Close call

Discussion in 'Flatbed Trucking Forum' started by Jumbo, Jun 14, 2012.

  1. Kansas

    Kansas Road Train Member

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    Apr 14, 2009
    aircap, Ks.
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    Depends on how they were stacked. Remember I had ten sticks, and they were stacked. Mine were banded 2 sets of 4 sitting side by side with the last two banded together on top.

    OO​
    OOOO​
    OOOO​

    What I noticed as I started throwing straps is the straps were only contacting the two top pipes. If the bands broke, the pipes would have spread and there would have been slack in my straps, and zero tension to hold them. Let alone the fact that in an e brake situation there was nothing keeping them from sliding.
     
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  3. nd4spdz

    nd4spdz Bobtail Member

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    May 31, 2012
    Merrill,Wisconsin
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    all I know is ill be out on the road in the next two weeks .. im a green horn .. but I am NOT loosing Anything off my flatbed .. the more straps/chains the better .... LOL there is enough for me to worry about on the road just driving .. i dont need to worry about loosing something because I didnt take the time to make sure .. :)
     
  4. OpenRoadDreamer

    OpenRoadDreamer Road Train Member

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    Apr 26, 2011
    Alabama
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    Always ensure there's more securement on than is required. Easier to explain why there's so much on the load, than explain why the load is .OT on.
     
  5. Roscopeco

    Roscopeco Light Load Member

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    Jul 11, 2010
    Mcloud,OK.
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    Wow! Hard to believe. Company policy where I'm at ,chain or strap every 6ft on load, and chain holding strength would have to match weight of coil. Our chains are rated at a 4.000lbs,so a 40.000 lb coil would get 10 chains. Fun No! But I do'nt want to worry about it going down the road. And plus I throw 2 straps on top. I secure my stuff that no matter how bad the road conditions get I will not have to worry unless something freaky happens.Ca'nt remember correctly ,believe DOT specs are 2 pcs of securement when ld is between 6 to 12 ft long?
     
  6. Logan76

    Logan76 Crusty In Training

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    Jul 12, 2009
    kittanning, PA
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    Your nut's, 10 chains on a coil!

    I'm all for safety but the law states you need to match 50% of your loads weight in securement. If you don't believe me just look it up in your green book, its called aggregate working load limit.

    I double secure (100% match weight to securement) if a load is going to Canada, that's my company policy.

    Some loads I haul may end up having more securement than required if the load needs it, such as those cluster #### loads of trim board I haul end up with 14 or more straps on them...

    If I load for example 30k of steel plate that is say 20 feet long, i would throw 1 header/bunk chain, 2 chains on each end over the top and 1 strap between the 2 chains.
     
  7. not4hire

    not4hire Road Train Member

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    May 16, 2012
    Calgary
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    Any reasoning given for that policy? We have the same securement standard up here with a few very minor exceptions.
     
  8. Logan76

    Logan76 Crusty In Training

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    Jul 12, 2009
    kittanning, PA
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    They told us that Canada requires more securement, they didn't say what % of the load but they make us double secure it all, I loaded cored wire for ontario yesterday.
     
  9. dorset

    dorset Medium Load Member

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    Dec 28, 2009
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    if it's blocked from forward motion, one tiedown is minimum for zero up to 10 feet, one more for every ten or fraction of ten after.

    if it's not blocked, one tiedown is minimum for zero up to five feet, total of two tiedowns if it's five to ten, one more for every ten or fraction of ten after.

    if it weighs more than 1100 pounds, two tiedowns is minimum from zero to ten feet, one more for every ten or fraction of ten after.
     
  10. S3XTION8

    S3XTION8 Bobtail Member

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    Jun 19, 2012
    Windsor, ON
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    Hi, I am a noob who is currently in CDL training doing the enhanced flatbed training as well here in Canada. I understand that flatbed is one of the higher paying jobs out there and I like the fact that it actually involves physical work to secure/tarp loads. I would really appreciate any helpful tips or info anyone could provide for someone coming out on the road. I have previous experience (6 yrs) shunting bulk trailers around CN yards so I am fairly familiar with driving. I know flatbed can be dangerous and am aware of some of the hazards that can happen. I'm also aware that it's better to over secure the load on the side of caution than to be sorry I didn't later. If there is any useful info anyone can provide a greenhorn like me I would appreciate it very much. Thank you and stay safe.
     
  11. Kittyfoot

    Kittyfoot Crusty Ancient

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    Sep 21, 2009
    Sorrento, Louisiana
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    Couple of months back I came upon a wreck site involving a flatbed and a 4wheeler. 4wheeler came off a ramp at speed and hit the tractor right in the tandems causing a rollover. As we edged past the trailer I noticed the rack kit was still in place but the tarp was torn loose. Right there in the middle of the trailer (which was on it's side) was a nice big shiny coil.... still securely in place. Now that my friends is a good securement job.:yes2557:
     
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