Tires on a trailer

Discussion in 'Questions From New Drivers' started by Jay john, Mar 13, 2020.

  1. Moose1958

    Moose1958 Road Train Member

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    My opinion only!! I think the primary reason is the high turnover rates. A carrier is not going to spend the money to do this. Besides after paying out for all the damages drivers are doing, there really is not a whole lot left. I honestly think this entire industry model is close to a total collapse. I am just glad I am out of the shooting range. This industry used to not be this way.
     
    SmallPackage Thanks this.
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  3. jammer910Z

    jammer910Z Road Train Member

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    That's how most of us old Codgers out here got into the biz.
    There was no school for us.
    Chauffeurs license and some good scoldings from guys that are now long underground. (Rest their Souls!)
     
  4. pmdriver

    pmdriver Road Train Member

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    I would be concerned if the weather was turning the roads slick, you may want as much rubber on the road evenly to keep the ship straight. If the weather was not bad anywhere on trips run em. They have to get rid of them tires somehow.
     
  5. Moose1958

    Moose1958 Road Train Member

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    I would also point out to be VERY mindful of part 393.75 (g) with regard to mismatched tires. I just had this pointed out to me by a DOT officer. They can and will bust a driver with mismatched tires on the same tandem and one tire is overloaded because of it. In Virginia, they do use portable scales.

    (g) Tire loading restrictions (except on manufactured homes). No motor vehicle (except manufactured homes, which are governed by paragraph (h) of this section) shall be operated with tires that carry a weight greater than that marked on the sidewall of the tire or, in the absence of such a marking, a weight greater than that specified for the tires in any of the publications of any of the organizations listed in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 119 (49 CFR 571.119, S5.1(b)) unless:

    (1) The vehicle is being operated under the terms of a special permit issued by the State; and

    (2) The vehicle is being operated at a reduced speed to compensate for the tire loading in excess of the manufacturer's rated capacity for the tire. In no case shall the speed exceed 80 km/hr (50 mph).
     
  6. AModelCat

    AModelCat Road Train Member

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    I'm confused @Moose1958, I'm not seeing anything there about mismatched tires.

    Edit: Nevermind, I see what you're saying now.
     
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