Forcing gas into the tank

Discussion in 'Tanker, Bulk and Dump Trucking Forum' started by ronjeremyjr, Dec 3, 2020.

  1. ronjeremyjr

    ronjeremyjr Light Load Member

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    Recently got a job hauling fuel still in training but everything’s good. One station the overfill alarm went off. Me and trainer continued dropping and connector started making sounds and shaking a little. So what my trainer did is take the measuring stick that had part of it cut off put it in tank then put connector over it and started dropping again. Everything went in tank but he told me we’re not supposed to do that but he didn’t want to take load elsewhere. Can someone explain how to do this or if you do how to make sure it will all fit in tank
     
    Lumper Humper Thanks this.
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  3. REO6205

    REO6205 Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    Don't do that. Your trainer is lazy, a poor example to follow, and dangerous.
    You might get away with it but the one time you don't you'll have a spill and a lot of explaining to do.
     
  4. Life on Wheels

    Life on Wheels Light Load Member

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    **Assuming y'all printed a Veeder Root prior to unloading, AND stuck the tank to check the accuracy of the Veeder**
    Let's say the 90% ullage was 5,782 gallons on that tank (I'm just making up numbers as an example). If you loaded 6,000 gallons of that product at the rack, you're over by 218 gallons, right?
    There is a flapper in the vertical pipe that you drop into that prevents overfills (sometimes you can see it when you look into the pipe). All he did is jam the flapper open with the tank stick so he could finish the delivery.
    Assuming the 100% ullage is more than the 6,000 gallons you brought, the remaining 218 gallons will fit, especially if cars are getting gas while you're offloading.
    Of course it's a PITA to have to do another delivery for only 218 gallons, but you should get paid for it. My company would call it a split load, and pay me accordingly. I've never done what you're describing because, again, I get paid for the second delivery, and I'm too chickens%@t, or let's say paranoid, of something going wrong.
    Lastly, if you're only over by 218 gallons, and it's a busy station, you can wait for the fuel to sell down and finish the delivery. Let's say you estimate 15 gallons per car per fill up on average, well 15 customers will be 225 gallons. Voilà!

    Hopefully I answered your questions of what he did, how it worked, and gave you an alternative to doing that because you really shouldn't.
     
    meechyaboy, scott180, 91B20H8 and 5 others Thank this.
  5. ErieMcDreary

    ErieMcDreary Medium Load Member

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    HUGE NO-NO!!!!!!
    Life on wheels explained it very well. There are youtube animations showing what is happening under the ground to help visualize it.
    When the hose starts jumping and making those sounds, it is the underground fuel level bouncing the flapper closed. As soon as that hose starts jumping you need to shut it down. That's why you stay close to the internal valves.
     
  6. REO6205

    REO6205 Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    Anything is better than having a spill. Waiting, going to a different station, even taking the retain back to the loading point is preferable to a spill.
    When you have a spill, besides the obvious danger of a fire, you'll be talking to people from the fire department, the local LEO, whatever environmental agency in your area that handles hazmat violations, the news media, and your own company. None of them are going to be sympathetic and their main task will be assigning blame. Guess who gets the blame? All the blame? Unless a hose or fitting malfunctions it's strictly your fault. Period.
    Ask the safety guy at your company or the terminal manager what happens when there's a spill. Chances are, if they've been in the business long enough, that they've dealt with a spill before. They'll be able to tell you what you should have done to prevent it.
    Anything you do that prevents a spill is well worth the time and money it costs the company. Fines for spills are hideously expensive and they stay on your record forever.
    I've only dealt with one spill. The driver was pumping into an above ground tank with a metered register and he was supposed to put half the load into one tank and half in another. He ran the first tank over by simply not watching the meter close enough. We had an estimated five hundred gallons of JetA on the ground by the time he got it shut off. By the time everything was settled we were on the hook for the spill cleanup, fines from EPA. fines from the local fire department, and of course we lost the haul. Our total costs were well over one hundred thousand dollars and we got off light. It could have been a lot more.
    The driver claimed the meter malfunctioned but the first thing that gets done in a case like that is a calibration check on the meter. It was perfect. He tried to cover up the spill with sand and a shovel but it was way too big. He then tried washing it down with a water hose. That didn't work either. Then, after trying to hide what he'd done, he called me at the office and told me several lies about what happened. I called the fire department and they took it from there.
    So please, no spills.
    And yes, I fired the driver.

    I'll get off my soapbox now.
     
  7. REO6205

    REO6205 Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    Exactly right. I've seen guys sit in the cab and take a nap while they were unloading. That would get a person fired at most tanker companies I know of.
     
  8. ronjeremyjr

    ronjeremyjr Light Load Member

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    I like to do things the proper way but he’s been doing this longer than me and I guess knows a few tricks. But If I were him I’d be worried about something going wrong and I don’t want to have to explain it to anyone.
     
  9. keebler13579

    keebler13579 Medium Load Member

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    Problem is he would probably try to pin the spill on you even though you are in training
     
  10. REO6205

    REO6205 Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    It wouldn't be the first time that some rookie got thrown under the bus because his trainer took a short cut that back-fired on him.
     
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  11. kemosabi49

    kemosabi49 Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    I would ask for a different trainer. One that taught me the correct way.
     
    ronjeremyjr Thanks this.
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