cooking in the truck

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking in the Truck | Trucker Recipe Forum' started by beezle, Jun 19, 2007.

  1. Aleeex

    Aleeex Light Load Member

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    I generally get my wife to make some mashed potatoes.. and some soup. Then bring some frozen Asparagus and frozen mushrooms. I also get the frozen but seasoned tilapia that's ready to bake (by the frozen dinners, not fish department)
    Some polish sausages.. and some sort of cooked chicken.

    I bought one of those 12v stoves at the truck stop.. and instead of using the little plates they sell for $1/each I buy a roll of foil and just line the stove with that.

    For the frozen stuff you need about 1.5 hrs to heat up. So I usually put everything in the stove when I stop... then continue driving without plugging it in.. when I know I'll stop in about an hr I'll plug it in..

    For soup I use the plates that the truck stop sells.. and I usually heat the soup while I go to take a shower. By the time I'm back to the truck.. soup is almost boiling.


    I'm not sure if soup is everybody's thing.. but I like to mix up my meals so they aren't all solids..
     
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  3. MsJamie

    MsJamie Road Train Member

    Wow... long shower! :)

    Seriously, I've found mini loaf pans that fit the RoadPro "lunchbox" at one of the dollar stores; 3 pans for $1. I believe it was at a Family Dollar. The pans are pretty sturdy; I get several uses out of each.

    For liquids, I prefer the Burton Digital Stove that TA/Petro sells. It uses a nonstick pot that's about a 6" cube. They're not as cheap as the RoadPro, but with the temperature control, they're more flexible. Which one I use depends on what I'm cooking. The stuff that works in either usually goes in the Burton.
     
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  4. Buzzard2157

    Buzzard2157 Light Load Member

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    Dec 27, 2012
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    While Aleeex and MsJamie have excellent suggestions, BigFella ain't about to go to that much "trouble" ... it's gotta be something he can take from fridge to microwave with no fuss, no muss.

    And cleaning dishes??? LOLOLOL let's not go *THERE* ;)
     
  5. rockstar_nj

    rockstar_nj Medium Load Member

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    Cape May Court House, NJ
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    220 pages is way too much to read through... Does anyone here have any experience with induction cooktops? Are they worth buying?
     
  6. Lepton1

    Lepton1 Road Train Member

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    Yukon, OK
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    Agreed about the length of the thread.

    Pay attention to the watts and amps required with an induction cooktop. They have a LOT of draw. Unless you install at least a 2500w inverter you are going to have a difficult time using it. If you are planning on running it on 12v with an inverter below 300w (as most company trucks require), then forgetaboutit.
     
  7. rockstar_nj

    rockstar_nj Medium Load Member

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    So I'm probably better off with a small charcoal grill?
     
  8. Lepton1

    Lepton1 Road Train Member

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    I think a charcoal grill will only be something you might use when you have plenty of time on a nice day, cooking outside on the catwalk or at a picnic table. Time to get it going, time to cook, and time to clean up and let it cool down before stowing it away again. IMHO it would be way too cumbersome a process and take up too much room in the side box for me to consider a charcoal grill.

    For cooking in the truck I prefer a Burton stove, with variable heat settings from 100ºF to 350ºF. If you can put up with delicious smells while you are driving you can use it as a slow cooker and have your meal ready to eat at the end of a hard day's driving. Clean up is a snap, it can wipe down if you are in a remote location.

    My own diet over the course of the last two years has been going more and more to raw fruits and vegetables, so I rarely cook in the truck anymore. When I want to cook something now I plan on using a microwave at a truck stop or terminal.

    Coffee is important to me and I make my own with a coffee press. I use a simple 12v water heater to get the water ready.
     
  9. Digi-Trucker

    Digi-Trucker Bobtail Member

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    Feb 16, 2015
    Edmonton, AB
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    We have a George Foreman grill we use. The Comfort Pro APU has no problem running it. It is rated at 1400w. Doesn't mention the current draw, but P=##V so about 12 Amps. If it really runs at 110v internally.
    It works awesome on thick cut porkchops, steaks, etc. minimal smoke. Stores away easily.
    Also we have a small 69 dollar cdn tire BBQ for flatbed grilling, and a few of the small propane tanks for that. Good for when you got to Louisiana, and get fresh jumbo prawns :)
    But as someone mentioned, having mixed veggie trays in a cooler or the mini fridge is about the best "road food" you will have. IMHO.
     
  10. JimmyBones

    JimmyBones Heavy Load Member

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    Baxley, GA
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    I have never gotten an induction stovetop to work on my truck, and foreman grills can get messy. I prefer the ninja three in one and a rice cooker/steamer.
     
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  11. Freightlinerbob

    Freightlinerbob Road Train Member

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    image.jpg Steak by Trangia alcohol stove.
     
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