Hauling Hazmat

Discussion in 'Experienced Truckers' Advice' started by BigNorm4Life, May 2, 2017.

  1. BigNorm4Life

    BigNorm4Life Bobtail Member

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    Jan 21, 2017
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    For all my trucking veterens... asides from whats in the book

    What are the real life Do's and Don't DO's when hauling placarded hazardous loads... would I really be target by DOT... specifically New York state DOT all the time

    Edit.. spell checked messed with title
     
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  3. uncleal13

    uncleal13 Road Train Member

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    Having placards displayed when they are not actually required is just as bad.
     
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  4. BigNorm4Life

    BigNorm4Life Bobtail Member

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    Jan 21, 2017
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    Really.. okay I got it

    If there's no load.. makes sure all placard are hidden and to make sure if you are hauling a hazmat... make sure to use the SPECIFIC PLACARED

    edit.... Question, someone stuff only calls to be placarded if over 1001 pounds.. are you refering to when its under that?
     
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  5. TheRipper

    TheRipper Medium Load Member

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    Hey,

    Placarded correctly and when needed. Your company should be able to help if you don't know what placard is needed. I use tape to keep them in the holders because I've lost a few of the flimsy sticker ones.

    Keep bills with erg in the door pouch at all times.

    Securement needs to be very good. I've had DOT break my seal twice now to check securement. Blocked, braced, and strapped. No movement possible.

    Make sure your truck is good to go in all aspects. DOT is not lenient with a truck carrying hazmat. Also, make sure your logs are always correct.

    There's probably more, but my brain is dead today...
     
  6. Klleetrucking

    Klleetrucking Medium Load Member

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    Be absolutely sure the Hazmat DOT books are within easy reach. An acquaintance got written up because she had to unbuckle her seatbelt to reach the guidebooks.
    Some of the tanker guys should be along with more advice.
     
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  7. TheRipper

    TheRipper Medium Load Member

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    ERG or emergency response guide is the book you're speaking of. Easiest to keep it with bills in door pouch.
     
  8. Lepton1

    Lepton1 Road Train Member

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    Turn on four ways and stop at all railroad crossings.
     
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  9. EZ Money

    EZ Money Road Train Member

    Parking on ramps or places like Walmart is not a good idea either.

    Be sure the shipper marks everything correct and they should supply the needed placards.
    Should have the emergency response phone number on the bill of lading.
    Like already said,Load securement is a must! DOT is hard on that with a placard load as well as tires,brakes and everything else.

    Those ERG books get updated every so often so have the latest edition in the truck door.
     
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  10. EZ Money

    EZ Money Road Train Member

    If they did not teach you this....Scale at a CAT scale before going far....The scale house will not let you slide tandems with a hazmat load.....At least many states will not allow it.
     
  11. 201

    201 Road Train Member

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    Placarded trailers stick out like sore thumbs. Years ago, and I DO NOT recommend this today, but years ago, regs were a lot looser, and someone would hand us placards, we'd get outside, throw them right in the garbage, and make out our own BOL, "Freight, all kinds". You'd be amazed at how many haz-mat loads, that worked with, especially off the rail, which never had them anyway, even though there was haz on them. Big fine for that, but same thing, it all came down to money. Sure, I could have refused the load, but it was 1am at the rail yard, scale in the Badger was usually closed at night, if not, we knew about it, and it was better just to haul it, under the cover of darkness, deliver it at 6am, and have an empty wagon to reload for the day, rather than babysitting the load from the night before. I never got caught, but I knew I was tempting fate, and would never think of doing that today, but that was part of being an "outlaw" then. It all came down to money.
     
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