Haulin Logs

Discussion in 'Ask An Owner Operator' started by Big Road Skateboard, Aug 18, 2022.

  1. Big Road Skateboard

    Big Road Skateboard Road Train Member

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  3. kranky1

    kranky1 Road Train Member

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    Such as? It’s different by region, methods and equipment kind of develop by environment. End goal is always the same, get the wood out of the bush.
     
  4. DrBigRig

    DrBigRig Light Load Member

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    You will want to tell your accountant to depreciate your truck at a higher rate of depreciation when hauling logs. If the normal rate of depreciation is 20%, you will want to go 30%. Depreciation is a tax exempt expense.
     
  5. AModelCat

    AModelCat Road Train Member

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    Grew up around it. Pretty much grew up in the passenger seat lol.
     
  6. Big Road Skateboard

    Big Road Skateboard Road Train Member

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    I figure with the economy slowing way down lots of folks are gonna quit that too, and i always thought it would be something i would enjoy.

    Equipment prices will be down, so it'll be a good time to buy.

    But who do you work for, the mill?
    Is it something a guy could do interstate? I like the idea of spending time working in different areas. Northwest through summer, back home or further southeast for winter.

    And obviously curious about pay. Most around here are barely gettin down the road, so it makes me question if it would be a viable investment.

    In the end, I'd rather make a bit less while enjoying work, than make more but hate it. I'm still enjoying the flatbed i'm doing now, so i'm in no rush. But if it's something feasible i would buy equipment while it's down.
     
  7. AModelCat

    AModelCat Road Train Member

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    Equipment really varies by region. You'd best research the area you plan to haul in before you rig up for it. West coast mountains aren't really suitable for hayracks and b-trains but newer bush roads are built to accomodate them nowadays. A standard highway spec truck doesn't really cut it in the bush. You need ground clearance, full lockers and heavier specs. Bush roads will shake a light truck apart pretty quick if you don't take it easy.

    Not sure how it works in the US. Here in Canada, from what I recall, mills get an annual allowable cut from the government and they tender that out to logging contractors. The loggers either do everything stump to dump or they hire out the trucking portion to a company or individual owner ops. Bear in mind I've been away from the industry for a decade now so it may be different these days.
     
  8. kranky1

    kranky1 Road Train Member

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    That’s something you’d want to look at for a second tractor. An older one that you could pull the plate off and shove against the fence for a few months at a time with no pain. Because lumber is a market commodity it’s patchy, similar to oilfield work. Then you have to think about equipment spec. There’s no such thing as a one size fits all logging truck. S.E I think work mostly long trailers. Michigan uses long trailers with lots of axles under them. Mix and match through the west but once you’re into the Pacific N.W you’re into west coast log rig. Any of those would leave you a tractor to do whatever you want with except the west coast rig. Swap the forestry headboard for something lighter and go. West coast log rig you’re parked until there’s more wood if it slows up. Forestry oriented high boys for long wood or pulp usually have pockets for the stakes. Leave the stakes at home it’s a high boy. Forestry contractors would be the place to hunt up work, or the mills direct but that’s a little more involved than working with a contractor. The work can be challenging, but the money is there for that reason. Pays by the cubic these days. If you’re the kind of guy will max the truck out every trip, and can get in and out without being pulled off the hills all the time or ####ing the road up there’s no problem to make money. You’re doing it the right way, a little research goes a long way. But again it’s similar to oilfield, a little bit specialized, and it can be going wide open today and come to a screeching halt tomorrow with no warning or apparent reason. Think about the second truck route, if you had a second working in the bush a few months a year it wouldn’t be the worst thing that happened to you whether you drove it yourself or hired a driver.
     
  9. KrumpledTed

    KrumpledTed Light Load Member

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    It works pretty much the same down here. Some guys will work for the mills directly though but most guys haul for a forestry contractor in some capacity.

    I agree on the truck completely. Only truck I’d look at these days for that work would be a KW, either T800 or W900. Full lockers, dual steer boxes, 16000 or 20000 lb steer axle, at least heavy frame but double frame would be my choice, Hendrickson Primaxx rear suspension if I’m trying to keep my kidneys where they are or Ultimaxx if the logs are in the 7th circle of Hell… that’s just a truck I’d build for stuff in AR/MS/LA. Probably overbuilt for our kind of logging down here but it is what it is.
     
  10. AModelCat

    AModelCat Road Train Member

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    Pretty standard spec up here is an 18k lb steer axle w/dual boxes or assist cylinder (we can only scale up to 7,500 kg or 16,500 lbs on the steer IIRC). 46k/69k lb rears with 4 or 6 way lockers (depending if tridrive or tandem), heavy spec air ride, 24.5 rubber, 500+ hp, 18 speed and single heavy frame rails.

    These used to be the most common configuration here before the mills decided they wanted short logs. Quad wagons just don't look as nice as a long log setup IMO.
    72987-1.jpg
     
  11. KrumpledTed

    KrumpledTed Light Load Member

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    I hadn’t even thought about tri-drives. But that’s a lot more wild country out west and up north! I assume keeping single frame rails would help with articulation on a tri-drive?
     
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