Back pay for working off the clock?

Discussion in 'Wal-Mart' started by Voyager55, Jan 24, 2018.

  1. Voyager55

    Voyager55 Light Load Member

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    It has occurred to me, and I would love to hear from other longevity drivers, just how much the company did NOT pay me for time on the job! For instance, when I first went to work for them, I was an extra driver, sometimes switching tractors 2 to 4 times a week, depending on who was dispatching and if she like you or not. We were required to wait in line, and then wash and vacume out the tractor, and fuel it. We spent hours a week sometimes doing this, never paid! We were required to sit in the break room sometimes for hours, waiting between trips, usually not realised to go home or paid for this. When we arrived at a store or vender, we were required to give them free time, before we went on the clock. Looking back, over a 20+ year history, I fell they probably owe me AT LEAST one thousand dollars a year, to the tune of $20,00 back pay. In my mine, I showed up for work, I did what they required and they did not compensate me or others, that I saw. If a smart team of lawyers ever files a class action lawsuit, I will be signing up, and WM will end up back paying us drivers MILLIONS$$$.
     
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  2. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

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    There is one little concept that is part of the Federal regulation of Trucking as a industry.

    Over time hours are EXEMPT from being paid. Working 70 to 110 to 130 hours a week dealing with something around the truck is all unpaid other than mileage. If it aint turning, you aint earning.

    Until that is changed and everyone has to pay time and half equivilant between 40 hours to 70 hours each week this situation will continue.

    Inflation did not help either. What was 500 dollars on a good week in the 80's made for 1500 dollars today. At that rate you will need to make 3000 or better each week to stay ahead and actually prosper.

    In fact, if you have a good set of balls and have some courage, why not become a trucking company yourself. That way you are no longer wasting away as a chronically underpaid abused company driver.
     
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  3. Voyager55

    Voyager55 Light Load Member

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    Thank you for your kind explanation, but, I dissagree that the required information I gave would be considered overtime, but who knows, I am no attorney. I just never felt it was fair. An honest days pay for honest days work, kind of my motto.
     
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  4. 48Packard

    48Packard Ol' Two-stop Shag!

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    I actually sent a "bill" to the head of van truckload at Schneider a few years ago after a particularly bad stretch of having to spent a lot of uncompensated time doing and waiting for trailer repairs, ranging from caulking holes to fixing lights to getting tires replaced that had obviously been through numerous drivers before getting to me. Based on my calculations and a discounted shop rate of just $50 per hour, I emailed a bill for $400 and asked when I could expect payment. Naturally I never received a dime, let alone a reply.

    But after that, I spent a lot less time doing freebies for Schneider. OOS stuff, sure. But piddly crap? I passed it right on.
     
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  5. Voyager55

    Voyager55 Light Load Member

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    I feel your pain brother!
     
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  6. 48Packard

    48Packard Ol' Two-stop Shag!

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    I should have mentioned I didn't ALWAYS leave piddly stuff. But things like upper clearance lights and other stuff that wasn't readily accessible by a driver but not OOS stuff I would tend to leave if it would require making an extra stop. You just reach a point....
     
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  7. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

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    I used to cheerfully do the lights and such. It's my money.

    I should have kept my money and let the company stew in the pot. No one has ever thanked me for the small stuff done. As if they cared at all. I finally stopped doing the "Piddly Train" it's a hole in that pocket I think around 1996.

    Now what I do sometimes if I catch a driver leaving a load or trailer that is hurt really bad and in need of TLC, I'll turn it into the shop and not even put it on my 5th wheel. Why? Because if I touched it, turned it over to another, I will get the blame and potentailly billed for all the damage I did not do. Don't think they wont. The art of the back stabbing financially is alive and well. Hurts my feelings. Not anymore it doesnt. Pay up Boss.
     
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  8. 06driver

    06driver Road Train Member

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    You were not paid by the hour so your argument is moot.
     
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  9. x1Heavy

    x1Heavy Road Train Member

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    I am a little bit slow on the switch sometimes and I'll explain myself here.

    The poster complained about routine things around a big truck. First off before anyone gets onery I have to say that the complainer does not like trucking at all. They are houses of pain to him.

    With that said, when I see a big truck, particularly mine... I see a woman. She needs fuel, fluids, feeding, oiling, tending to. Cleaning the windows, lights, greasing the pins and son etc etc etc etc. Sometimes she comes out of a construction zone as as dirty girl and off to the wash she goes. All nice and pretty. Maybe do a little toolbox fixing things that break or wrestling with a yarn ball of wiring that turned to hash on you at the fire wall.

    To me a truck will be able to run into Hell itself if everything is top notch and I have the courage and paid well enough to do it. Sometimes it's not about the money. Sometimes when a condescending dispatcher pats me on the head and says, here is a load. You will never get this there on time so.. See you.

    Yea right boss I'll see you in hell first. And end up being a half day early to the appt time he thinks I could not make. But that truck will need some TLC after a run like that. And I have no problem doing that. If I can take care of wife it will take care of me.

    Rereading carefully the OP's asserting of problems in trucking, it is clear to me he does not have what it takes to develop a love of the trucks, trailer, the culture and dedication necessary to engage in useful behaviors that specifically support two goals. First... a clean truck, #### and span (Not inspecited by DOT...) and medically good to live in. The second would be to support being able to be told OUT NOW by a dispatcher handing you a load to hell.

    I hate to imagine what this person must be with his sub basement cubicle office and his precious stanley stapler to use a old movie reference as a concept.
     
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  10. mpd240

    mpd240 Heavy Load Member

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    I'm a company driver. I'm no different than anybody that works for my company. When they walk in the door they punch a time clock. When they leave they punch the time clock. They are paId for all their time. Company would not allow them to work for free due to work Comp issues. No different for me. I don't work for free. Nobody in the office or management does. I shouldn't be expected too.

    This has nothing to do with liking my job. I love driving truck. I gladly work on my truck and trailer when needed. I don't expect to get paid for work I don't do. If I lied to the payroll department and get paid more than I should the company would consider it theft. What's good for the goose.
     
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