Getting a job on "Ice Road Truckers?"

Discussion in 'Trucking Jobs' started by Owner's Operator, Aug 13, 2008.

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  1. passingtrucker

    passingtrucker Light Load Member

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    The trucking industry fails to mention negative facts, like how many people are killed in truck accidents every year. This data would discourage newbies from becoming truckers if the federal data were to become common knowledge.
    http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/CrashProfile/n_overview.asp
    The 2007 fatality statistic is not available because a number of states refuse to release their data, following the recommendations of ATA (American Trucking Association) to withold this info. The FMCSA is under pressure from businesses not to disclose how many truckers are killed every year. Furthermore, the trucking industry fails to mention that mileage pay increases when drivers falsify logbooks, or how many truckers are hijacked every year when they haul merchandise or high-value products.

    Much as we in the USA don't release negative data, the producers of Ice Road Truckers fail to mention just how many people are killed every year when the ice breaks, and they sink to the bottom with the driver still on board. The LA Times had published an investigative report on this a few years back, and as I recall, the article said the majority of trucks falling through the ice were the result of driver negligence. Snow began to fall, the drivers couldn't clearly see the ice road, and they gradually veer off course into thinner ice. You'll notice the program always shows clear weather when the drivers are going through the ice. I'd speculate they've instituted a strick policy not to haul the load when inclement weather is reported, and the driver risk a white-out situation, where all you see is white and you can no longer distinguish where the paved road ends, and where the shoulder begins.

    If this job is as safe as they claim, why is there not a waiting list of drivers waiting to be interviewed for the job ?? Why do they not show the owners of these small fleets going through a stack of resumes from drivers who want in on this lucrative position. It's likely the reason is self-evident, no matter how much high-tech equipment they use to ascertain the integrity of the frozen lake, there are other factors that can weaken a section of ice road. Much as most drivers are aware of the risk involved when you haul merchandise or high-value loads (hijacking), you have to be realistic and accept the fact, you can still die of quick severe hypothermia when that ice breaks, and it's time to meet your creator.
    What's the gross weight of your vehicle when you run these frozen lakes ??
     
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  3. lostNfound

    lostNfound Road Train Member

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    :biggrin_25526:

    I won't speak for wildkat, but they are signed for 64,000 kg (141,000 lbs) IIRC.
     
  4. mannmk7

    mannmk7 Medium Load Member

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    In the new Ice Road Truckers the owner of the trucking company clearly states he doesn't like hiring drivers from the south, talking about Huge and the other guys from Yellowknife. So they don't even want to hire guys from Yellowknife, let alone the USA. (It seems from the rumbling that Canadians only like Americans when their in America).

    This speaks volumes for the idea of hiring, and especially from out of the country. Our companies and our government should take lessons from Canada. In our country it seems anybody from anywhere, including third world countries can get a job. :biggrin_25526:
     
  5. Wildkat

    Wildkat <strong>Arctic Mistress</strong>

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    The gross weight restriction is 64,000 kg ... 135,000 lbs roughly, but the local DOT tell me it's actually double that. It HAS to be rated as a ROAD that is what our regular PAVEMENT highways are rated at. Myself, the combinations I pull are rated at 56,000 kg.

    And, as for deaths on the highway...there hasn't been ONE since I've been running up there.

    AS I said there are RULES... 1 KILOMETRE (0.6 of a mile) OVER the speed limit WILL net you a fine of 950$...5 kms 10,000$
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2008
  6. Etosha

    Etosha World Citizen

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    Kat, don't they ban drivers for the season if they have an infraction like that? Or is it on the second offence for the season?
     
  7. Wildkat

    Wildkat <strong>Arctic Mistress</strong>

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    Yes, drivers CAN & ARE banned for speeding, as far as I know it's ONE strike & you're out, I have also heard of drivers being banned for "unprofessional conduct", that's what happened to those donkey's on the original "Ice Road Truckers" show. The owners of the road told them & History Channel NOT to come back. On the big road..to the mines..trucks are dispatched in groups of 3, 20 minutes apart, you STAY with your group, you don't leave each other behind, you maintain proper following distance...1000 metres or kilometre apart.
     
  8. inthewindaz

    inthewindaz Light Load Member

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    That "last crossing" gave me butterflies just looking at the photo... even seeing the sonar truck... I'd still be wondering... and knowing that water is C-O-L-D and DEEP. Wow. Very cool. So how does one get on doing that?
    Just curious, not saying I am... lol

     
  9. Wildkat

    Wildkat <strong>Arctic Mistress</strong>

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    Believe me it gave ME butterflies... I definitely DON'T like crossing the last few times in the spring.. Truthfully all last winter I wasn't comfortable on the ice... but one does what one has to do...

    To get "on" you must first be a Canadian Citizen, or Landed Immigrant...we aren't allowed to hire anyone who's not. Then you must have some "real" winter driving experience...we don't have Interstates here, the vast majority of our highways, especially in the far North, are narrow winding GRAVEL roads. You must be mechanically inclined...tow trucks don't exist. There's no truck stops, no cell phone service, not much of anything. We rely totally on one another. You have to...you could die otherwise.
     
  10. Roadmedic

    Roadmedic Road Train Member

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    I for one am not interested. I drive in enough snow. I don't really like the cold. -36 in Sask is enough. I like civilization, paved roads and even the thought of a truckstop.

    You have my greatest admiration. :yes2557:
     
  11. Wildkat

    Wildkat <strong>Arctic Mistress</strong>

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    It has nothing to do with whether we like you or not! Our employment standards just simply do not allow it...no matter WHERE you are from. And the second thing is your CDL is NOT recognized as valid up here...it's seen as a second driver's license which is illegal to hold in Canada.
     
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