New Trucks

Discussion in 'Ask An Owner Operator' started by istumped, Sep 24, 2021.

  1. istumped

    istumped Medium Load Member

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    Ok we have all heard the bad of New trucks. Emissions this Emissions that basically. So let's here the good. How old was the old truck when you traded up? Will you keep what you got? Trade every 3-5 yrs? Your thoughts.
     
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  3. istumped

    istumped Medium Load Member

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    On my 4th truck(bought new). 3 others before where used. Should have bought new after 1st truck.
     
  4. Ridgeline

    Ridgeline Road Train Member

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    You know what, if these trucks were so bad, then there would be hundreds and hundreds of them sitting on dealers lots and in scrap yards.

    what some, not all but just some people have issues with them is dealing with mechanics who are clueless to how to fix them right and fast.
     
  5. Happily Retired

    Happily Retired Road Train Member

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    I think, for the most part, new trucks are engineering marvels, with features many of us old timers only dreamed about. We have to remember, like all "assembled" products, they are only as good as the human being that's assembling them. Trucks have gotten to the point where even the most non-mechanical person can operate them. With a few exceptions, they ( new trucks) haul probably 95% of this country's freight, not older trucks. With repair costs, lack of parts, fuel economy, and downtime, an older truck doesn't make any sense today.
     
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  6. RStewart

    RStewart Road Train Member

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    Norman, OK
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    The problem with the new emissions trucks is the emissions systems are only good for about 500k miles. Take off that stuff and the trucks aren't much different than the old trucks that normally ran a million miles and more with just maintenance being done. Buying brand new is the best way to get money out of an emissions truck. When buying a used emissions truck you're usually getting the truck right before issues start with it. Buying a used truck regardless of age and miles one needs to have a healthy bank account for repairs and downtime. I had 3 sensors go out on me a couple weeks ago. The shop bill was $1854 but the expensive part was the $6k I missed out on because I was down for a week. If a person was to learn for the emissions work and actually consider the sensors and such as regular maintenance items so they get replaced before they fail a lot of issues can be avoided but that does increase maintenance costs versus a pre emissions truck. I hadn't got all my sensors replaced and it cost me. It's always cheaper to repair the truck on your terms.
     
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  7. RStewart

    RStewart Road Train Member

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    I would agree if you're comparing a brand new emissions truck to an old truck. As my post above shows, a used emissions truck is worse than an old pre emissions truck. I was down for a week because of parts that aren't on a pre emissions truck. When you compare a used emissions truck to a pre emissions truck, fuel mileage is about the only place that the emissions truck gains an advantage and that's not always the case. So yes, to a lot of people buying an old pre emissions truck makes a lot of sense.
     
  8. Six9GS

    Six9GS Heavy Load Member

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    I can't speak alot to trucks specifically. I don't feel I'm experienced enough to have an opinion with any real validity behind it. That said, I do have some thoughts.
    As with cars, if you can work on them, probably cheaper to buy used. Only caveat to that is with cars, you're usually close to home, can have a reasonably equipped garage giving you both a place to work on them and the things needed. With trucks, seems you're subject to available service where you happen to be. Probably rare to actually break down close to home where you have the place and tools needed. Might be able to have a general bag of tools with you, but not enough to really tear into a truck to repair many problems.
    So, seems to me with a truck, it is going to be common that someone else will do the repair work for many things. New trucks have pretty decent warranties as I understand, so the new truck warranties will usually cover those costs, compared to out of pocket with an older truck.
    IDK, I've driven 'junkers' almost my whole life and lack of a car payment always made them cheaper. I can work on them, and have. First time in my life I had to have a mechanic work on one of my vehicles is when I was 54. I was living in an apartment complex and didn't have the place to work on the car, so had to bite the bullet and pay someone else to repair it (99 Buick LaSabre power steering pump). My favorite junkers were a 68 Skylark I had for 12 years and a 79 3/4 ton GMC cargo van (had a 250 straight 6 with a 1 barrel carb and 3 speed on the tree. Don't get much simpler than that and that's what I loved about it). I've had too many others to mention, but definitely have a preference to old Buicks.
    Anyway, I'm a company driver at Swift and we always have newer trucks in our fleet. I'm currently in a 2019 Volvo with 329,000 miles. She had 166,000 when I was seated in her. With only 329,000 she is just getting broken in. But, already know that within a year, I'll be reseated into a newer truck. Just the way they do their fleet management. Given the way I am about vehicles, I'd gladly stay in this same truck for 6 more years or till she had 1,000,000 and ready for her first major overhaul.
    As for driver preference, new is kinda nice. But I tend to like older vehicles with a bit of character. You know, one that has those things that work OK, but not exactly perfectly and like it's supposed to. Those things you have to finiggle to get to work.
    Lastly, newer trucks are much more efficient in general and pollute a heck of alot less. From a macro scale, they are simply better, IMHO.
     
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  9. istumped

    istumped Medium Load Member

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    From a mechanical point of view. The paccars(engines) look absolutely horrible to work on. Then you look at the cost of the rebuild on some of these newer cummins. Wow just crazy in cost. I see the trucking industry going to like the ag industry. Neighbor had an iveco motor blow up. $70k for that job. I know I can't afford those type of rebuilds.
     
  10. DUNE-T

    DUNE-T Road Train Member

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    Do you own a truck?
     
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  11. GYPSY65

    GYPSY65 Heavy Load Member

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    SW FLA
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    I have owned 3 Dpf trucks
    2014
    2019
    2021
    And looking to order a new one
    I have never even seen a gelled filter or had def issues other than sensors on the ‘14 I bought with 200k

    I think a lot of issues are from some of the ignorant drivers we see now
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2021
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