Trucking Jobs New Driver Jobs Flatbed Jobs Tanker Jobs Refrigerated Jobs Auto Hauler Jobs
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1
    Medium Load Member me only's Avatar
    Member Since
    Nov 2011
    Location
    buford ga
    Trucker?
    20 Years
    Age
    54
    Posts
    309
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked: 85 Times

    Maximum legal weight for 40ft 48'' spread axle?

    My truck weighs 7700lbs ,Trailer weighs 7000lbs .What's the most weight you put on your 40ft 48'' spread axle and stay legal?.I haul light stuff now around here .

  2. #2
    Road Train Member
    Member Since
    May 2011
    Trucker?
    11 Years
    Posts
    2,137
    Thanks
    117
    Thanked: 1,830 Times
    What is the distance between the front drive axle and the rear trailer axle? With my truck and a 39' frameless end dump, that measurement is right at 36'....so if you're pulling a 40' trailer, I would GUESS you'd have 4 axles in roughly 37'...which lets you carry 66,500 on those 4 axles...although there is an exception in the bridge formula which allows two consecutive sets of tandem axles to carry 34,000 pounds each if the overall distance between the first and last axles of the tandems is 36 feet or more.

    I'm not entirely sure a spread axle would be considered a "tandem" as it is generally viewed as being two single axles, so it MAY not fall under this exception....in which case, you'd be better off with a tandem axle trailer instead of a spread...because then it WOULD fall into the exception which allows 68,000 on the drives + trailer instead of only 66,500 on those same 4 axles.

    That covers the "trailer bridge". Now you need to look at the "tractor bridge". What is the distance between the center of the steer axle to the center of the rear drive axle? If the axle, suspension, and tires are all rated heavy enough, you could possibly run 13,500 on your steers to make up for the 1500 pounds you lose on the trailer bridge.

    Then measure from the center of the steer axle to the center of the rear trailer axle to get your overall bridge. As long as that distance is at least 51', you can go to 80,000 provided the tractor (steer + drives) and trailer (drives + trailer) axle groups are all within their allowed weights.

    13.5/34/32.5 would be legal if you have at least 16 feet on the tractor bridge and 51' between the center of the steer axle and the center of the rear trailer axle.

    13.5/32.5/34 would be legal if you have at least 14 feet on the tractor bridge and 51' on the overall (5-axle) bridge.

    Or, if you want to have a balanced load between drives & trailer axles, 13.5/33.25/33.25 would work too...and then you only need 15' on the tractor bridge and 51' overall.

    Of course if you're running on a 12K steer axle with LP22.5 LRG tires, you can't legally carry 13.5K on your steers.

    Basically, get out a tape measure and consult the bridge formula & manufacturer's ratings for your truck.

    http://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/publ...ormula_all.pdf


    So now to answer your question: What's the most weight you put on your 40ft 48'' spread axle and stay legal?

    1) Measure your truck to determine axle spacing.

    2) Consult the bridge formula to determine maximum allowable weights for the axle groups.

    3) Check your manufacturer's rating for the axles. If lower than the bridge formula would otherwise allow, the manufacturer's ratings are your limit.

    4) Subtract your tare weight from the limits imposed by the bridge law and your manufacturer's ratings. That is what you can legally load on your trailer IF it is loaded in a manner which distributes the weight to keep your axle groups within the bridge formula and the manufacturer's ratings.

  3. #3
    Crusty Commando-Pete 07-379Pete's Avatar
    Member Since
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Campbellsville, Ky
    Trucker?
    29 Years
    Age
    51
    Posts
    2,559
    Thanks
    1,822
    Thanked: 2,322 Times
    Quote Originally Posted by me only View Post
    My truck weighs 7700lbs ,Trailer weighs 7000lbs .What's the most weight you put on your 40ft 48'' spread axle and stay legal?.I haul light stuff now around here .
    A 7700 pound truck?? WTF My motor weights that much alone.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to 07-379Pete For This Useful Post:


  5. #4
    Medium Load Member me only's Avatar
    Member Since
    Nov 2011
    Location
    buford ga
    Trucker?
    20 Years
    Age
    54
    Posts
    309
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked: 85 Times
    Quote Originally Posted by 07-379Pete View Post
    A 7700 pound truck?? WTF My motor weights that much alone.
    i hope so when i drove semi myself ,it was also heavier

    im retired and want to do something .so im lightweight hotshot .have plenty of freight with out busting my fanny and home every night.do as i want with no comitiment to anyone .
    im not doing this to make a living .its almost a hobby to me and good tax rite offs .i love to drive .
    Last edited by me only; 12.01.2011 at 05.25 PM.

  6. #5
    Road Train Member SHO-TYME's Avatar
    Member Since
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Dahlonega, GA
    Trucker?
    25 Years
    Posts
    2,264
    Thanks
    674
    Thanked: 1,672 Times
    What are the axels on the trailer rated at? That's what you have to worry about, you can't go by the same formula as a semi.

  7. #6
    Medium Load Member me only's Avatar
    Member Since
    Nov 2011
    Location
    buford ga
    Trucker?
    20 Years
    Age
    54
    Posts
    309
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked: 85 Times
    Quote Originally Posted by SHO-TYME View Post
    What are the axels on the trailer rated at? That's what you have to worry about, you can't go by the same formula as a semi.
    13000lb each dexter axels


  8. #7
    Road Train Member
    Member Since
    May 2011
    Trucker?
    11 Years
    Posts
    2,137
    Thanks
    117
    Thanked: 1,830 Times
    Quote Originally Posted by me only View Post
    13000lb each dexter axels


    That's not a spread axle. That's a tandem. If they are rated at 13,000 each, that's 26,000.

    Your steer axle has a maximum weight rating.

    Your drive axle has a maximum weight rating.

    Your trailer axles have a maximum weight rating. (26,000#)

    Your truck has a maximum tow capacity rating.

    The hitch has a maximum trailer weight rating. (typically 25,000 for a gooseneck, although I've seen them rated higher)

    Your truck and trailer are registered for a specified weight.





    You can legally haul as much as you can carry up to those limits.

  9. #8
    Trucker Forum STAFF CondoCruiser's Avatar
    Member Since
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
    Trucker?
    EX-15 Years
    Age
    52
    Posts
    17,645
    Thanks
    6,751
    Thanked: 15,886 Times
    Is it a Big Tex 40' gooseneck??

    If so, it's rated at 22,500.

    If you max out, load it so the weight is distributed between your drives and tandems.

  10. #9
    Medium Load Member me only's Avatar
    Member Since
    Nov 2011
    Location
    buford ga
    Trucker?
    20 Years
    Age
    54
    Posts
    309
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked: 85 Times
    Quote Originally Posted by Pedigreed Bulldog View Post
    That's not a spread axle. That's a tandem. If they are rated at 13,000 each, that's 26,000.

    Your steer axle has a maximum weight rating.

    Your drive axle has a maximum weight rating.

    Your trailer axles have a maximum weight rating. (26,000#)

    Your truck has a maximum tow capacity rating.

    The hitch has a maximum trailer weight rating. (typically 25,000 for a gooseneck, although I've seen them rated higher)

    Your truck and trailer are registered for a specified weight.





    You can legally haul as much as you can carry up to those limits.

    big tek 22gn 48'' spread axle 35+5 =40ft is how they list it

  11. #10
    Light Load Member
    Member Since
    Nov 2010
    Location
    The Great State of Texas
    Trucker?
    50 Years
    Posts
    285
    Thanks
    401
    Thanked: 58 Times
    What weight are you apportioned for ???

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast