Is there really a trucker shortage?

Discussion in 'Questions From New Drivers' started by Jbrow327, Oct 24, 2021.

  1. Jbrow327

    Jbrow327 Light Load Member

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    You hear on the news that the country needs 50,000 truckers. It sounds quite excessive. What do you guys think?
     
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  3. Midwest Trucker

    Midwest Trucker Road Train Member

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    IMO, Yes. But that’s not what’s wrong with the supply chain. You won’t see inflation due to truck drivers until the covid mandate happens.
     
  4. Kyle G.

    Kyle G. Road Train Member

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    The news says a lot of things that aren't true.
     
  5. buddyd157

    buddyd157 Road Train Member

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    yes...

    company A, is short 2 drivers

    company B, has 6 more drivers than they have freight for

    company C, has the correct amount of drivers to trucks and freight

    how many apple's did Betty put into her blueberry pie recipe..????
     
  6. Tall Mike

    Tall Mike Road Train Member

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    I think its BS put out there by the incompetent current administration and their propaganda arm the MSM.. They need something or someone to blame this mess we are in on..

    Let's go Brandon....
     
  7. olddog_newtricks

    olddog_newtricks Medium Load Member

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    There's no shortage of drivers. Just a shortage of people who are willing to be treated like garbage for crap pay.
     
  8. bryan21384

    bryan21384 Road Train Member

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    I've always said it depends on who you ask, but I'm starting to lean on the side of a driver shortage. It's not just a driver shortage, it's a worker shortage in every line of work. You've got an ever growing population, ever growing commerce, ever growing job market. All of those thoughts in mind, it's more work than there are workers. Many folks anticipated a shortage years back, and covid seems to have exposed a lot of flaws in our society. Many members are going to come on here and say, that the shelves are full so that means no shortage, and in my opinion, that's lazy, tunnel visioned thinking. For flatbed drivers, it's always been an extremely favorable load to driver ratio. There's a shortage there; probably the same goes for tankers, hazmat, and other specialized areas of trucking. It may also be a shortage of drivers in certain parts of the country too. Many older truckers were getting out before covid occurred. It ain't like people are getting a CDL and staying in the industry. I think it's something like 400k new CDLs are given out yearly, and in theory we should be good, but it's 3 mil or so drivers out here, and not all are OTR. Those numbers may not be quite accurate so anyone can correct me if need be.
     
  9. bryan21384

    bryan21384 Road Train Member

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    The news had to get that info somewhere, so is it the news or is the source the put out the press release? I don't know so much if what they say isn't true, but moreso things that don't necessarily line up with viewers opinions.
     
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  10. LoneRanger

    LoneRanger Road Train Member

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    Owner operators who don’t haul cheap freight? Ya there’s a shortage of those.
     
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  11. JolliRoger

    JolliRoger Road Train Member

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    I think the reference is usually styled "Driver" shortage. Tho I haven't driven for years, I have been associated in the equipment business and have observed the erosion of trucking. The days of the stable well managed trucking company, offering safe, dependable delivery service has been gone. The "truckers"or "drivers"of yesteryear are mostly gone (health/age) or are knowledgeable enough to get out of the business.

    Trucking is now a "business", run by business administration graduates, financed by investment groups, and controlled by the most intricate set of regulations known to man. The days of a man getting a truck, offering service from here to there, of this type freight, is hardly possible. The cost of truck, trailer, insurance,
    legal requirement compliance are almost prohibitive. It is possible, and a few hardy souls do it and succeed. Notice the word few.

    It takes real determination, savvy basic business knowledge, and willingness to "marry" the job until he gets "on his feet" to become an owner/operator or small fleet owner. Even then, changes in a states regulations may cut off services you were providing and changes have to be made. In the last few years changes thru federal and state regulations have practically "revolutionized" trucking.

    It seems that everything is aimed at hamstringing truck transportation into cities, with no alternate delivery method offered. There used to be truck routes to allow reasonable access to industrial areas. Now there are 'No Truck" signs scattered seemly at random. Or limited access hours that do not mesh with needed delivery times.
    There is no "driver" shortage. "Drivers have seen the light and decided to adapt and change to maintain their desired lifestyle. Why work a full week of 70 hours; in poor weather and working/sleeping conditions, for the same he can make in 40 hours at another trade and even be appreciated there by name.
    There is a lack of qualified trainees starting and getting experience. But, "So many are called, so few are chosen", applies as "So many think it is easy to drive big trucks, make big bucks" , a popular recruiting slogan. The result is the now near chaos in the trucking industry. Accidents, injuries, rising insurance rates, fuel, repairs, and other maintenance costs create deviations causing financial distress, large carriers and small lease operators.

    It is the industry's fault; along with over regulation, that has led to the question:Who needs this grief. I can do as well and often better in other endeavors.
     
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