Hotshotting with a 2006 Dodge Ram 3500

Discussion in 'Expediter and Hot Shot Trucking Forum' started by Hotshot Newbie, Sep 18, 2021.

  1. Hotshot Newbie

    Hotshot Newbie Bobtail Member

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    Hello All,

    A 2006 Ram 3500 has a Manufacturer GCWR of 23,000 LBS. Ram also says the max trailer weight is: 15,300. This 15,300 would also decrease as one puts on an auxiliary fuel tank and whatnot onboard.

    Here is where I'm getting some of the specs, go all the way to the bottom: http://www.rambodybuilder.com/2006/docs/dr/mlup.pdf

    If this 2006 is coupled with a 40' BigTex a.k.a (35+5), that trailer weighs 6,330 LBS. Here is the math for the payload: 15,300 - 6,330 = 8,970 So, a max payload of 8,970. That is not enough to work with in my opinion. I do have a CDL and could wait and save up money for a more modern capable truck.

    But to stay with what I can afford now: I've heard from some credible people that own these 3rd Generation Ram's and say the 2006 3500 Manual Transmission is capable of the extra weight with the proper upgrades of Power, exhaust brake, and suspension.

    I am trying to get to the question, should I get the 2006 and plan on running a few thousand pounds over manufacturer GCWR? Is that legal?

    I am thinking that is what was done up until 2014 where Ram finally upped the GCWR to 37,500, but I digress. I am striving for Legal and Safety. I've heard others on other threads here say "Follow your manufactures guide for towing capacity. Not everyone is running legal out here." But they did not supply proof of course.

    On the other hand, I've seen on multiple occasions, people add up their manufactures GVWR's for both Truck and Trailer. In this case respectively it would be 12,200 + 17,500 = 29,700. And thats the weight in which the combination is Registered with the DOT and what the DOT checks with when at the scale.

    So what is the law, Manufacturer or Registered? How much weight can legally be towed? How would I find this law?

    Thanks
     
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  3. Grumppy

    Grumppy Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    First, let me interject a bit of weight distribution info here. Remember that your truck is going to tote some of your payload weight, so you wont figure your entire weight only on the trailer.

    I'll try to make this simple.
    If you put 44,000 lb of product on a (18 wheeler) trailer, to be legal at the scales, your max weight on your trailer axles can only be 34,000. In this scenario, your truck is carrying 10,000 lb of your product.... therefore 10,000 lb has been transferred to your truck. (That's not even figuring the 10,000 lb or so from the weight of the trailer. I'm just trying to show some simple weight distribution math)
     
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  4. clausland

    clausland Road Train Member

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    Forget the pick-up scenario, unless you plan on just hauling occasionally or only very light loads. I'll get flak for saying this, but pick-ups just wont hold up to everyday pulling a loaded 40" gooseneck, unless you're always hauling very light loads. I don't care what Dodge, Ford or Chevy say. Can they do it, sure, but they'll be junk at 100k miles, if not sooner. The components just aren't made for that kind of work.

    For the same $$$, if not even cheaper, get yourself a class 7 rig, something like a IH 4900, w/DT466, 7 spd manual, a truck that's designed for this kind of work, with an engine that's designed to go 500k before an in frame. Setup right, your fuel mpg will be at least as good, if not better than the pick-ups, with a lot less headaches. Also, fewer worries about weight. Also, I like running old mechanical iron, holds up better, pre-emm, pre electronics, pre ELD, and I can work on it myself, but that's just me.

    I like the Big Tex trailers, they're not bad, if you can, get it with hydraulic over electric brakes, as opposed to straight electric. If buying a used one, regardless of what the seller says, check out the brakes real well, brake replacement gets real pricey, real quick, and the quickest way to get put OOS by DOT.

    Right now I'm running a '89 Chevy C70, but soon to be replaced by an IH 7100 w/DT466. It's a good local truck, but not designed for interstate work and the fuel mpg sucks bad.
    20210514_130715_HDR.jpg 20210608_125704.jpg
     
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  5. Lite bug

    Lite bug Road Train Member

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    Clausland makes a true picture of the Pickup scenario , this is coming from a guy ( Lite Bug ) who has 823,000 miles on a 2000 F350 . I had this truck when I decided to put it to work. His description of the truck he is looking for is the truck I could utilize and be much more profitable.
     
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  6. jamespmack

    jamespmack Road Train Member

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    @clausland

    Don't recall if I shared this with you. 90k gross no problem. But gas was cheap back then. 1998

    20210517_202100.jpg
    427 5 and a 2 speed rear. 3.5-4 mpg.
     
  7. Hotshot Newbie

    Hotshot Newbie Bobtail Member

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    @Grumppy , thanks for the insight. I am aware of load placement and adjusting the weight to be legal. In my 18 wheeler days, sliding the tandems to keep them under 34,000 LBS. Calculating taking on fuel but only so much to not have the rear drive axles go over 34,000 LBS.

    My question was more of legality one: 23,000 or 29,700 LBS. Manufacturer or not?

    @clausland , @jamespmack , thanks for the idea of those types of trucks; it would have to have a crew cab for me to sleep in. Like @Lite bug was confirming, that he is in fact getting the mileage out of his truck. With the pre-emissions Cummins, I am thinking above 600 - 700K miles as other do yes, a million miles and more on these Cummins engines. They even pass out a sweet badge for passing 1 and yes 2 Million miles. Granted, these Million Mile Ram-Cummins are typically pulling RV Campers professionally. And that is just what I am thinking in order to save up the money to purchase my BigTex Trailer. Going with this pickup will give me (cheaper) experience mechanically to take care of other rigs pickup or semi in years to come.

    But once again, my question is about the legality of the weight, not the equipment?
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2021
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  8. AModelCat

    AModelCat Road Train Member

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    Pre-emission would be pre-2003ish. EGR is emissions and, IMO, among the worst of it when looking solely at engine life.
     
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  9. Hotshot Newbie

    Hotshot Newbie Bobtail Member

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    Houston, TX
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    @AModelCat , In Dodge Ram's timeline of builds it is the trucks with the age of greater than 2007.5 with that to be concerned about. Beyond June 2007 a.k.a 2007.5, they introduced the 6.7 liter that replaced the 5.9 liter Cummins. At that point in time is where Dodge accommodated the EPA Emissions with the DPF filter and whatnot. So anything Dodge Ram 2007.5 and earlier is good.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2021
  10. jamespmack

    jamespmack Road Train Member

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    If you want to be real technical. 1997 was the first push on LoNox, 1972 was the clean air act that had trucking all spun up to.

    I think, if I recall C.A.R.B. in 1956 was imposing ideas on the auto industry.

    The real people who need shot.
     
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  11. clausland

    clausland Road Train Member

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    Heck my '75 ford f250 had, had, an EGR plate. But, here's the important thing to remember, when the EMP hits, the engines with point ignition will still run, and will be worth their weight in gold, provided you could get gasoline, somehow, to run them....
     
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