Brokers how much do you help new carriers

Discussion in 'Freight Broker Forum' started by indspirit, Jan 28, 2015.

  1. indspirit

    indspirit Light Load Member

    147
    131
    Aug 17, 2013
    0
    Just wondering from brokers how much you help out new carriers when you first started out. Had a load of feed from a regular customer but my regular carriers were not available to take load. So gave it to a new carrier who has done a few loads for me and has so far has been ontime and had great communication.

    The problem with the feed loads is they max you out. Average load is 7800 to 7900 lbs. So he picked up the load I called thinking he was on the way yet he was still there. Spent 45 minutes on the phone with carrier to show him how to move tandems to make load legal. I can do that now because I'm new but when I have 500 other trucks to work with were is the cutoff point. All my regular carriers have my cell number because tgey were guys I drove with. Gave this guy my cell to make sure load will be there. When do you set your point to sleep. My brokers when I was driving knew when to call me guess I will have to do the same thing here.
     
  2. Truckers Report Jobs

    Trucking Jobs in 30 seconds

    Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport.

  3. marineman227

    marineman227 Dock Waterer

    600
    796
    Jan 26, 2008
    Neenah, WI
    0
    Guys with their own authority need a 45 minute explanation from a broker to learn how to slide tandems? No wonder our pay rates are dropping.
     
  4. brsims

    brsims Road Train Member

    5,294
    6,500
    Aug 8, 2009
    Meadville, PA
    0
    Truckers need to know how to safely operate their equipment. If they don't they need to go back to training. I don't have time to walk a driver through an operation he should already know how to do.

    I WILL help my company drivers when they need it. But they are generally newer to flatbed, and may not know the tricks of the trade I've picked up, and my carrier does train experienced drivers who are new to flatbed. My O/O's should not need my help (unless its a one driver helping another to secure/tarp/whatnot). I can't always stop my day day to teach an O/O how to secure a coil, for example. But if I'm loading at the same mill, I will help throw chains and drag tarps.
     
    mp4694330 Thanks this.
  5. indspirit

    indspirit Light Load Member

    147
    131
    Aug 17, 2013
    0
    I thought the same thing. He doesn't seem like a bad guy but he doesn't seem to understand everything.
     
  6. indspirit

    indspirit Light Load Member

    147
    131
    Aug 17, 2013
    0
    That's what I was wondering I don't mind helping him out now because I have the time. Another good point is I don't do flat bed right know because I don't know the tricks of the trade. 3 coils with chains 4 tarps required I realize it's extra work but have no idea how much and what to charge for it.
     
  7. brsims

    brsims Road Train Member

    5,294
    6,500
    Aug 8, 2009
    Meadville, PA
    0
    We charge by the hundred weight. Ask your drivers what a fair rate per hundred would be for them, and shoot for the average. Obviously you need to ask a bunch of drivers to get a good range of rates.

    Also, some steel companies run on published rates (like US Steel). Get those rates, trim a FAIR percentage off, and offer the loads to your drivers. IF you aren't charging a FAIR percentage, your drivers WILL know and they will leave you high and dry.

    You will never make a killing on steel freight as a broker (or as a O/O, in my opinion), but it can add up if you have steady equipment to haul it. The guys I broker out of USX use the steel freight to move the trucks out to better loads that bring them back.
     
  8. astanbrough

    astanbrough Light Load Member

    51
    29
    Sep 19, 2014
    0
    If the driver is hard working and truly wants your help so they can provide better service then you should absolutely help him out. If you treat drivers the same way you would treat yourself in that situation, then they will likely be willing to work much harder for you than if you just tell them to figure it out on their own. However if they're just an idiot than you should probably never put them on a load again.
     
  9. double yellow

    double yellow Road Train Member

    5,946
    10,052
    Aug 28, 2011
    State of Jefferson
    0
    I wouldn't expect a broker to help teach a carrier how to be legal. I would expect a broker and/or shipper to tell the carrier of any unusual conditions unique to their product (e.g. loads with restricted routing not for legal reasons, but to stay below a certain elevation).
     
  10. indspirit

    indspirit Light Load Member

    147
    131
    Aug 17, 2013
    0
    Yeah that makes sense he called this morning and reported in so I didn't have to call him so that's a plus. The problem was that the load was heavy and he had to slide the 5th wheel to make it work. Add to that the pick up was in an area where the closest cat scale is 100 miles away so they send him to a local scale and you have to calculate your own weight. He was frustrated and getting confused so his calculations weren't always right. He thanked me this morning for my help. If all goes well tonight and paperwork sent in timely I'll give him a few more loads and see how it goes.
     
  11. indspirit

    indspirit Light Load Member

    147
    131
    Aug 17, 2013
    0
    I think more brokers should be more knowledgeable about the industry. They should have more of an understanding of what information a carrier needs to do his job. Since I was a driver I understand what it's like. However, I drove a reefer so I don't do many skateboard loads right now because I don't know what the carrier needs. I'm reading and learning from the 2 skateboard carriers I have now so when I get a better understanding will move more loads.
     
  • Truckers Report Jobs

    Trucking Jobs in 30 seconds

    Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport.

  • Draft saved Draft deleted