How to make an emission engine run more reliable

Discussion in 'Heavy Duty Diesel Truck Mechanics Forum' started by Jship, Oct 24, 2019.

  1. Jship

    Jship Bobtail Member

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    I know I will get a lot of slack but this has worked well in every truck I did it to.

    First remove thermostat , buy a new one. Before installing it drill three 3/8 holes in the side where it slides, use emery cloth or fine file to clean off all burs and clean it up. This allows engine to operate at a slightly cooler temperatures and help save engine if electrolysis happens and line push air into coolant system
    I found Diesel engine optimum ignition temp is about 174-178F (180-190 f) coolant temp the more you thin it after that the less efficient the combustion also help slow down corrosion in egr coolers so they last longer

    Next buy oil cooler with a fan install this but not in front of the rads it must be separate
    below or even behind cab and should be decent size

    Last buy oil cooler with fan for power steering fluid and remove from current cooling system if you have that style .

    I run a small electric fan on my rad in bottom corner but not a big deal if you don't. Just keeps fan from running all the time and constant on off during summer
    Truck Requires a bra in winter time in colder areas but small price for reliability
    If your hard core you can install a hood vent with fan for engine idling times make sure you install water catch ,
    Put this over egr cooler and/ or turbo put some shrouding to direct over them . This will help on hard pulls and idling
     
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  3. starmac

    starmac Road Train Member

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    OK, why do you think diesel burns more effeciently at 174 to 190 degrees, That goes against everything I ever thought I knew about diesel fuel?
     
  4. Cat sdp

    Cat sdp . .

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    Throw the erg cooler in the dump can and run a 190F thermostat with a winter front on during the winter.....
     
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  5. Crude Truckin'

    Crude Truckin' Alien Spacecraft

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    The hotter the engine, the more efficient it is.
     
  6. starmac

    starmac Road Train Member

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    We have our winter fronts custom made, as in insulated and quilted. I do not know if the cheap dealer ones you buy will do the same thing or not, but we have no choice but run them at the temps we run in, and even at 0 below, if I zip it fully closed and no air is hitting my cac, I will lose a lot of horse power and mileage goes straight down the tubes, I have even had this happen on a powerstroke pickup. Unless idling I have to have it open just a little bit.
     
  7. Hulld

    Hulld Road Train Member

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    Much like a woman the hotter she gets the less resistance...
     
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  8. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

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    I agree. No music on a cold engine. No siree. Wait until she warms up to the party with that natural fuel breathing engine.

    The hotter you get em the better they run.

    Diesel is processed by heating to compression to combust. That means get it really good and hot. Anything else is BS.

    If you have a good cooling system it will take care of itself in a range above 185 towards 205. Mr Pyro gets the rest.
     
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  9. Scoot 1971

    Scoot 1971 Light Load Member

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    Don't idle engine! It literally is that simple for the most part. Do whatever you have to be comfortable with engine shut down. APU, generator with a/c unit, windows down with screens or whatever.
    These engines and their epa mandated equipment will run so much better and longer by not idling.
    I've already started looking at options for when my Comfort Pro bites the dust and is cost prohibitive to fix or replace. I'm thinking a diesel fired generator in an aluminum box where current apu is plumbed to fuel tank with a bigger portable a/c secured to top bunk.
    After 4000 hrs, apu is still humming along great, but I just don't know for how much longer.
    The wife and I currently are in a 17' Cascadia, DD15 pushing 800000 miles with no issues. Heck, we still have original DPF in here. Been cleaned once at around 350000 miles.
    If I were looking at a used truck with all the current smog equipment, I would pay close attention to the idle hrs
     
  10. Scoot 1971

    Scoot 1971 Light Load Member

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    Btw, if you are a company driver assigned to a truck with no apu, idle the hell out of that engine!
     
  11. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

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    We usually idled at 1100. And upwards of 1600 in winter depending on severity of temp (No winter front) by computer cruise idle set. As a team truck in 2000-2001 with a Detriot we probably put on a little over 8000 hours on the engine in 10 months flat for 210,000 miles run. IF we had to sit somewhere like Salinas we would idle the engine at 900. It was enough to support the inverter etc.

    The one thing I do miss about that particular truck was how consistent it was. Once in a while it eats a alternator or throws a auto trans fit. However after the time we had with it it was time to give it to some solo who thinks hes getting a new truck. But one rode hard and put up wet.

    In the old iron when you could idle high no one would have said a word about it. And the engines ran forever.

    However if you idled it at 600 or whatever it does nothing at all for it. Builds up all sorts of problems. And this was before anything like the emissions stuff.

    Fuel mileage was less important than having full tanks when needed to. Even then 6.8 or so in the newer rigs and around 5 for the old iron. 40+ years of trucks as they were built and the fuel economy is essentially the same.
     
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