HOS Compliance

Discussion in 'Trucking Industry Regulations' started by landy77, Jul 4, 2011.

  1. landy77

    landy77 Light Load Member

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    I have two questions that pertain to HOS.

    First question is, if detention places you over your 14 hours is there a way to drive and find a place to park and not be in violation. A trip to Vermont comes to mind.

    Second questions is, being the HOS rules are relatively new, unless you have been on the road the past two years you don't see how it works. Has anyone noticed a disconnect between dispatchers that understand how to run things before but is frustrated with the new HOS now?
     
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  3. ronin

    ronin Road Train Member

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    These are the same HOS rules that have been in place since 2005.

    There has ALWAYS been a disconnect between dispatchers and drivers on HOS...

    And, on the 14 hr question, unless you have a hard entry like fuel or a DOT inspection, most would say log how you need to so you could move without being in violation, since there's no other way around it.
     
  4. THBatMan8

    THBatMan8 Road Train Member

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    If you're held up at a shipper 'till your 14 hour clock runs dry then park at the shipper for a 8-2 split. If the shipper doesn't allow parking, use the extension [395.1 (B)] to locate a parking haven. If you're at a reciever, you can drive off duty when empty. Company policy may dictate otherwise though.

    The HOS regs have been around for a long time with little to no modifications. For the most part, it isn't the dispatchers job to decipher if you have the hours to run the load or not, but yours and yours alone. The dispatchers don't have the time to look at log books of every truck in their fleet. If you get a load that you can't run, either refuse it or work out a swap location with your DM.
     
  5. Cowpie1

    Cowpie1 Road Train Member

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    There has been a disconnect between drivers and dispatchers since the first HOS rules started in 1938. Nothing new.

    As was stated, if empty and the 14 has run out, just drive OFF DUTY to where you can find a place to park. Even if loaded, you will still need to leave and find a place. Private property rights have nothing to do with HOS regulations. If you have to leave, you have to leave. And it is better to leave in violation of HOS than it is to leave in handcuffs. The local Gestapo could care less about any HOS concerns.
     
  6. Scalemaster

    Scalemaster Heavy Load Member

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    Adverse driving condition exception does not extend the 14 hr rule. Sorry.
     
  7. CCCowgirl

    CCCowgirl Light Load Member

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    So legally you cannot move the truck AND legally you cannot stay where you are.

    Perhaps the only way out of this one is to tell the shipper/receiver your truck is broken down and cannot be moved until it gets repaired. (Maybe they will let you stay on their property if too many other drivers haven't pulled this one on them.) And then, magically, when your break is up and you can drive again, your truck is "cured".

    Anybody got a better idea? Some things just aren't right when it comes to the real world but "that's truckin'".
     
  8. THBatMan8

    THBatMan8 Road Train Member

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    I thought it did for some odd reason. You don't plan on being stuck at the shipper for 5+ hours, which would explain where I was comming from.

    Regardless, it's still better to take the violation.
     
  9. THBatMan8

    THBatMan8 Road Train Member

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    If you tell the shipper that, they will call a tow truck and have you towed to a repair shop. You wont be going anywhere until either you or your company pays the bill.
     
  10. CCCowgirl

    CCCowgirl Light Load Member

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    Depends on the shipper/receiver, how much room they have, and what kind of day who ever is in charge is having; if completely heartless then that magical healing I mentioned would need to occur before the tow company gets called. Then you are back to choosing which law you want to break.
     
  11. THBatMan8

    THBatMan8 Road Train Member

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    Shippers who dont allow parking dont care about your 14 hour clock. When they tell you to move, you better move or you'll leave the place in handcuffs with a trespassing charge.

    That being said; I have never ran my 14's out at a shipper. It's all in your trip planning. If you get a load that is back to back with another load and/or has alot of deadhead miles, refuse it if you can't legally run it. If you accept the load, you accept the violation that comes with it. You need to be able to arrive at a shipper with a fresh 14 hour clock. If you arrive with 3 hours left and 1 hour of drive time, no offence but you deserve the violation. ;)

    I run my 14's out at a reciever all of the time; but when you're empty you can drive off duty.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2011
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