new frieghtliner cascadia truck

Discussion in 'Trucks [ Eighteen Wheelers ]' started by rook75, May 4, 2007.

  1. rook75

    rook75 Bobtail Member

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    Apr 13, 2007
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    Freightliner unveils new on-highway truck
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]By Avery Vise [/FONT]


    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Freightliner launched the Cascadia in grand fashion Wednesday, May 2, at a press event in Charlotte, N.C.[/FONT]
    Freightliner Trucks on Wednesday, May 2, revealed the Cascadia, a new Class 8 on-highway tractor that goes into production in August. The Cascadia, which will replace the current Columbia and Century Class trucks in 2010, offers a 3 percent improvement in fuel economy over previous models and was designed to accommodate DaimlerChrysler's new global heavy-duty engine platform, the Portland, Ore.-based truck maker says. Detroit Diesel will launch the new platform -- designed to meet 2010 U.S. environmental regulations -- late this year.

    “Our customers are faced with the consequences of ever-tightening emissions standards, higher fuel prices, rapidly escalating wages and benefits, and a dire shortage of maintenance technicians,” said Freightliner LLC President and CEO Chris Patterson in announcing the new truck.

    In addition to improved fuel economy, the Cascadia addresses these concerns through improved serviceability to reduce vehicle downtime and improved cab comfort and ergonomics to help fleets attract and retain drivers, Patterson said.

    To achieve the improvements in fuel economy, the more than 1 million engineering hours included 2,500 hours in Freightliner’s full-scale wind tunnel. “Our wind tunnel was constructed expressly for this kind of new model development,” Patterson said. “Apparently tiny tweaks in the design made possible by our unlimited use of our own facility can save owners hundreds of dollars in fuel consumption over the life of their truck.”

    In addition to aerodynamics, fuel-saving features of the Cascadia include an integrated battery-powered auxiliary HVAC system and an engine cooling system that minimizes engine fan and air-conditioning compressor on-time.

    Serviceability features include improved diagnostics, an HVAC system designed to reduce repair frequency, breakaway side extenders, a roped-in windshield that can be changed in minutes, extended-life headlamp bulbs and easier access to engine and accessory components, Freightliner says.

    Cab design followed extensive research into driver wants and needs, Freightliner says. The Cascadia features double door and window seals, improved engine and cab mounts, additional insulation and a hydraulic clutch to reduce vibration and road noise. It also offers larger seats, larger door openings for easy entry and egress, more head and belly room, and easier-to-use switches and climate controls, the truck maker adds. Freightliner’s rack and pinion steering system is intended to improve durability through lower system pressure and temperature and to provide quicker steering response and reduced steering effort.

    Cascadia specs include:


    GVWRs of 35,000 to 71,000 lbs. with a GCWR of 92,000 lbs.;
    Detroit Diesel Series 60 engine, 455 hp is standard; an MBE 4000 with ratings of 370 to 450 hp and Caterpillar C15 with ratings of 435 to 550 hp are available;
    EatonFuller manual transmission is standard; UltraShift and AutoShift transmissions are available;
    Standard front taperleaf suspension rated at 12,000 lbs.; optional spring suspension rated at 14,600 lbs.; and
    Standard rear AirLiner suspension rated at 40,000 lbs.; optional AirLiner suspension rated at 21,000 lbs.
     
  2. Roadhound

    Roadhound Light Load Member

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    Jan 31, 2007
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    That thing looks a lot like the Peterbilt 387 and the Kenworth T-2000.
     
  3. Burky

    Burky Road Train Member

    It would look a lot more like a Freightliner if it had a horizontal bar or two missing from the front grille.
     
  4. dstockwell

    dstockwell Light Load Member

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    Oct 11, 2006
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  5. Roadhound

    Roadhound Light Load Member

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    I understand fuel economy, but the is just so much aerodynamic ability a high rise sleeper truck is going to have, so I wonder why the EPA pushes them so hard? They don't say anything about the 5 gallons per mile a train gets or the 75,000 gallons a container ship uses from Singapore to Miami.
     
  6. Burky

    Burky Road Train Member

    They aren't pushed by the EPA as much as they are their customer base. First, the EPA has virtually no jurisdiction over trains and none at all over ships. Comparatively, on a ton of freight per mile basis, the rough figures have always been a 1-10-100 ration between ships, trains, and trucks. What a ship moves on a gallon, a train moves on 10, and a truck moves on 100. that's also roughly the cost basis per ton-mile as well. But a ship can only deliber to an ocean side dock, a train only delivers to a tracked location, and a truck delivers anyplace those two can't get to.

    Actually, the demand for fuel mileage comes from customers. If you are the guy at Swift who figures out how to spec a truck and save 1/10th of a mpg over the life of the truck, multiplying that times 18,000 trucks and 125,000 miles per year, you get the corner office and the secretary with loose morals. Saving 1/10th of a gallon is nice for an O/O, but it's big money when it is saved on corporate trucks. And with fuel cost rising as it is, this becomes more important still.
     
  7. Roadhound

    Roadhound Light Load Member

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    I would have thought that the EPA would have control over the railways since they are government controled. I had heard a rumor several months ago that the new locomotives would be standard with emission controled engines like we have in the trucks.
     
  8. Burky

    Burky Road Train Member

    They are government regulated, but that is not quite the same thing as being government controlled. And in the grand scheme of things, there are a lot fewer trains to regulate, and they have a very long lifespan, so some of the older ones will be in service until most of us depart the planet. So while there are improvements coming up in trains, it's more a voluntary thing driven by customer demand. And if I may, let me point out that a current generation diesel truck engine puts out less than 2% of the emissions of an engine from 1995. The EPA's job in trucking is done, and we are long past the point of diminishing returns.

    Most of that improvement comes from improved fuel controls and electronics that can monitor and control the engines fuel intake through the combustion and rpm cycle. Trains will benefit in the same way, but it takes a little bit longer to come to pass. In fact, they have learned from the test bed that is trucking how to improve their engines and their fuel use.
     
  9. Roadhound

    Roadhound Light Load Member

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    I understand we need to change our habits as a country to try and make for a healthier living enviroment, especially for our kids, but I also have some mixed feelings about the major "crunch" on truck emissions here lately. It seems to me that the EPA wants too much too fast. Just like the new engine for 2008, the Ultra Low Sulfer engine. Because of weery buyers of the new trucks, a lot of people have lost their job because of layoffs from truck and engine manufacturers, and I guess I have a bias opinion because I have friends with families that got laid off.
     
  10. dwheelwonder

    dwheelwonder Bobtail Member

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    Jun 14, 2007
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    What do you think about the aerodynamics stuff? with the cascadia. I mean, I think it looks pretty good. I kinda liked taht 360 spin thing on the ftl site. But does that really translate into better mileage?
     
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