braking on big mountains...

Discussion in 'Experienced Truckers' Advice' started by elharrison, Feb 8, 2008.

  1. Powder Joints

    Powder Joints Subjective Prognosticator

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    Well you have to look in your JB Hunt/Swift Drivers Manual chapter 69 on how to have a Air seat rectal remove kit added to your truck. This is a real important chapter. Slow and Easy is how you come off Vail. If your in snow and ice and use your brakes you may not have steering when your braking so you really don't want to build excessive speed. Besides if you come off it too slow you can go back and try it a little faster till you work up and find out what terminal speed is for your truck.
     
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  3. otherhalftw

    otherhalftw Insignificant Otter

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    I always thought that JB weld was to keep the JB drivers in their seats, and off the unemployment lines!
     
  4. ottertail49

    ottertail49 Bobtail Member

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    amen! let it be written, let it be done.
     
  5. primexample

    primexample Light Load Member

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    WHAT 2 LOWER.
    when your coming west across the san andraus fault aint no climbing, so dont give me that 2 lower bs.
     
  6. otherhalftw

    otherhalftw Insignificant Otter

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    If you only run the I-10 from Phoenix into LA basin, true you really have no climbs, but you do have one good down grade. I am talkig about the down grade from Chiriaco Summit into Indio, long enough to drop one or two to smoothly decend without braking excessively...but if you are one of the hot dogs, you just let it run.

    We are talking about real climbs, Donner, Snoqualmie, Cabbage, Vail, and several out east, that actually can be worse on equipment than our long pulls out west. Don't localize the discussion to one interstate that you drive exclusively please. Some of us don't play in the sandbox of the Mojave, we have varied routes and have a more diverse driving experience.

    Bring your driving style up north on I-5 and have some fun with us on the Grapevine, Ashland grade, Three Sisters, and when you are ready give White Bird a try. Bring an extra fire extinguisher for White Bird..you might need it!:biggrin_25525:
     
  7. JChors

    JChors Medium Load Member

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    The San Andreas Fault crosses I-5 at Gorman, on the Grapevine (Tejon Pass). It also crosses I-15 at Hwy 138 (Cajon Pass).:biggrin_2554:
     
  8. primexample

    primexample Light Load Member

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  9. jlkklj777

    jlkklj777 20 Year Truckload Veteran

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    Everyone has to start some where primexample. I will not criticize you for working at Stevens.They are giving you a shot at getting into this industry and keeping you employed so you do owe them your loyalty.

    The braking method you are currently using obviously works. It has worked and was taught for years (and apparently still is at some truck driving schools). There are many old timers with 30, 40, and even more, years of driving under their belt that still use the steady brake method.

    The current technology and testing indicates there is a more progressive, better way to brake on serious mountain grades. I believe the others and I have established that. No one is forcing you to change your mind. Use which ever method best suits you. Of course should you decide to learn snub braking it will simply make you a more versatile and capable driver. As I see it, improving your skills (as well as everyone else's) was the entire purpose of this thread.

    Drive safely.
     
    otherhalftw Thanks this.
  10. primexample

    primexample Light Load Member

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    First of all let me tell you. All the instructors at my school has over 30 years of driving otr so i could care less about your 17 years and 2 million miles your still a beginner compared to them.you probably haven't pulled a 80,000 lb load anyway in 17 years.:boxing:
     
  11. jlkklj777

    jlkklj777 20 Year Truckload Veteran

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    Is this guy for real?

    Kinda sounds like; "my daddy can beat up your daddy!" and My Big brother can beat up your big brother!" MY school is better than yours nyah, nyah. Sheesh how pathetic.

    I have tried to be civil and diplomatic to you primexample and yet again you reject the wisdom I have offered you. I pointed to "experts" in crash investigation and explanations of WHY snub braking is the preferred method of driving today. You are simply too obtuse to get it apparently.

    Frankly your posts are worthless in my mind and have offered nothing of substantive value in any of the comments I have read from you. I leave it to the others to judge whether you have offered ANY information of value.

    Just to set the record straight;

    My training; North East Career Schools Manchester New Hampshire Attended in November of 1991 thru January of 1992. An 8 week intensive course splitting half the time (first 4 weeks) in the classroom and the other half on the range. 2nd 4 weeks spent half the time on the range and the other half driving all over New England at night as well as during the day in every type of weather.
    Training consisted of winter driving techniques, vehicle inspections, trucking history, Hos regs, map reading, trip planning, road survival techniques, customer service expectations, adjusting brakes, Driving techniques that included upgrades, down grades, switch backs, square out turns, button hook turns, u turns, backing set ups for straight line, parallel parking (sight side and blind side), as well as alley docks (sight side and blind side). For fun we would back around 55 gallon drums (sight side and blind side) as well as figure eights around 2 barrels in a day cab tractor.

    The above skills used on a regular basis while traveling ALL over the lower 48 states and 2 provinces in Canada. Spending over 300 days per year on the road each year.

    Silly Boy, I have run loads that have been well OVER 80,000 lbs. The loads I pull today vary between a low of 15,000 lbs in the box to 46,000 lbs. Having to run partial tanks of fuel to stay under gross. Even ran some loads outlaw dodging scales due to being too heavy in the past.

    You are simply out of your depth and do not comprehend it. When you have mastered the above and have at least 2 million miles under your belt then come talk to me.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2009
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