NRR Transportation - Canadian East Indian company

Discussion in 'Canadian Truckers Forum' started by Cree trucker, Feb 5, 2017.

  1. canadian

    canadian Light Load Member

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    If we could get the speed limiters removed from trucking in Ontario, drivers would be able to pull the trailers out of their precarious slides and jacknifes they get into. The problem with Ontario is the high winds, Moose, and slippery conditions. Combine that with a governed truck with only the brake pedal and steering at your disposal and your up #### creek without a paddle trying to re-balance the weight and grip between truck and trailer front to back and side to side. Without an ability to stay ahead of the trailer (governed truck, remember) a jackknife and a nap in the ditch is surely imminent.
     
  2. canadian

    canadian Light Load Member

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    I'll take that as a compliment. Let's take our profession back. Make trucking great again.

    But seriously you prove nothing by attacking me, add nothing to the conversation, are just attacking me Ad hominem .

    If you got a point, state it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018
  3. Jazz1

    Jazz1 Road Train Member

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    You obviously cant drive worth a fiddlers ####. Stay the heck out of Ontario if that's your excuse for not being able to maintain control of a truck.
     
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  4. not4hire

    not4hire Road Train Member

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    Umm... no.
     
  5. Cree trucker

    Cree trucker Bobtail Member

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    Who would have the balls?
    On another note, if I'm sitting for 1,2,3, days 2 pick up 2 pickups, every day I sit I potential lose $350 per day, not a layover pay.
     
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  6. Jazz1

    Jazz1 Road Train Member

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    Time to change employers. Its costing you money to work there. Good Luck
     
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  7. canadian

    canadian Light Load Member

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    If you're sitting unpaid for days then it's time to change up who you work for. Your employer needs to take the loads and not cherry-pick the loads at your expense. You're entitled to severance pay and an ROE.
     
  8. Canucklehead

    Canucklehead Light Load Member

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    If you don't own your own truck, and you're a driver instead:
    DO NOT sign any contract, run, don't walk.
    You become a subcontractor, therefore the company doesn't have to pay matching contributions for IE or CPP. You pay the full freight yourself, eg, double what's taken out of your paychecks now. The company also doesn't have to pay for your WCB. Therefore, unless you open an account with them, and pay the rate you fall under, not only are you breaking the law, you're also SOL if you get injured.
    As an employee, aka company driver, the only things you have to sign are the usual 20 page boiler plate employment packages.Usually for stating everything you filled out was true, permission for the company to contact previous employers for references and release of drug test info, plus sometimes a list of thou shall nots that you sign that you've read them, sometimes company procedures are written down and another signature that you've read them, etc etc etc. But, even if it mentions rate per mile or whatever else, companies can squirm their way out of those any time they want. It is not a full out legal contract where they are legally beholden to it. Basically it's you signing everything, not them.
    If you're an owner/op, then yes, those are full binding contracts on both parties. Best to have a lawyer take a look before you sign. But even then, companies will F you over any chance they get. That's why small claims court is filled with truckers chasing the companies for their pay.

    Good luck
     
  9. Zeviander

    Zeviander Road Train Member

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    If you drove the speed limit, you'd have 15 km/h of play room above your cruising speed. And if the conditions are less than ideal, you shouldn't be driving at 90 km/h anyways. Especially not in Ontario in a 100,000-137,000lb truck.
     
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  10. canadian

    canadian Light Load Member

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    Jan 8, 2010
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    I agree that under less than ideal conditions reduced speed is in order, and often this requires planning a team to move the load instead of running single due to the slower speeds required in transit to the destination. Most trucks nowadays have ESC built in so bumping the governor isn't as huge an issue as it used to be because ESC sends air pressure to individual axle brakes in an attempt to line up the tractor to the trailer again. Wheel speed doesn't necessarily translate into road speed which is why I prefer an unlocked truck, so that there is no risk of bumping the governor during any sort of wheel spin. Granted this sort of situation should be prevented in the first place, and it's a 1/100,000,000 chance of ever happening if driving to conditions on good winter tires. I've had "seasoned veterans" follow too closely because I'm doing 60km/h and not 90km/hr on roads that are so icy I can barely stand on them without falling. They tell me I'm going "too slow."

    I suppose the principle I want readers to take away from this is that drivers should have full control of their trucks, and a governor goes against that principle. There are also court battles in Ontario testifying that ungoverned trucks are safer than governed trucks. As with guns so it is with trucks. Trucks don't kill people, drivers do.

    Putting a governor on the truck just says loud and clear you don't trust the driver you hired to do a good job. You hired us to do a good job for you, so let us professional drivers do just that. Pride, polish, courteous safe driving, and professionalism should be the default an employer can trust will be the norm of their job performance and expectations from the public of what a driver is today in trucking.
     
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