IRP cab card update

Discussion in 'Heavy Haul Trucking Forum' started by flat-step, May 1, 2015.

  1. flat-step

    flat-step Light Load Member

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    May 11, 2011
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    Hello All,

    I just bought my first RGN which has flip axle with it. I need to update my IRP cab card for increased weight that will now be hauling. I was checking the IRP website for weights and was surprised that not many states have more than 80,000 lbs maximum weight allowance. Now does that mean that every time i'm over the max weight in that state i'll need a permit? Kinda confusing. I request all the seasoned heavy haulers to kindly advise me on this so that can get my cab card updated and start using the trailer to its potential. Thank You.
     
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  3. Edgar2191

    Edgar2191 Light Load Member

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    Apr 9, 2013
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    Yes anytime ur over 80k u will need a permit. And in some states depending on your axles you will also need a permit.
     
  4. 315wheelbase

    315wheelbase Heavy Load Member

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    Some states will not issue an overweight permit unless registered heavy,,some like WA and OR will allow up to 105,500 with out a permit if you have more than 5 axles. OK and LA will allow more with with out a permit with more than 5 axles on non interstate roads.

    Register higher weights in these states
    IA 132,000
    ID 105,500
    KS 85,500L
    A 88,000
    MI 150,000
    MN 132,000
    MT 132,000
    ND 105,500
    NE 94,000
    OK 90,000
    OR 105,500
    WA 105,500
    WY 117,000

    You need to register for 80,000 in the other states,,it only cost a couple hundred for the higher weights,,if you don't you could be denied an over weight permit .
     
    snowman_w900 and 281ric Thank this.
  5. Rontonio

    Rontonio Road Train Member

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    or in MN you could be issued the overweight permit,but then it be invalid as you are not registered for the correct weight.....not important how I know this
     
  6. 281ric

    281ric Road Train Member

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    Oct 20, 2011
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    I believe Capes " getting my feet wet in heavy haul" has info on it.
     
  7. flat-step

    flat-step Light Load Member

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    May 11, 2011
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    Thank You all for the valuable info. Much appreciated..
     
  8. Caterpillar Cowboy

    Caterpillar Cowboy Heavy Load Member

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    Getting my stuff into a pile (attempting to) to go IRP Apportioned, Trying to figure this stuff out. Tired of buying trip permits and running out of them in Idaho.

    My 7 axle at 65 feet IIRC is good to 97,000 in Wyo, 98,000 in ID, and 97,910 in MT. (only states I NEED to get figured out soon)

    Do I need to license to 117,000 in Wyo, 105,500 in ID, and 132,000 in MT just to be able to buy permits? I don't think so but the way some of you folks worded it I'm beginning to dbout myself and what my local Port officers say at least for Wyo...
     
  9. Rontonio

    Rontonio Road Train Member

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    Aug 9, 2009
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  10. Caterpillar Cowboy

    Caterpillar Cowboy Heavy Load Member

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    Okay, so declare what my max bridge is for my setup for each of the over 80,000 states and I should be ready set go right?
     
  11. Oxbow

    Oxbow Road Train Member

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    Idaho
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    I am sure that you have this figured out by now, but I'm from Idaho, IRP licensed, and buy an annual overweight/oversize permit (for Idaho) that is based upon my axle spacings, and then given a chart to show how much weight is allowed on the interstate and various highways. I only need to license for 80K, and the non-divisible permit covers the rest. The annual permit only costs $128, but then I must report quarterly on how many miles I traveled at each weight class, and pay according to the gross weight which gets expensive when I get over 135,000 gross on 7 axles ($.74 per mile in my case). When I am 80k to 108k it is only 4 cents per mile, and these fees are collected on the honor system.

    Licensing for 105,500 is for divisible loads, and requires an annual excess weight permit and adherence to standard axle/bridge formulas. It is very reasonable to purchase as well, and then there are no quarterly mileage/weight fees to be paid.

    What is kind of expensive for me, as we rent a lot of equipment, is Wyoming's oversize and overweight permit rules that a permit is only good for a specific truck/trailer/equipment combination. In other words, if I haul a 329 in from Idaho and haul a different 329 out of Wyoming, I have to get a separated permit for each. I can by an annual oversize for our excavator, and by a 6 month permit for the overweight on our excavator that is for however many miles I want (in 300 mile increments I believe), but it has to be the same excavator on the same trailer pulled by the same tractor.

    I am a contractor that primarily hauls our own equipment, or that that we rent for one of our projects. I do have an MC# and can haul for hire, but that is usually restricted to the occasional haul for the equipment dealer that we work with. Most of the folks here are hauling for a living so much of what applies to me probably does not apply to you.

    Old thread, but maybe this will help someone hauling in our area.

    Happy New Year!
     
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