The difference between commission and hourly pay

Discussion in 'Experienced Truckers' Advice' started by Diantane, Jun 19, 2017.

  1. Diantane

    Diantane Light Load Member

    87
    104
    Nov 13, 2010
    Alderson, WV
    0
    Used to work for a mega company that paid me 0.39 CPM. They told me that it was a lot so I believed them. Problem was when you are still doing company stuff like waiting to get loaded, fueling, scaling, swapping trailers, looking for an empty, etc, your pay just stops. After 18 months with them and making only about $26,000 a year I did a little math. Divide the amount of money you earned for the week by the hours you worked. Came to $8.33 an hour. Gave them my two weeks notice.

    Then I started looking for an OTR company that paid by the hour. It was tough to get through to the companies that actually do this (when you put hourly pay in the search box, dozens of commission only companies pop up). With some extra effort I found a few companies that actually paid by the hour and I'm not talking the ones that make you offload your truck all day and night (hired laborer that also drives the truck). I do exactly what I did for the last company (drive), but my pay is a lot more.

    Their base rate was about $16 an hour for new drivers, but with my experience they started me out at $18.50. After 40 hours that goes up to $27.75 and we always hit overtime by Wednesday afternoon (third day of the work week). I always get at least 30 hours of overtime a week. Should make over $85,000 my first year.

    Last week I had to pick up a load that took the shipper 11 hours. I was on overtime so I earned over $300 for sleeping, eating, playing games on my computer, etc. If I was still with the mega company I would have made only $45. You see the difference? Making commission is a rip off. If you speed you will get caught and your insurance goes up. Who needs that? I take my time if there's a lot of traffic, but otherwise I go whatever the speed limit is up to 75.

    Will never drive for a commission only company again!
     
  2. Puppage

    Puppage Road Train Member

    2,909
    3,571
    Aug 2, 2012
    Connecticut
    0
  3. STexan

    STexan Road Train Member

    10,063
    17,916
    Oct 3, 2011
    Longview, TX
    0
    You're talking about one side of the pay-by-mile model but there are other options where you're actually running most of the time and on your schedule.

    You're problem was mostly too much sitting, not the pay model. You can't lump all OTR jobs into that scenario. I'm paid mileage too but I'll be paid for between 140-150k miles per year and that's my preferred way of running. OTR is not for everybody and OTR jobs at the megas should probably not be considered a "lifetime job" anyway.
     
    gentleroger and crappiejunkie Thank this.
  4. Diantane

    Diantane Light Load Member

    87
    104
    Nov 13, 2010
    Alderson, WV
    0
    Some of the drivers said they were sitting a bit, but my next load came within 100-150 miles of getting to the final delivery of the existing load. It was slow only 3 weekend days in 18 months. Averaged 2700 to 3300 miles a week.

    Another issue was getting home. Only got seven days home within 18 months. Took 4.5 months to go on a doctor's appointment. This after them telling me that a driver's time at home was very important to them. Sure, the recruiter will tell you that lie.
     
  5. crappiejunkie

    crappiejunkie Wishin' I was fishin'

    2,624
    8,491
    Mar 9, 2014
    In a van down by the River.
    0
    I make more than that as a yard dog, with overtime and darn good benefits and 2 weeks vaca, been there 8 months. Most weekends off.And I am in my own bed everyday (work third shift)
     
  6. gokiddogo

    gokiddogo Road Train Member

    5,509
    6,653
    Mar 5, 2012
    Ontario Canada
    0
    You know what I find interesting about drivers.... A lot of them want to be paid for everything they do, if I offer say 0.53 hub miles all in pay... they complain they don't get paid for sitting a few extra hours at a customer or paid to scale and adjust a heavy load or border crossing or getting inspected at the scale etc etc etc... If I say what about I pay you $30 per pick or drop + $15/hr after you eat 2 for free + scale/adjust heavy loads + .45/mi ...they want the latter. At the end of the year they have both done the same job and made the same amount of money. In their head somehow they are further ahead with scenario 2. Whatever. Just don't hit anything or get any tickets and take care of my equipment and we will get along just fine.

    26k is ridiculous. Full time QUALITY otr drivers should be in the 70+ neighborhood.
     
  7. Diantane

    Diantane Light Load Member

    87
    104
    Nov 13, 2010
    Alderson, WV
    0
    I've been home every weekend starting on Friday afternoon with this new company since I started.
     
  8. Diantane

    Diantane Light Load Member

    87
    104
    Nov 13, 2010
    Alderson, WV
    0
    Well in a few years we'll all be doing something else when the robots take over trucking. I'll be retired by then.
     
  9. "semi" retired

    "semi" retired Road Train Member

    4,671
    6,026
    Apr 16, 2014
    wisconsin
    0
    It's too bad it took you a year and a half to realize that. Actually, .39 cpm is pretty standard today, even on the high side, as some places still offer only .31. An hourly OTR is indeed rare, but not unheard of, with modern recording devices today. In my career, probably 50/50, % vs hourly, and obviously, hourly is the way to go. Took me a while. I'd say, for the 1st ten years, I did %, and wasn't until the mid 80's, I got my 1st local, hourly trucking job, but NEVER any OT. For some stupid reason, employers of trucking companies do not have to pay OT.
     
  10. snowwy

    snowwy Road Train Member

    13,345
    5,123
    Jul 6, 2009
    0
    I've heard of sales commission. never heard of truck commission. unless you're selling trucks.
     
    Puppage Thanks this.
  • Draft saved Draft deleted