UPS

(800) 742-5877

  • Overall
  • Home Time
  • Equipment and Maintenance
  • Dispatchers and Managers
Based on 5 Reviews

Salary

The Glassdoor.com average UPS driver salary is $76,955 per year.

While there are variations in available plans, the following is an overview of the company's award-winning benefits:

  • Medical
  • Dental
  • Vision
  • Prescription Drug Program
  • Life Insurance
  • Supplemental Group Universal Life Program
  • Business Travel Accident Insurance
  • Sickness & Accident Insurance
  • Long-Term Disability with Inflation coverage
  • Long-Term Care Insurance
  • Child/Eldercare Spending Accounts
  • Healthcare Spending Accounts
  • Cancer Insurance
  • Work-Life Balance Programs
  • Employee discounted stock purchase plan
  • UPS believes that long-term ownership of our company by UPSers is an important contributor to our future success. Sharing in the rewards and risks of ownership promotes the commitment of our people, full-time and part-time, management and non-management, union and union free, which is critical to our ability to enable global commerce. Employees can purchase stock through the Discounted Employee Stock Purchase Program and their 401(k) plan.
  • Competitive salaries
  • UPS offers highly competitive hourly wages, salaries, and total compensation plans. From its drivers to its IT professionals, UPS employees are among the best paid in the industry.
  • Managers Incentive Plan (profit sharing)


In the United States, tuition assistance is available to:

  • Full-time non-union employees
  • Part-time management employees
  • Part-time union employees

Reviews Review this Company

  • Overall
  • Home Time
  • Equipment and Maintenance
  • Dispatchers and Managers
Pros
Pay, benefits, retirement
Cons
Bad trucks, inexperienced management

This is a good company to build a retirement with great pay but it does come with downsides. The equipment is old for the most part and they hang on to trucks forever. 1,000,000+ mile international day cabs are the norm. Management has taken a dive over the past few year because the company just keeps taking and taking from them. Your boss is likely to be a 24 year old kid with three accidents because that's the only person they could get to do the job. That being said you will make great money and have access to great benefits with a great 401k and a pension.

Currently Employed at Company: Yes
  • Overall
  • Home Time
  • Equipment and Maintenance
  • Dispatchers and Managers
Pros
Great money once you're there for long enough. Top rate is $34/hr Great benefits once you get them. All paid for. Also, retirement after 30 years.
Cons
Bad equipment, bad money for a long time after starting, getting benefits can take a year or longer, On call 24/6.

UPS is a good company once you've been a driver for them for 4+ years. Before that, especially as a brand new hire, it's a terrifyingly bad place to work. When you start you can expect: -On call 24/6. And while this sounds bad, it doesn't come close to describing just how bad. The rule is that they have to give you 1 hour notice when they call. So, unless you live within 10 minutes of the center, you pretty much can't leave the house from 5pm Sunday - 2am Saturday. Also, as long as you've had your 10 hour break, you're available. So, say you finish work at midnight. You're available at 10am. But noone calls you at 10am. You call and ask if there's anything available for the rest of the day and get told "nothing at all until tomorrow morning". So, you've slept and expect no work until the morning so you go to sleep at 10pm. And get a call at 10:30pm to come in at midnight to cover a run that's 10 hours of drive time. Noone cares that you didn't sleep for the last 12 hours prior to the shift and will be up for another 12-14. This happens OFTEN. - 18.75/hr starting pay. Not terrible. But don't forget that when you start, you're the lowest person on the totem pole. In my location, that meant I was working 1-2 days a week on weeks where noone called off. One 8 hour day at 18.75/hr? That's ~$130 for that week. - No benefits for months. The way it works is you have to physically work for 30 days (not 30 calendar days from date of hire, 30 days you actually clocked in for) to get "seniority". You have to do these 30 days in a 90 day calendar window. Once you get "seniority" you wait 90 days (calendar days this time) to get benefits. However, if you're the last person on call, you're working 1-2 days a week for most months. AND the months of November and December are a "free period" where the 90 day calendar clock stops but so does the accrual of the 30 days needed. Essentially what happened with me was I was hired in September. By November 1st, when the "free period" started, I had 20 days worked. October was fairly busy. But not busy enough. November and December don't count and my 90 day calendar window would end at the beginning of February. I was told that freight stops completely at the beginning of January, so there was essentially no way I would get another 10 days of work by the time my 90 day window rolled over. So, I would have to start over. 30 days of work from beginning of February to beginning of May. Was told I should expect to work 1 day a week until April. So, no way. No benefits for a long, long time. Also, while you're still trying to get the 30 days to get "seniority" you are on probation. Any accident/incident/call off and they can fire you with no consequences. Also, you're the first guy that gets laid off if those happen. Once you do get the benefits, they're fantastic. But getting them is a horrible experience. - I can't speak for the whole company, but for my area, the dispatchers were just horrible. They didn't know what the basic routes that happen every day do, don't know how the building works... Overall, I came in and was expected to just know how the route I was called in to cover worked off the top of my head. Noone knew anything. - Small center = horrible equipment. We had 1 truck with less than a million miles on it. The most was a Mack with 4.6 mil. No suspension, no radio, no air ride.. Essentially, imagine if the company actively wanted to make the truck as uncomfortable as possible and you'll get it. It's a running joke among the drivers that UPS actually paid more to international to buy the worst possible suspension. More because noone else wanted it and the factory had to be reconfigured for the UPS order. And it's true. You'll feel every pebble you drive over. Also, seats... I hope you don't like armrests or high back seats. I actually met the guy who was rear ended at a red light and was in a hospital for 6 months because his seat didn't have any kind of support over his shoulders. Smashed his head on the window of the daycab. They do however maintain the trucks exceptionally well. That's why it gets that 2 star. But the equipment itself is atrocious. One of my fillings fell out on week 3 from all the constant shaking. You're expected to make and break down a set within a set period of time. If you take longer, it can be counted against you. Loads are vast majority of terminal to terminal, you (mostly) never deal with packages themselves. So, that's good. However, the also don't have any bypass for scales and you don't know how much your load weighs. It's standard practice to bring a ticket to dispatch and they'll pay it for you. Weekly miles don't matter, it's all hourly. But I averaged 8 hours a week for multiple weeks. Most I ever worked was 57 hours in one week. During the busiest time of the year (After thanksgiving through christmas), I was working 40-45 hours. I'm sure I'm forgetting ALOT, but all these things weren't told before I quit a decent job and went to them for orientation. And alot of these I found out as I was there. So, hopefully it helps someone.

Currently Employed at Company: No
  • Overall
  • Home Time
  • Equipment and Maintenance
  • Dispatchers and Managers
Pros
Pay and benefits. You are compensated well for everything you do.
Cons
Can't think of any. Best trucking job. You will have bad days just like any job though.

Home everyday. 2700+ miles a week. Great equipment. Haul doubles. Sometimes have to build my set. But usually already built and ready for me. Mileage pay and hourly for most other work performed.

Currently Employed at Company: Yes
  • Overall
  • Home Time
  • Equipment and Maintenance
  • Dispatchers and Managers
Pros
great pay
Cons
management are a pain

home daily, odd hours,2500 to 3000 miles per week. doubles driver, 100000 per year, equipment fair to good. management constantly on your back.

Currently Employed at Company: Yes
  • Overall
  • Home Time
  • Equipment and Maintenance
  • Dispatchers and Managers
Pros
Big Bucks, great benefits,
Cons
constant harassment over times, two minutes too long here, etc.

Best job I ever had worse company I ever worked for. Management by intimidation, constant harassment about schedule, times taken to complete runs.

Currently Employed at Company: No

Salary Surveys Take a Salary Survey

Pay
$120,000 per Year
Position
Company Driver
Trailer Type
Dry Van
Years of CDL Experience
5+ Years
Location
Miami, FL
Pay
$102,000 per Year
Position
Company Driver
Trailer Type
53' van
Years of CDL Experience
5+ Years
Location
West Chester PA
Currently Employed at Company: Yes
Pay
$50,000 per Year
Position
Company Driver
Trailer Type
Years of CDL Experience
In CDL School
Location
edmonton
Pay
$19 per Hour
Position
Company Driver
Trailer Type
53ft, 48ft, doubles, container
Years of CDL Experience
2 Years
Location
Charlottesville, VA
Currently Employed at Company: No
Pay
$17 per Hour
Position
Company Driver
Trailer Type
Van
Years of CDL Experience
1 Year
Location
52358

Discussion


ciscokid79
UPS

my friend just got hired at ups (brown not freight) off the street. started on call part time 24.00 hr for 4 months then got hired on busted down to 16.00hr but within a year says he will be back to 24.00 hr then top scale of 32.00 hr reached within 4 yrs this is out of davenport Ia sounds great right. but hold on he is on the call in board and will be for years so basically one week he might work all week next week 2 days and he has to be available 24/7 make no mistake ups is no gravy train but put your time in and deal with the B.S till you get some senority then its great, plus if you have kids the bennys are unbeatable

Full Discussion

iamchrisstone
UPS Team OTR

Yes we have teams, but not many. Most of our freight is moved by rail. Usually the most senior drivers bid team runs. The bid winner can then choose their teammate. Pay is about $.70 a mile. Most team guys will each make $120k to 130K a year. Runs vary, but most are out 4-4 1/2 days and off 2 1/2-3 days. I run local from a center in Northern Colorado to Denver. Make two round trips and work about 52-53 hours a week and pulled down 102K. Mileage guys do better than hourly guys like me, but I'm not complaining. Make $100k driving a truck. Not bad, but 80% of the work is at night for local guys which turns off a lot of package guys from bidding into feeders. I don't mind it, because I can sleep during the day. 

UPS is a pay your dues company. The junior guys get the worse runs and the senior guys get the best runs. The longer you work here the better it gets. A junior guy can get into a team run if the senior driver who wins the team bid picks the junior guy to run with him. Make friends with a senior guy and get him to pick you as a teammate. I've been at UPS for 25 years, so life is good because I'm the most senior Feeder driver at my small center. We only have 3 feeder runs. I can choose which run I want, which vacation days I want, and which days off I want. It is great.

It is easier to get a job off the street at UPS as a Feeder driver than a Package car driver, because Feeder bids go unfilled because of the night work. If no one bids the Feeder job than the company will hire off the street. I'm not sure why the driver hated UPS so much, because every off the street hire I've ever met says UPS is like a vacation to every other driving job they have had. Work is steady, pay is great, benefits are great, equipment is great, repairs are done, great vacation time (I have 7 weeks off a year) and union protection. Seems a little silly to give up a good job over a beard and uniform, but some people aren't cut out for UPS. Suspect there may be more to that story. UPS does have its way, and they expect you to follow their way. I've never found any rules to be odd, but I came up through UPS, so maybe I'm just use to it. Most have a purpose behind them. Like memorizing driving and yard safety rules. Lots of drivers hate that, but it is designed to keep everyone safe. Most guys who can't cut it at UPS want do things their way and find when they can't they quit or get fired. Or they want to have the life of a senior driver like me. Best runs, best pay, best time off, but can't because of their lower seniority. They don't think it's fair etc. What they don't except is that we all put in the time and took the bad runs and worked the bad hours until we got to point we are at now where life it good. Some guys just don't want to pay their dues for a better life.

Full Discussion

brown5280
UPS Team OTR

Mileage pay 2015: Single trailer $0 .7873 Double trailers: $0.8045 Triple Trailers: $0.8212 a mile. Not sure what you mean by strict. UPS has its way and you MUST do it their way. Yes you do have to wear a uniform, no beards, clean shaven, etc. No its not that strict. Feeders is way better than packages for a accidents. I've seen a guy punch a hole in a trailer backing a dolly under it and only get a slap on the hand. Also, know a guy who rolled a set of triples and get his job back. Was suspended for 6 weeks, but they brought him back. Usually supervisor will ride with you for a day and go over safety stuff all day if its not too bad. Gets more harsh if you roll a trailer and its your fault. 

All feeder jobs are posted at upsjobs.com. Most teams come from inside from other feeder drivers bidding those runs. They pay really well, so the guys with the team runs are usually very senior. Union rules apply so the person with the most seniority gets the run when its bid. Once he has the run he can then pick his teammate. Best advice I can give is to apply for any feeder jobs and get your foot in the door. Once you are hired then you can start bidding runs. Runs are bid yearly. Word of caution. Make sure you know what you are applying for; permanent or season feeder job. Seasonal will only last a few months around Christmas or during the summer and then you are laid off. Might hire you if they have an opening, but its rolling the dice.

Full Discussion

morgothaod
Anyone work for UPS?

Bucky, glad you sit some of these people straight. I find some of the comments about UPS right down ignorant. Yes, both UPS and UPS Freight are union with the exception of a couple of terminals in the freight division(bunch of "parasites") The truckload division is not union. Both UPS and UPS Freight are "prime" jobs, excellent pay and benefits. 

Full Discussion

Shaggy
Anyone work for UPS?

Just fill out the application, go on the interview and see what the TM has to say. I work as a feeder driver for UPS and if I wasn't working for that side of the company I would be working at UPSF. They are a solid outfit with good drivers and some of the new Volvo tractors are awesome. Both areas take real good care of the equipment so you don't get screwed with by DOT.

Full Discussion

Gazoo64
Ups freight

Some feeder drivers on the package division make well over 6 figures. But i bet the old timers that run linehaul can scratch similar numbers with high mileage bids. With 72cpm they better be. The highest paying run in my yard will make you 97k/year and we are stuck at 58cpm.

Full Discussion

PALOU
Ups freight

Feeder drivers are UPS package drivers that run between terminals. Same as a linehaul driver.

Full Discussion

Midwesttrucker
UPS Feeder Driver

Q: Just got hired as a FULL TIME feeder driver (tractor-trailer) at UPS Parcel and am very excited but nervous as well. When I met with HR she said that the overtime would be pretty much limited for a while. I've been in trucking not too long but long enough to know that a eight and skate is a rarity on most days. If any feeder drivers could chime in that would be great. This is a premium job and have worked hard to keep my nose and license clean so an opportunity at UPS would not be out of reach. Also just to clarity I'm not a current employee transferring into feeders but an off the street hire so my seniority is zero.

Right now I work in a unionized LTL with plenty of overtime opportunities and make a decent weekly take home with the OT. Once I get started I plan on posting how things are going for a new UPS'er.

 

A:  You have THE best driving job in the country. But you better realize that you are the lowest driver in seniority in that building, you will live by the phone, take what other drivers have turned down, work under a bunch of rules and you might face being laid off at times. Keep your nose clean and hang in there. This will be a 5 day work week job and home everyday. You will be paid for everything you do, some buildings pay by the hour, others by the miles, plus hour pay for extra work. Great benefits, good job security. 

Consider yourself very fortunate by getting this job. If I was a young man and wanting to drive for a living, I would sit on their doorsteps every morning until they hired me.

Full Discussion

Shaggy
UPS Feeder Driver

Becoming a feeder driver is the highest paying trucking job at UPS. Feeder Driver positions are posted as tractor trailer drivers. Those are the jobs you want to apply for and get. Feeder drivers are only on the parcel side of the business and top out at $33.00 per hour (takes four years to get) with OT after eight. A lot of times those tractor trailer driver jobs are posted as a seasonal job. Make sure you apply for it. If you get an interview tell the HR rep you want full time. You never know so MAKE SURE YOU ASK!!!. When you apply for the job apply to the larger hubs. Those small hubs have a waiting list a mile long with guys who have been with ups for almost a lifetime. Just give it a shot and apply. This is an old school company so when you go there to interview dress nice, polish you shoes and comb your hair. Don't go in there looking like you just rolled out of the TA. Take out your earrings and cover every tattoo that's visible.

Full Discussion

Rubber Neck
UPS Feeder Driver

Yes, my buddy works min hours. Doesn't try to work over 45hrs. Still makes 80k. Only draw back about it even though a lot of it is light lifting the body gives way. He's been off of work for 8-9 months cause of his back he's only 37. Feeder is all about the money cause you won't get a normal day shift til 15yrs or more in. He can probably bump into a day shift if he bids one. The money in feeder is insane. One of the runs out here is 600 miles round trip home daily 5 days a week over there it pays 120k base one of the drivers told me. That's not what senior make either on the same run too.

Full Discussion

Shaggy
UPS Feeder Driver

UPS Feeder....aahhh, the Holy Grail of trucking. I've worked a few peak seasons there, it's definitely crazy and they will "rule and regualte" you to death. However, it's the easiest trucking job you'll ever have. 

The pay is insane IF you're a full timer. Too big of a gap between part time and the full time guys, in my opinion. The last peak I worked I got a call to drive my personal vehicle to another domicile approximately 100 miles away. I then ran a mileage run in their truck, returning to the original departing facility (turn). They reimbursed me mileage for driving my own vehicle to the other depot and guess what? I got paid MORE per mile for driving my pickup than I did pulling a set of doubles from PA to NJ! Of course, that's not the case if you're full time. 

That being said, UPS FULL TIME Feeder would be about the ONLY place I'd go if I were looking for another 
driving job.A

Full Discussion