Any tips for slowing on icy roads?

Discussion in 'Questions From New Drivers' started by Florescent-android92, Dec 6, 2021.

  1. Florescent-android92

    Florescent-android92 Bobtail Member

    7
    8
    Nov 21, 2021
    0
    I'm new to this career and would like all of the advices. I was on a very icy hill the other day, with a red light on the bottom. I gently pressed the brake and the rear of the tractor started sliding sideways. I let off the brake, it gained some traction, then downshifted another gear. The light turned green so I was saved...but I can't stop thinking about how to prevent this from happening other than doing like 10 mph the whole way down. My garbage city doesn't salt or sand either.

    I was doing about 20 mph when the truck kicked out. I'm just not sure wth to do here.
     
  2. Truckers Report Jobs

    Trucking Jobs in 30 seconds

    Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport.

  3. Rideandrepair

    Rideandrepair Road Train Member

    12,861
    40,682
    Aug 8, 2015
    0
  4. Dockbumper

    Dockbumper Road Train Member

    3,719
    9,517
    Apr 29, 2020
    0
    Go slower. Or......even slower.
     
    Wargames, Coffey, Tb0n3 and 11 others Thank this.
  5. Short Fuse EOD

    Short Fuse EOD Heavy Load Member

    926
    1,909
    Jul 29, 2015
    Merica
    0
    I go down on such a steep hill myself. Short and steep with tracks and light right as road evens. When it’s lousy out I am basically am stoped at the top before my desend. Lower gear and easy on brakes as needed. 10 mph yep. Slower if needed. It helps to have a balanced load. Not to light on trailer vs tractor or vs. If in doubt, I put on my chicken lights. So if I go sideways at least I’ll be looking great making a fool of myself.
     
  6. TankerP

    TankerP Road Train Member

    1,173
    2,645
    Oct 1, 2010
    Holding the steering wheel
    0
    If I’m sliding around at 20 mph then that’s a sign to get off the road.
     
  7. Brandt

    Brandt Road Train Member

    3,607
    4,456
    Sep 17, 2012
    0
    If you have tire chains or those new tire socks. That's what they run out west on the big mountain pass. No really practical most places unless out west because they have chain up area for trucks. I guess go slow like other said, and they told us in training you can't drive on ice.
     
    Florescent-android92 and tscottme Thank this.
  8. Brettj3876

    Brettj3876 Road Train Member

    8,846
    39,015
    Nov 18, 2014
    Canceling cancel culture/CCC
    0
    Very easy inputs on the throttle/brakes/steering, no Jake's if empty or light and if you must use the Jake(advise you not to)use the 1st stage. When coming up to a corner be at the speed you need to corner safely BEFORE you enter the corner. Braking in the corner could cause you to get loose and jackknife. What you should do is gently accelerate through the corner, key word being gently. That's so you're pulling the trailer and not it pushing on you.

    Imo 25-30k loaded evenly is about the perfect weight in the snow. Enough for good traction and if your in hill country it's not pushing you down the hill like 45k would
     
  9. Moosetek13

    Moosetek13 Road Train Member

    12,031
    12,541
    Nov 1, 2010
    Burnsville, MN
    0
    Truck tires do NOT have traction in those conditions.
    They simply are not made for it. Wrong tread, wrong compound.
    Maybe some are, but the company I drive for is not about to switch over to winter traction tires for the fleet.

    I shut down in those conditions.
     
  10. N00bLaLoosh

    N00bLaLoosh Medium Load Member

    663
    4,874
    May 13, 2021
    0
    How tight were you clenching before that light turned green?
     
  11. Pamela1990

    Pamela1990 Road Train Member

    1,820
    10,605
    Nov 7, 2021
    B.C. Canada
    0

    You have a terrible trainer.
    I drive on ice 150 days a year.

    Always stay calm, panic makes people do dumb stuff.
    Get to the side of the road as much as possible, the center is polished up, and the slipperiness decreases some at the edge, especially if there is snow at the edge.
    Chains are your friend.
    If you lock up on chains the cross bars tend to get pushed back, and you are just sliding on the tires again, so don't lock up the brakes, and if you do release them long enough to get rolling again.
     
  • Truckers Report Jobs

    Trucking Jobs in 30 seconds

    Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport.

  • Draft saved Draft deleted