HAZMAT and overheated tires. Remove it?

Discussion in 'Hazmat Trucking Forum' started by Flankenfurter, Feb 20, 2021.

  1. Flankenfurter

    Flankenfurter Light Load Member

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    I'm getting my CDL and HAZMAT endorsement. Got a question I'd like to get some insight on, if you don't mind helping.

    The CDL manual says in the HAZMAT section, "Remove any overheated tire. Place it a safe distance from your vehicle. Don't drive until you correct the cause of the overheating."

    First, how do I know if my tires are too hot?

    Second, do you actually remove your tires and roll them a "safe distance" away?

    Third, how do you change/remove a truck tire by yourself?

    I'm going to go out on a limb here. I would guess trip planning, slower speeds, breaks every couple hours, and monitoring tire pressure and temperature is the way to go.
     
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  3. austinmike

    austinmike Road Train Member

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    Your first job you won’t be removing anything especially tires.
     
  4. AModelCat

    AModelCat Road Train Member

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    Most drivers won't remove a tire over the course of their entire career.
     
  5. bad-luck

    bad-luck Road Train Member

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    I am sorry, I couldn't resist..... hqdefault.jpg
     
  6. Flankenfurter

    Flankenfurter Light Load Member

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    Phew. I was trying to figure out how to bring my pneumatics with me. ;)
     
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  7. Brandt

    Brandt Road Train Member

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    When you pull a hazmat load your supposed to check your tires everytime you stop. If you find one that's to hot don't keep driving. You call someone to come change tires or fix the problem that making the tire get hot.
     
  8. slow pok

    slow pok Light Load Member

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    Glad somebody said the real thing here instead of being a ### about it
     
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  9. mpd240

    mpd240 Road Train Member

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    Now that that is over. Let’s start the #### guys
     
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  10. Flint1

    Flint1 Medium Load Member

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    Everyone looked at me like I was crazy. I came prepared and wanted to get home. Trailer had to be unloaded for the jack I had. Screenshot_20210220-221145_Gallery.jpg
     
    Flankenfurter Thanks this.
  11. scott180

    scott180 Medium Load Member

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    I drove fuel trucks. I nor anyone I knew had any equipment to remove a tire. Oddly enough it's safer to have a full load then an empty one. A full load of gasoline will keep the aluminum tank over the fire cool enough to keep from burning. As long as the tank is not compromised it won't go up. Empty on the other hand will burn through the aluminum and set of the gas vapors and blow up big time.

    If you have a tire that might go up in flames your responsibility is call the police and get yourself and others away. They will get the fire department involved if needed.. Pretrip and checking every time you stop will take care of most problems but you never know what could happen.
     
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