Baby boomers retiring and truck driver mills

Discussion in 'Experienced Truckers' Advice' started by VARITHMS, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. VARITHMS

    VARITHMS Medium Load Member

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    I have wondered what is the average age of a truck driver. I ask this because I started with a small company that trained me in house starting with bobtail flat beds and work my way up to a tractor trailer. This does not seem to happen any more. The access to trucks is through "driver mills" like JB Hunt, SNL, Werner etc. They seem to run off 10 times as many as they hire. I wonder if the people they run off return to driving through another company or get out driving all together. It would seem that in another 10-15 years the o/o will be gone or getting what they want to haul freight. I put this in the experienced area because I have only been driving for 14 years; not long enough to see industry trends.
     
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  3. RickG

    RickG Road Train Member

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    Most carriers that baby boomers retire from require at least a couple of years experience . The better carriers have drivers with 5 or more years experience applying.
    There are still tens of thousands of experienced drivers out of work . The "Stay with a bottom feeder for a year then you can move up " line is a big myth . There are many more times BFI drivers with a year experience than there is opening jobs for them.
     
  4. Emulsified

    Emulsified Road Train Member

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    I disagree.
    There are many former drivers out there that refuse to put up with what the industry hands them, or drive for the wages it pays now.
    I doubt there are that many experienced drivers out of work, unless they choose to be.
    It's simple economics.
    Why pay more when there's a line around the block of people that will (try) the job.
    Basic law of supply and demand.
     
  5. RickG

    RickG Road Train Member

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    There are some shippers that give low rates a priority . Carriers that service them take the ones willing to work for a low wage.
    Other shippers give quality of service a priority and pay a rate that allows carriers to hire and keep experienced drivers by payiing higher pay .
    We have drivers that have been working with the same shippers for 5 to 10 years.
     
  6. windsmith

    windsmith Road Train Member

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    Is it possible that those drivers are out of work as a result of CSA scores or disqualifying offenses?
     
  7. Krooser

    Krooser Road Train Member

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    just for info...the average lifespan of a career OTR driver is 62... I guess I beat the average. The lifespan of the average American male is 73... we don't do to good in that area.

    Many big outfits have a 90% yearly turnover... some 100%... the driver pool is getting older no doubt. Some of it has to do with older drivers starting a second career (can you call it that?)... some are just old like me.
     
  8. Moosetek13

    Moosetek13 Road Train Member

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    I am with a 'mill'.

    I have no service failures, I have damaged no property or freight, I am professional and get the load there safely and on time. I am always polite and respectful to clients, even when the opposite may not always be true.

    So tell me, how do the companies that charge more claim to give better service - or to be worth more?
    Just how is the 'quality of service' higher than what I, or the company I work for, provide?


    In the end, it's a pretty simple job.
    Get to the shipper on time and get loaded or pick up the load.
    Transport that load safely and in a reasonable time frame to the destination.
    Rinse and repeat.


    If one company can do it just as well for less cost, well, that's simply called competition. Others had simply better step up to the plate and give it their best swing, or forfeit the game.

    And if the 'mills' were not providing the 'high end quality service', they would not still be in business.
    Would they?


    Oh, by the way.
    I am one of those baby boomers.
    (And I doubt that I will be dead by 62. Although, $#!t happens)
     
  9. AZS

    AZS Honk if anything falls off

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    actually, thats exactly what I did just a few months ago.
     
    Moosetek13 Thanks this.
  10. RickG

    RickG Road Train Member

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    Yes , a small percentage manage that but not most .
     
  11. RickG

    RickG Road Train Member

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    You don't have a clue , do you ? My terminal has had the same ustomers and charged higher rates for over 15 years. We load and unload by appointment , have several drop and hooks , and most loads from shippers are preloaded .
    I have a drop and hook that is just over 600 miles in each direction . It pays me $425 going out , $375 coming back .Why doesn't one of your mills jump in and steal it with a cheaper rate ?
    We just got 15 new Peterbilts in . One of our customers did try a mill carrie on a new contract . Lesson learned. We are getting that contract and they won't make that mistake again .
    .
     
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