Are there torque rods on straight truck?

Discussion in 'Trucking Schools and CDL Training Forum' started by Newtotrucking2020, Dec 3, 2019 at 2:08 AM.

  1. Newtotrucking2020

    Newtotrucking2020 Bobtail Member

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    Illinois study guide mentions torque rod when checking suspension. Where is it on a straight truck? Front and back?
     
  2. Dino soar

    Dino soar Road Train Member

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    If the truck has a torque rod, it will be from on top of the rear housing running over to the frame.

    Older single axle trucks with spring suspension did not have torque rods. I don't know about later models that are spring suspension.
     
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  3. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

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    You managed to dust off a little something related to spring suspension.

    Assume anything bolted to, part of a truck be it a box, tractor or trailer has a role to play. If the frame has rods supporting it against twisting then you check those too.
     
  4. "semi" retired

    "semi" retired Road Train Member

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    Trucks with air ride, even single axle air ride, which most are today, has to have a torque rod on each side from the axle to the frame. It's what keeps the axle straight. Even spring ride had torque rods. Also on tandem axles, the torque rod goes the other way, to keep the axles from"walking" around a turn..
     
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  5. Goodysnap

    Goodysnap Road Train Member

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    Uhhhhhh No......

    Torque rods........oftenly mistaken for tracking rods which you have described above. Tracking rods go from axle to frame and keep the axle " tracking " or in line where it is supposed to.

    Torque rods on the other hand are support rods that keep the axle from rotating under torque. Axle to frame front to rear. 1 each side. If equipped. As you correctly stated, some suspensions are equipped and some are not.

    Forgive me for picking on your terminology. I'm forever getting my shop and parts guys to use the correct terminology to prevent mistakes from happening.
     
  6. "semi" retired

    "semi" retired Road Train Member

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    You're right, I was thinking track rods, thx.
     
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  7. Dino soar

    Dino soar Road Train Member

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    I believe you and I never would doubt what you say.

    The only thing that I can tell you is that the rod that runs from the top of my housing to the frame on my fld120 is called a torque rod in every listing that I have ever seen.

    I could be mistaken, but I thought the purpose of that rod is to stop the rear from flexing forward and backward, hence the name torque rod.

    I have honestly never heard of anything called a tracking bar. When I get time I'll have to look into that.

    Like I said, if you say it then I'm sure that it is factual. But every listing that I have seen at least for my truck that is called a torque Rod.
     
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  8. Goodysnap

    Goodysnap Road Train Member

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    It would never surprise me that Freightliner has always had it incorrect.....lol

    Sorry........Most of you know I'm hardcore Paccar. Had to throw in a jab.

    How's the truck coming?
     
  9. spyder7723

    spyder7723 Road Train Member

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    Thre funny thing is if I go to a parts store and tell the guy at the counter I need tracking rods for x truck they look at me like I got two heads. But if i say hey i need the dog bones for x truck they know exactly what I'm taking about.
     
  10. AModelCat

    AModelCat Road Train Member

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    OP:

    A straight truck, for all intents and purposes, is essentially the same thing as a truck used to pull a trailer. Only real difference between the two are one has a 5th wheel, the other has permanently mounted equipment on the frame. The trucks themselves are essentially the same thing (save for maybe some different air system plumbing to accomodate trailer brakes).
     
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