ABS out of service ?

Discussion in 'Trucking Industry Regulations' started by wildbill123, Jan 18, 2011.

  1. TrailerTruckin

    TrailerTruckin Light Load Member

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    Was told by a friend the other day that its (8) eight (not sure why it put the smiley in there) points on your CSA if the ABS light is on, considered safety violation top tier of the points system.
     
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  3. Hardlyevr

    Hardlyevr Road Train Member

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    That hasn't been my experience, often times simple things can solve the problem. Get under the trailer and look at each connection on the ABS system and make sure they are snug, check for rubbed wires. If you can see them, press the sensors in towards the splines, often times they have wiggled too far out to get a reading. You can also put the pigtail in and out a few times quickly, and then back in, and some ABS systems will give you a flashing fault code to tell what to look for. But the code will be dependent on the brand of system.

    Here's the one for Meritor:
    http://www.meritorwabco.com/MeritorWABCO_document/tp0173.pdf

    Google whatever brand you have for ABS trailer fault blink codes.
     
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  4. SuperLiner

    SuperLiner Light Load Member

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    Good question Indeed !! I had wondered about this also. One of our only two Flatbeds has ABS the other does not. All our Power Units are equipped with ABS. Result?? A CONSTANT ABS fault on the info. center on the dash when pulling the non ABS equipped flatbed. Should I write that up on a pre-trip? Does it matter?
     
  5. dieselbear

    dieselbear Road Train Member

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    Just a violation, not out of service.

    §393.55 Antilock brake systems.
    (a) Hydraulic brake systems. Each truck and bus manufactured on or after March 1, 1999 (except trucks and buses engaged in driveaway-towaway operations), and equipped with a hydraulic brake system, shall be equipped with an antilock brake system that meets the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 105 (49 CFR 571.105, S5.5).
    (b) ABS malfunction indicators for hydraulic braked vehicles. Each hydraulic braked vehicle subject to the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section shall be equipped with an ABS malfunction indicator system that meets the requirements of FMVSS No. 105 (49 CFR 571.105, S5.3).
    (c) Air brake systems. (1) Each truck tractor manufactured on or after March 1, 1997 (except truck tractors engaged in drive-away-towaway operations), shall be equipped with an antilock brake system that meets the requirements of FMVSS No. 121 (49 CFR 571.121, S5.1.6.1(b)).
    (c)(2) Each air braked commercial motor vehicle other than a truck tractor, manufactured on or after March 1, 1998 (except commercial motor vehicles engaged in driveaway-towaway operations), shall be equipped with an antilock brake system that meets the requirements of FMVSS No. 121 (49 CFR 571.121, S5.1.6.1(a) for trucks and buses, S5.2.3 for semitrailers, converter dollies and full trailers).

    (d) ABS malfunction circuits and signals for air braked vehicles.
    (d)(1) Each truck tractor manufactured on or after March 1, 1997, and each single-unit air braked vehicle manufactured on or after March 1, 1998, subject to the requirements of paragraph (c) of this section, shall be equipped with an electrical circuit that is capable of signaling a malfunction that affects the generation or transmission of response or control signals to the vehicle’s antilock brake system (49 CFR 571.121, S5.1.6.2(a)).
    (d)(2) Each truck tractor manufactured on or after March 1, 2001, and each single-unit vehicle that is equipped to tow another air-braked vehicle, subject to the requirements of paragraph (c) of this section, shall be equipped with an electrical circuit that is capable of transmitting a malfunction signal from the antilock brake system(s) on the towed vehicle(s) to the trailer ABS malfunction lamp in the cab of the towing vehicle, and shall have the means for connection of the electrical circuit to the towed vehicle. The ABS malfunction circuit and signal shall meet the requirements of FMVSS No. 121 (49 CFR 571.121, S5.1.6.2(b)).
    (d)(3) Each semitrailer, trailer converter dolly, and full trailer manufactured on or after March 1, 2001, and subject to the requirements of paragraph (c)(2) of this section, shall be equipped with an electrical circuit that is capable of signaling a malfunction in the trailer’s antilock brake system, and shall have the means for connection of this ABS malfunction circuit to the towing vehicle. In addition, each trailer manufactured on or after March 1, 2001, subject to the requirements of paragraph (c)(2) of this section, that is designed to tow another air-brake equipped trailer shall be capable of transmitting a malfunction signal from the antilock brake system(s) of the trailer(s) it tows to the vehicle in front of the trailer. The ABS malfunction circuit and signal shall meet the requirements of FMVSS No. 121 (49 CFR 571.121, S5.2.3.2).

    (e) Exterior ABS malfunction indicator lamps for trailers. Each trailer (including a trailer converter dolly) manufactured on or after March 1, 1998 and before March 1, 2009, and subject to the requirements of paragraph (c)(2) of this section, shall be equipped with an ABS malfunction indicator lamp which meets the requirements of FMVSS No. 121 (49 CFR 571.121, S5.2.3.3).
     
  6. Zuma

    Zuma Light Load Member

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    NM, already there in dieselbear's post.
     
  7. SuperLiner

    SuperLiner Light Load Member

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    Based on what I'm reading here .. I can? conclude that I would not have to note the presense of an ABS fault on my pre-trip?? If the trailer being pulled was / is not so equipped?
     
  8. CondoCruiser

    CondoCruiser The Legend

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    A common problem is the wheel sensor or the vanes it counts gets dirt on them. All you have to do is clean them off. That'll solve the majority of ABS lights.
     
  9. Hardlyevr

    Hardlyevr Road Train Member

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    Right, it is NOT a defect or problem if it was never equipped. To my knowledge there was never a mandatory retrofit rule, like there is for CARB stuff.
     
  10. ChromeDome

    ChromeDome Road Train Member

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    One easy thing to check if it is on and will not go off with a particular trailer.
    Look for a cable/ wire going into a brake drum. You will have it there somewhere lol.
    Within a few inches of where it comes out of the brake you will normally find a connection.
    This comes loose allot, especially this time of year with ice and snow. If it is unplugged then plug it back in, and if you can get a large zip tie around that axle to hold it closer so it will not happen again.
    I find this on 50% or more of the trailers that have an ABS light on that will not go off in a few miles.
     
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