CMV Fatalities at Highest Rate Since 1988

Discussion in 'ELD Forum | Questions, Answers and Reviews' started by Timin770, Oct 24, 2019.

  1. Crude Truckin'

    Crude Truckin' Road Train Member

    1,021
    2,432
    Oct 22, 2016
    Zeta Reticuli
    0
  2. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

    30,516
    34,593
    Mar 5, 2016
    White County, Arkansas
    0
    I agree on idiots. The quality of training isnt there. And speeding is not the problem hard to have a fatal at 60+ governed.

    The problem is that a situation presents itself and there is no place to put the truck and done. You don't always get to make it. I could argue that the trucks themselves are getting crappier due to emissions and burn easily. They did not define the fatalities by type of death. (Crush, fire etc)

    I could have easily been a statistic. But usually pulled a rabbit out of hat in the time that's left by presence of mind and unwillingness to just let the smash happen.
     
  3. Timin770

    Timin770 Heavy Load Member

    878
    763
    May 27, 2011
    Canton, GA
    0
    What kind of training did drivers get in the past, before driving schools?
     
    Dave_in_AZ and Rideandrepair Thank this.
  4. Ridgeline

    Ridgeline Road Train Member

    15,398
    58,685
    Dec 18, 2011
    Michigan
    0
    "The FMCSA promised that the ELD Mandate would “help create a safer work environment for drivers.”"

    I never read that coming from the FMCSA, I always read that in articles as an assumption for the reasoning.

    ELD is not the problem, the HOS is. Returning it back to the 1962 HOS version with an ELD and the flexibility of the 1962 HOS would work for all involved.

    I also think the number of accidents increases is because of the lack of proper safety training and the lack of a better licensing system. Maybe returning to the simplified version of licensing is one possible avenue to remove the power of the mills or maybe going the other way and having a graduated licensing system where you have to actually know how it all works, the regs and so on to get into a truck.
     
  5. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

    30,516
    34,593
    Mar 5, 2016
    White County, Arkansas
    0
    One example to flexability is the old system where you can get 10 hours sleeper time any way you split. For example 5 hours driving, 4 hours sleep repeat until infinity or when your 70 is up. If you examine that against say a 10 hour driving and 8 hours straight sleeping.... thats a 15 hour day in 24 hours driving. In the first instance you actually HAve a little more time to roll it midnight to midnight.

    Personal Conveyance and other frivolities due to the human needs of drivers versus the tactical situation of rest, food etc after being told OUT by a receiver etc is further regulated today. Its unnecessary. It was not a issue in the past and should not be today.

    Finally not least, the precision is excessive. A minute would decide a violation or not. Or perhaps a 100 foot move to a legal parking spot after being told to move etc would be a violation and so on. Most people cannot get across town to a doctor in 10 minutes past appt time. And here we are rolling upwards of 3000 miles plus to be somewhere 5 minutes to the good against a appt time.

    It should raise a pretty easy situation to blame the ELD for being late again.
     
    Lpirtle, Rideandrepair and bzinger Thank this.
  6. Timin770

    Timin770 Heavy Load Member

    878
    763
    May 27, 2011
    Canton, GA
    0

    "...The electronic logging device (ELD) rule – congressionally mandated as a part of MAP-21 – is intended to help create a safer work environment for drivers..."

    This is from the FMCSA website.

    Electronic Logging Devices

    don't forget what the letters FMCSA stand for
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2019
    TallJoe and Rideandrepair Thank this.
  7. Long FLD

    Long FLD Road Train Member

    3,436
    9,816
    Mar 4, 2015
    Murdo SD
    0
    I see no vehicle miles traveled anywhere on those charts, only fatality numbers. More trucks on the road would mean the chance for more accidents and fatalities. Without knowing miles traveled they can’t say the rate increased, they only have proof the number of fatalities increased.
     
    Kurt Michaels, peterd, shogun and 2 others Thank this.
  8. Ridgeline

    Ridgeline Road Train Member

    15,398
    58,685
    Dec 18, 2011
    Michigan
    0
    Tim I get that but I've never seen the fmcsa claim it is about just as a work environment.
     
    Rideandrepair Thanks this.
  9. Timin770

    Timin770 Heavy Load Member

    878
    763
    May 27, 2011
    Canton, GA
    0
    They don't need miles traveled if they are doing a simple year-to-year comparison. The 'rate' is per year
     
  • Draft saved Draft deleted