since I got off my flight home yesterday, I've heard those words repeated back to me more than a few times by said wife (for the time being she now adds,) with far different meaning.
    Since the first load I contracted to haul was going up to Northwest MT, I brought an extra blanket for what I figured would be a few chilly nights in the bunk.
    I learned a few things up there in the great state of Montana, yes, learn I did.
    I learned what an historic "Arctic cold front" feels like. It's rather indescribable to those who haven't experienced one in the cab of a ten year old, broken down semi with no apu, on a Friday night at 4600+ feet of elevation. My testicles are still buried deep in my belly, despite my being thawed out for several days, which is a good thing I'm thinking, as the aforementioned wife is sure to remove them if and when they do reappear.
    I'm gonna go get my truck when those excellent mechanics are finished repairing it next year.
    I need some advice, so I figured I'd ask more knowledgable people, like you guys. Trucker repair types, and you have great answers, really. I cant be the first guy to get this lucky?
    First, I'm gonna need a good divorce lawyer. Probably a cheap one, like cheapest one I can find.
    Most likely gonna need a new wife, a "cheap date" kinda lady, one that likes eunuchs, probably.
    Do you know any gently-used, handsome, frugal, single women in MT?
    Asking for a friend...
     
    Hulld, Dino soar, tommymonza and 5 others Thank this.
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  3. Bean Jr.

    Bean Jr. Road Train Member

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    Not to be that guy, but X15 is the current model. You have an ISX. 2011 did have the diesel particulate filter, which may be worse than DEF, but at least you don't have to pay for DEF.

    As far as your request, I can't help you because I'm looking for the same thing! My problem is a power divider, and it's cheaper to replace the whole drop in. Oh, and btw, let's not listen to the owner when he tells you what rear-end is in the truck, let's call Kenworth, because a 28 year old truck would never have had the rear end ratios changed!
     
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  4. Fieldrat

    Fieldrat Bobtail Member

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    I am sorry about your luck. But an old friend told me once that "women are like a greyhound bus. Stand around long enough and another one comes to your stop." He was a better mechanic than matchmaker, however...

    Here's some real advice though: if ever interested in purchasing a cummins powered truck, there is a nifty little feature on Cummins Insite. Make an image, then go to your images, right click the one in question. There will be an option labeled "analyze image". If you click this, there is an unbelievable wealth of information available about this history of that engine. If you don't have insite, find a mechanic who does. That alone would be worth paying a third party for before a major purchase.

    This is not a be all end all. This also does not replace a component inspection, but really be part of it. There's instances this will not apply, but generally, if applicable (ECM has not been replaced or changed in calibration) its a very powerful aid.

    Just a thought! Good luck in your travels
     
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  5. Socal Xpress

    Socal Xpress Road Train Member

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    So what actually broke?
     
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  6. robotlab

    robotlab Bobtail Member

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    Two valves in a cylinder failed. Debris (metal) left chamber via exhaust and entered turbo. More debris then continued through intake to other cylinders, rinse repeat.
     
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  7. jsnell

    jsnell Light Load Member

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    Something doesn't sound correct. Go to rawze. Com and check with them. Almost sounds like a fuel pump grenade. They will be helpful.
     
    Bean Jr. Thanks this.
  8. Fieldrat

    Fieldrat Bobtail Member

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    If it dropped a valve, thats absolutely correct. Depending on how long the engine was run determines how much metal went through it. Dropped valves are not uncommon on these engines.
    Fuel pump failures will also shed metal, but if you pull the valve cover its normally an open and shut case. Both repairs really should involve bareblocking the engine to clean all metal from the rifles, as well as inspecting all bushings for severity of the damage. That is why its usually cheaper to recon.

    Just a thought
    Just a thought.
     
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  9. robotlab

    robotlab Bobtail Member

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    Correct, valve cover removal didn't reveal cause, scoped cylinder that coded non-contribution, saw valve problem. Removed head, turbo and mystery solved.
    I'm still unsure how a 2011 ISX didn't/doesn't have DEF. I read and watched Cummins videos up to 2010 model year that were EGR/DPF only. Replacing the DPF yearly is not cost prohibitive at @$2k for a new one. I'm expecting w/ a reman to get troublefree use. Apparently there were many design improvements to the hot side of the ISX in 2010. Being that the truck sat so long (months,) before I bought it, I haven't lost hope.
     
    Bean Jr. Thanks this.
  10. Fieldrat

    Fieldrat Bobtail Member

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    2012 is the big year change from the cm871 to the cm2250. There's a lot of wacky stuff out there, but the date of manufacture should be on your engine, which may vary some from the date of manufacture of your truck.
     
    Bean Jr. Thanks this.
  11. robotlab

    robotlab Bobtail Member

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