Rookie Mixer Driver

Discussion in 'Questions From New Drivers' started by ZTicondria, Mar 12, 2015.

  1. ZTicondria

    ZTicondria Bobtail Member

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    Feb 13, 2015
    Wayne, PA
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    Thanks Fireman5523. Yea I have been watching videos and they dont seem to drastically different than a car manual except for the driver being the synchro instead of the trans. I practiced no clutch shifting in my car this morning but it's horrible for the syncro's so I only did it for a little bit. It seems quite fun actually and I am really excited for it. It's in my blood and it's time to do what I was born to do!
     
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  3. fireman5523

    fireman5523 Light Load Member

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    Feb 12, 2012
    Little Rock, Arkansas
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    Just put a little pressure on the stick before you let off the gas and it'll slide right out. Just gotta get your timing right to get it back in.
     
  4. ZTicondria

    ZTicondria Bobtail Member

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    Feb 13, 2015
    Wayne, PA
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    That's what I have noticed. All about the timing since the driver is essentially the sychronizer for the transmission.
     
  5. 201

    201 Road Train Member

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    high plains colorado
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    Actually, shifting a synchromesh trans. without the clutch, like in your car, won't be the same as a non-synchro, like in a truck. Got a lot more spinning in a synchromesh trans. You'll be fine.
     
    ZTicondria Thanks this.
  6. ZTicondria

    ZTicondria Bobtail Member

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    Feb 13, 2015
    Wayne, PA
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    [QUOTE="semi" retired;4501483]Actually, shifting a synchromesh trans, like in your car, won't be the same as a non-synchro, like in a truck. Got a lot more spinning in a synchromesh trans. You'll be fine.[/QUOTE]

    Oh, that's good to know. That's really the biggest part im worried about is the driving portion. The loads etc I understand. I know slow and steady is best and I also know not to mess with turns period.
     
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  7. MickTrucker

    MickTrucker Bobtail Member

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    Mar 12, 2015
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    lol congrats and good luck
     
    ZTicondria Thanks this.
  8. REO6205

    REO6205 Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    Feb 15, 2014
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    The hardest part about driving a mixer? Getting along with the job foreman. Learning what he wants and how you position the truck to meet his needs is important.
    If you're running the controls from inside the truck watch whoever is designated as your signal man. Same if you're working at the back of the truck. Don't day dream. When they want the flow shut off they want it as soon as they signal.
    If you're doing an interrupted pour, side walk segments say, and you're having to constantly watch the signals, stop the barrel, and keep moving the truck ahead you're in for some work. Get an Ace bandage for your left knee....you'll need it.
    When you get a pump job where all you have to do is short chute into a pump hopper you'll think it's easy by comparison.
    Oh, and get used to being wet. Washing down after loading, spraying the chutes while you're unloading, washing down after unloading, cleaning your chutes, washing out your barrel when you get back to the plant....you'll see why that water tank is so big.

    And for what it's worth, my total mixer experience is about 3 months. That was enough. LOL
     
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  9. Gunrunner84

    Gunrunner84 Light Load Member

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    Feb 9, 2008
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    And Always lock your chute before taking off down the road. Good luck. I just got called back here from being off all winter.....
     
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  10. JReding

    JReding Road Train Member

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    Does the rear discharge mixer have a rear booster axle? One thing to note, that rear booster is capable of up to 12,000 lbs. of pressure. It's been many years since I drive one, but I remember my training, and was glad I never had to do it, but; know exactly where your switch to raise that rear booster is, in the event of a steer tire blowout. If it happens, you hit that switch as fast as you can. When that steer tire blows, the rear booster will sense a decrease in pressure, then start pushing down more, potentially rolling your truck over, especially at highway speed.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2015
    ZTicondria Thanks this.
  11. ZTicondria

    ZTicondria Bobtail Member

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    Feb 13, 2015
    Wayne, PA
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    Luckily it doesnt appear that the vehicles ill drive have rear boosters, just one tag axle in front of the drive wheels, but I also haven't been to see them in person yet.
     
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