Advantages of a spread axle trailer?

Discussion in 'Questions To Truckers From The General Public' started by Bobg, Feb 12, 2009.

  1. ironpony

    ironpony Road Train Member

    17,502
    12,011
    Sep 23, 2007
    Ask my GPS...
    0
    Well, yeah! That's the way that works...

    Which is why you slide the tandems all the way back so the back end of the stupid thing tracks with the tires. DUH!

    :biggrin_25525:
     
  2. Truckers Report Jobs

    Trucking Jobs in 30 seconds

    Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport.

  3. Passin Thru

    Passin Thru Road Train Member

    1,918
    560
    Mar 8, 2007
    VA
    0
  4. Winchester Magnum

    Winchester Magnum Road Train Member

    1,492
    1,647
    Jan 4, 2009
    Alaska highway
    0
    Since I was the one who wrote I can take on 45,000 and be legal, you must be talking to me.

    I don't know why I should explain this, but here goes - My tractor and trailer, emtpy, weighs 35,000 pounds.

    No clue where you got the implication that anyone here said it's okay to go over 80,000 with a spread either.
     
  5. DD14

    DD14 Light Load Member

    177
    30
    Jan 21, 2009
    Ontario
    0
    I wrote that in response to your first sentence.I understand that if you weigh 35,000lbs. empty that 45,000 works. I guess maybe I misunderstood what you were saying because you put "you" in that sentence instead of "I" and because of that some people may also misunderstand what you were saying.For what it is worth to anyone in my past experience I do know that if for example I was loaded 11,500-30,500-40,000 which is 82,000lbs. gross and crossed a scale like in Ohio that only has axle scales that you usually just roll across, I would likely not get caught.As in my comment about Florida that uses a prewiegh axle scale on the exit ramp that is usually set at 60/65,000lbs. and if you are heavier than that it redirects you to the platfrom scale that your whole unit fits on,well I guess we know what the result of that will be.2000lbs.x0.05=$100.00.I was not trying to offend you.
     
  6. Winchester Magnum

    Winchester Magnum Road Train Member

    1,492
    1,647
    Jan 4, 2009
    Alaska highway
    0
    No worries. I go in and outta 1st/2nd 3rd person. That #### Win Mag guy....(grin)

    With your 11,500-30,500-40,000 = 82,0000 example in Ohio, all you need is dump vavles LOL

    Your stuff on Florida is pretty close too. I've tried to figgure out the upper end weight wise before they bring you onto the platform - I've been pulled in at 71,000 and have also gotten the green at about that same weight. I think it has to do with how hard you hit it if there's any bump close. Getting a little under 45 mph helps....I think anyway. One scale to the next makes a slight diff as well.
     
  7. DD14

    DD14 Light Load Member

    177
    30
    Jan 21, 2009
    Ontario
    0
    My theory on those speed rated axle scales is if they are set to a particular speed a little slower should weigh slightly higher and a little faster should show lighter.I had a 53' with an 11' spread and it seemed the scale in Knoxville,Tenn. would not catch it even when I was getting close to 82,000lbs.In Fla. I would see drivers going down the exit ramp into the scales at 25mph. when the signs clearly say to MAINTAIN 45 and then they would hit thier brakes when they would see that axle plate and well usually they would get the arrow to weigh.It must scare them.If only we could get them to drive that slowly in the truckstop parking lots.
     
    KB3MMX Thanks this.
  8. Les2

    Les2 Road Train Member

    5,150
    2,286
    Jul 25, 2008
    kicked back in my lazyboy...
    0
    I think MI kicks the weight back to 18k per axle.

    Now you guys with those canadian spreads are only allowed 38k in the US, I think?
     
    KB3MMX Thanks this.
  9. Daisydog

    Daisydog Bobtail Member

    2
    0
    Mar 19, 2009
    Nebr
    0
    I have a spread axle question. I'm not really a trucker, just a rancher with a truck hauling hay on a flatbed aluminum, with less than 2000 miles under my belt. We have a scale close by and have been really watching the axle weights. A typical load will be: tractor: 11,500-33,000 trailer spread: 11,500-23,500.
    Called several dealers, everyone seems to think it's impossible. Only one with an opinion said my tractor height is too high. I have 22.5's on tractor and 24.5's on the trailer. There is no valve that I can see that equalizes air pressure (air suspension) from front to rear.
    Have been thinking putting 22.5's (smaller tire) on the back axle might force more weight to the front axle.
    Any comments welcome. Thanks.
     
  10. Coonass

    Coonass "Freshy Fresh"

    1,080
    1,179
    Sep 23, 2008
    0
    So what exactly is your question.
     
    KB3MMX Thanks this.
  11. pullingtrucker

    pullingtrucker Road Train Member

    1,185
    593
    Dec 21, 2008
    Fostoria, Ohio
    0
    If I'm reading this right your saying that there is a 12,000 lb. difference from the lead axle to the rear axle of the trailer. :biggrin_2551:If this is actually happening then there is something wrong with the trailer. It could be in the suspension or it could be a cracked frame (I've seen it happen). This is NOT normal. Ussually there is at the most a 500-1000 difference and I normally saw a 300 lb. difference in my spread.
     
    KB3MMX Thanks this.
  • Truckers Report Jobs

    Trucking Jobs in 30 seconds

    Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport.

  • Draft saved Draft deleted