Food service for skinny guys

Discussion in 'LTL and Local Delivery Trucking Forum' started by systems, Jul 7, 2019.

  1. systems

    systems Bobtail Member

    1
    0
    Jul 7, 2019
    0
    I was on a diet and pretty happy with my weight. However, I just started a new job doing food service again. And now, I’m wondering if I should gain weight so it’ll be easier to haul food into stores. Does anyone know of any skinny guys who do food service that are strong? I’m worried that if I continue dieting to look thin, I won’t have the strength to haul 300 lbs of product on a dolly into a store. To give you guys a picture, I’m currently 140 lbs. When I was doing food service 3 years ago, I was at 160 lbs. So, I’m thinking of going back up to 160 to make hauling food easier, but not sure about the risk of being overweight with a big belly.

    What do you guys think? Thank you.
     
  2. MartinFromBC

    MartinFromBC Road Train Member

    1,804
    7,999
    Oct 19, 2018
    0
    Fat isn't muscle.
    Stay slim and healthy, do some cardio and weights.
    I have always been skinny, still am. Makes it hard to buy jeans is the biggest problem.
     
  3. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

    26,975
    28,815
    Mar 5, 2016
    White County, Arkansas
    0
    I was doing food service with Darden at your weight. Taken care of 4 particular Red Lobster Resturants with Lobsters upwards of 120 pounds a box and seafood, beef and so on frozen same situation 90 pounds and up. All day.

    About 22 I went into a Pizza Dough place at a little lighter than that. Most everyone with us about 50 were bordering on 6.6 and 400 pounds muscle and no necks. Here I am lost in the crowd. This was orientation. Any thought of this job being easy in terms of trucking versus driving evaporated.

    Bossman in that room he looked at me and said I need seasoning and 20 years, come back then. Just too runt for the work expected of us. What he did not know was I would unload 48000 twice daily on the trailer and back off. He says I'll be doing 6 in deep DC washington city. And I aint got what it takes to get a 18 wheeler out of some of those tight places.

    No hard feelings. Hindsight said he was right. He had a good eye for men that he needed. Not little boys not full grown even though they can drive or work but not both. There is a difference.

    I would work trailers until close to 40 when the spine failed one day. Followed by the muscles in several important regions of the body.

    Im still making repairs almost 20 years on. Almost done.

    Food Service WILL keep you strong and fit. Don't over do it. You can get really hurt fast. At the same time if you did have the steel to do this work and stay on it for some time, you will find yourself a gift of a future fitness most people would have lost later in life and then they wonder why they are so sick in the hospital.
     
    systems Thanks this.
  4. motocross25

    motocross25 Road Train Member

    1,351
    2,974
    Sep 23, 2010
    Overland Park, KS
    0
    Honestly if you can do the work, being too slim is not a downfall. Foodservice is tough on the joints, namely the knees. When I did foodservice I was 6’3” 170. 6 lbs lighter than I am now. You’ll be alright. As @MartinFromBC stated, the jean fitting is the problem :mad:
     
  5. MartinFromBC

    MartinFromBC Road Train Member

    1,804
    7,999
    Oct 19, 2018
    0

    Yes, us tall skinny guys have a hard time getting jeans that fit.
    I need a 31 waist, 36 leg, its like trying to find the holy grail.
    I just special order them 10 pairs at a time now, worn the same size jeans for 33 years.
     
  6. Diesel Dave

    Diesel Dave Last Few of the OUTLAWS

    4,966
    5,638
    Jan 20, 2010
    Hesperia, Ca.
    0
    You’ll gain weight doing food service. They offer you food after your done doing there delivery. It happens to my son all the time. He’s gain a few pounds through the years. You will be fine.
     
    double_r, systems and MartinFromBC Thank this.
  7. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

    26,975
    28,815
    Mar 5, 2016
    White County, Arkansas
    0
    I thought 34 or so was right good for a long time. However in the world of concealed carry I found it necessary to get into the 40 range to fit so I don't reveal the gun to those who do not need to see it.

    You cannot understand how hard it is to find a 40 in this land full of people who have bought stacks of 40 or bigger.

    I also have been long enough here in America alive to see the failures of our Textile Mills. The clothing stock in retail is made overseas by Nations who idealogically stand against America with hard eyes. But they sure love that US Dollar because one of those makes a whole months scratching in local currency unnecessary. And so they sit and weave and spin. But are CAREFUL to use materials that do not last.

    Get some socks? 6 months buy more and more and more wait hold up... lets get socks from someone who knows what they are about eh?

    That was my big thought. I rememered the Mills I have forgotten about. In my own land even.

    I hate to be difficult but I am beginning to be mighty careful about that American Dollar.

    But those socks? They should hold up and earn their keep out there.
     
    MartinFromBC and systems Thank this.
  8. "semi" retired

    "semi" retired Road Train Member

    6,435
    10,344
    Apr 16, 2014
    high plains colorado
    0
    You won't find too many overweight food service drivers. Think of it as going to the gym all day.
     
    x1Heavy, MartinFromBC and FlaSwampRat Thank this.
  9. haz-matguru

    haz-matguru Road Train Member

    2,168
    2,640
    Feb 18, 2012
    0
    I was a young 177 pound guy when I was a milk delivery guy. And my calfs were like rocks back then from going up and down the ramp. Those crates of milk were heavy. And I couldn't imagine doing that at let's say 250 or more pounds.

    Food service works best for younger skinnier guys. Not your semi fat through trucker type of fat guys. Or guys in late 30's on up. It would take too long for a 330 pound guy to unload 9 stops and hundreds of cases.
     
    MartinFromBC and "semi" retired Thank this.
  10. double_r

    double_r Heavy Load Member

    740
    444
    Sep 6, 2008
    Pittsburgh,PA
    0
    We have more guys in there 40's and early 50's then we do in their late 20's early 30's at my DC. And most of us in our 40's and 50's have been doing food service for 15+ years. If you take care of your body and lift and bend right, you can have a long career in food service. Oh, and none of us old farts are slow either. We can out run the younger guys, LOL
     
    speedyk, truck_guy and FlaSwampRat Thank this.
  • Draft saved Draft deleted