placard questions

Discussion in 'Questions From New Drivers' started by bowmeyer1, Feb 23, 2009.

  1. bowmeyer1

    bowmeyer1 Light Load Member

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    well i guess that screws me for haulin the 10,000 lb of oxidizers over the state line with just a generic placard. oh well better to learn here than with a ticket....just in case i went around the scales anyway. but i will note this 8820lb rule for future reference....although.....i was given a small hazardous materials book ( not the er guide ) and would like to just say..if its a ##$% rule it outa be in the book. they aint paying me enough to be some danged hazmat lawyer. so i got it......1001 lb rule........2250 rule.or some crap like that.....and 8820 or more requires the un number in the middle of the placard.
     
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  3. RickG

    RickG Road Train Member

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    A lot of the responsibility falls on the shipper to have the paperwork right and provide proper placards . There is supposed to be a place on the bill of lading to be initialed saying placards were provided .
     
  4. psanderson

    psanderson Road Train Member

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    In the rules, it is the consignors/shippers responsibility to provide the proper placards with either the orange panel or the UN/NA number on the placard (assuming the UN/NA number is required in non bulk....bulk would in essence usually always require the number because of the volume of material being transported even if the volume is merely outage..outage is defined as less than 2% of volume). This rule essentially gets the motor carrier off the hook if a citation were issued for improper placarding in that the carrier can go back to the consignor/shipper and demand payment for the citation for not providing the proper placard.
     
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  5. psanderson

    psanderson Road Train Member

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    There may be a problem with my previous statement in that carriers that contract to haul for businesses like GM, Chrysler, Ford, Mazda, and many other businesses are required to sign an indemnification clause with those business that many times protects not only them, but their manufacturing suppliers as well. If the carrier doesn't sign the indemnification clause, the the carrier can't pull their freight.

    I am aware of a carrier contracted to one of these businesses whose driver was hurt on the manufacturing company property. The business denied any coverage to the driver & it went to court (the driver sued). The indemnification clause was entered into the litigation and the business won. It caused the carrier to pay for the injury.
     
  6. Mortar Man

    Mortar Man Road Train Member

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    It depends

    If the product has a RQ = REPORTABLE QUANTITY then you MUST display the UN number ..

    If the product does not have a RQ and is not in bulk containers you should be able to get by with the Corrosive tag..
    However always check your MSDS and SHIPPING papers and back it up with your ERG book ..(EMERGENCY RESPONSE GUIDE)

    The weight over 1000 pounds does classify it as HAZMAT but the way to label it depends If you want to be safe next time you can take a BLACK MARKER look up the product in your ERG book and write the UN# in large print on the CORROSIVE placqard this is leagl and better safe than sorry
     
  7. Mortar Man

    Mortar Man Road Train Member

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    First as I should have stated above but forgot

    Check your HAZMAT GUIDE BOOK (the little grey book) for your UN# and classification. There are 9 hazard classes.

    It is the shippers responsability to classify the product correctly but it is also the drivers to double check before pulling product. After you leave you have verified that it is classified and marked correctly in the laws eyes

    Once you check the UN# and hazard class then back it up with the ERG book and double check the MSDS (material saftery data sheet) and the SHIPPING PAPERS for the RQ or a X in the HAZMAT section of the bills


    Hope this helps..
     
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  8. Mortar Man

    Mortar Man Road Train Member

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    You are correct

    but you mst check it and verify the MSDS and Shipping papers especially if the shipper makes you sign a realease as most do now.
    The law only protects you till you sign on to pull the load.. once accepted the responsiablity falls on CARRIER which will be passed to the DRIVER as we all know..

    But you are correct as they way the LAW reads..
     
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  9. Mortar Man

    Mortar Man Road Train Member

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    Yeah you gotta watch that as shippers are getting sneaky now to limit liability...

    :yes2557:
     
  10. bowmeyer1

    bowmeyer1 Light Load Member

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    i have since reading this to find from a chemical company that this is the exact truth.....thanks for your help.....it saved my butt!
     
  11. ironpony

    ironpony Road Train Member

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    It may be their responsibility to provide it, but in reality it's up to the driver to make sure it happens. It's your keister and CDL that's on the line.

    Tip... keep your old hazmat placards. If the shipper doesn't have the proper placard, it'll save you a ton of time to have it yourself - and not have to wait on them to do their duty. It also helps to have extras when one of them blows off of your trailer.
     
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