Changing Shocks?

Discussion in 'Freightliner Forum' started by mgrantes, Nov 27, 2014.

  1. mgrantes

    mgrantes Light Load Member

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    2006 Freightliner Columbia. Is there anything special that I need to know about changing all the shocks on this truck? I spoke to a mechanic at TA who said that the spacing on the lower part of where the shock bolts in is important. However, for the Life of me I can't figure out why that is. Every video I've watched doesn't mention anything like that, only that all I have to do is unbolt the old and bolt in the new. Simple.
     
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  3. zinita17601

    zinita17601 Road Train Member

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    its a simple job just remove and replace,use air tools to make the job easier,those bolts can be very stuborn.
     
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  4. Jetsr6

    Jetsr6 Light Load Member

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    Anti-seize the new bolts. So next time there easier to replace. I do mine twice a year.
     
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  5. barroll

    barroll Road Train Member

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    Just put a wrench on them and get it done. TA shop techs that have no idea what they're talking about are a dime a dozen.
     
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  6. rollin coal

    rollin coal Road Train Member

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    T/A techs talk such ridiculous non-sense can't believe anyone takes them serious. Point to a perfectly good tire and ask them why is that wearing funny to get 5 minutes of nonsense answers. They'd be inframing motors at a real shop if they had any real sense about them. Not changing oil, lights, or tires. Takes about 2 minutes to change a shock out with an impact. 5 minutes without one. Nothing to it and no sense paying some T/A a half hour minimum labor plus their inflated prices for shocks for something you can very well do yourself with little more than an adjustable open end wrench. I would recommend also replacing the self locking nuts with brand new while you're at it.
     
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  7. 062

    062 Road Train Member

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    Large breaker bar and a cheater may be needed,if you don't have impact. As jetsr6 said anti-seize,had to cut bottom bolt on one of mine last year. Was seized inside bushing.
     
    mgrantes Thanks this.
  8. mgrantes

    mgrantes Light Load Member

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    Apr 26, 2013
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    Thanks for all the responses. You guys have given me the confidence I need. What TA said sounded good but I couldn't verify the advice given, which made it somewhat suspect. Replacing the self locking nuts is a good idea as well as some antiseize.
     
  9. xsetra

    xsetra Road Train Member

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    the shocks I removed from my truck, the sleeve on the bottom where bushing is, was offset. The new one, shaft was centered on bushing sleeve. Not sure why and don't think it affects shocks performance.
     
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  10. mgrantes

    mgrantes Light Load Member

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    Update: In terms of importance I decided to change my front shocks first. It took me 5 hours just to do ONE shock. My 700 ft/lbs impact was pretty much useless. There also wasn't a whole lot of room to work with making a cheater bar impracticable, meaning I couldn't get the leverage I needed. I ended up using a torque multiplier (designed for lug nut use) as a last resort to break the rust bond. I don't think I'll be able to use it on my rears though since the multiplier needs a solid object it help hold it in place as it turns. The bolt itself was seized in the bushing pretty good. I don't know how I'm going to change the passenger side front shock yet seeing as how there's a bunch of wires, piping, and essential components in the way of the top bolt. I can get the bolt to spin but the nut also spins with it. If I use a wrench to help keep it stationary then I risk punching a hole in my turbo as it'd be pressing up against that. I'm seriously considering just taking it to a garage and letting them mess with it. It'd be quicker lol. It'd also probably be the last time I'll have to deal with the condition of these bolts as I intend to stay on the maintenance/replacement schedule of the shocks.

    Idk. I probably just need to sleep on it. Perhaps I should buy one of those 2000 ft/lb impacts you see all the tire guys lugging around lol. I wonder if there's enough clearance for one. Oh, and Xsetra, I figured out what the TA mechanic meant. My rear shocks have the offset bushings. Basically I just have to install the shorter side facing out - no measuring required like I was originally lead to believe. My best guess is that the offset helps to keep things vertical in order to reduce any shearing forces as the shock bounces.
     
  11. train777

    train777 Bobtail Member

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    Acetylene torch and impact wrench is all you need. I normally replace the front shocks when I am putting new steering tires, no matter if they leaked or not. The same goes for the drive axle shocks.
     
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