Are power service and howes compatible with one another?

Discussion in 'Experienced Truckers' Advice' started by loose_leafs, Feb 6, 2021.

  1. loose_leafs

    loose_leafs Road Train Member

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    I never ran into this situation before, I always use exclusively one or the other.

    I wanted to have some extra anti gel on hand, and howes was all they had where I was today.

    If my previous fill-up was with power service, and say I run down to about 1/2 tank, refill and treat with howes. Are the two compatible with one another. Anyone use both together or have any issues?

    I just don't want to end up with two different products that end up reacting adversely with one another.
     
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  3. Old Man

    Old Man Road Train Member

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    Truck will explode

    no problem, most use the same chemicals
    To get rid of water and prevent jelling
     
  4. spindrift

    spindrift Road Train Member

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    Same ingredients...different formulations.
    No problem.
     
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  5. Happily Retired

    Happily Retired Road Train Member

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    I never had any luck with PowerService. Howes or one called FPPF, I think, small bottle. Either way, these days, it's money out the stack. I know it's cold, but you really shouldn't have any problem with today's fuel. I wonder what the "Ice Road Trucking" clowns used,,,( did you know, a lot of that footage was shot in Washington, and it wasn't 34 below either, like it said on the dash)
     
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  6. Rubber duck kw

    Rubber duck kw Road Train Member

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    Cheaper to buy antigel than straight number 1, not as hard on the injectors and fuel pump either in my opinion.
     
  7. Happily Retired

    Happily Retired Road Train Member

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    I thought all diesel today is blended at the factory. To be honest, I can't remember the last time I saw a #1 only pump. Years ago, we used to blend it ourselves. I didn't think fuel today gelled like it did years ago.
     
  8. loose_leafs

    loose_leafs Road Train Member

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    There are quite a few #1 diesel pumps in Minnesota, Wisconsin, the Dakota's, Montana, Wyoming, etc. Even some of the bigger chain stores have them. Obviously they aren't going to be put in places like Ohio and Kansas where they would almost never get used.

    Yes, most fuel along and north of the I-80 corridor claims to be pretreated. At most it is usually a 20% blend of #1 diesel (or comparable additives) good enough to get the diesel out of the pump at 0 degrees. Once that stuff gets in your tanks it's your problem.

    Diesel today is much more prone to gelling. The low sulfur content doesn't disperse the wax crystals, which can begin forming at temperature as warm as 20F if the fuel doesn't see any motion (if a truck sits in 20F weather elements for days without running). Biodiesel can make matters worse. In below zero temps if you shut your truck off for extended periods of time with "normal" fuel, you are asking for trouble, especially if you run the tanks low. A lot of people fuel up with southern biodiesel and run their trucks up north into the cold, and without treating it that's where problems start.

    I always treat my fuel and keep my tanks over half full if I know it's going to be below zero. You never know if you could break down or get stranded and for how long. At least with treated fuel, you have a better chance of getting the thing started after it sits in the cold for 14 hours. The newer trucks also do not circulate fuel and return it to the tanks as quickly as the older trucks did.

    If you live in the northern tier, look around this weekend and this coming week. You will see plenty of rookies, bottom feeders and absent minded drivers along the side of the road puffing smoke because they didn't take cold weather seriously.
     
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  9. Old Man

    Old Man Road Train Member

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    The problem comes when you don’t treat early. You need to get water out of your fuel system. Ice crystals will plug a filter the same as wax crystals .

    anyone running in cold that doesn’t carry a filter, wrench and something to fill the filter with is risking their life.
    If you don’t know how to change your filters have someone show you
    You can fill the filter with additive instead of diesel. The best filter wrench is a extra large set of channel lock pliers.
    If you have a fuel pressure gauge watch it, you can catch the problem before it strands you on the road.
     
  10. bowhunter67

    bowhunter67 Light Load Member

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    I have 300 gallon tanks and before this weekend I had half tanks of blended and filled it up with straight #1 been sitting all weekend at -25 this morning and still liquid now.
     
  11. loose_leafs

    loose_leafs Road Train Member

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    I have seen #1 and #2 literally separate within a fuel tank on a farm tractor. And the #2 was slush... But it had been sitting for weeks.
     
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