Is trucking for me?

Discussion in 'Expediter and Hot Shot Trucking Forum' started by Number21, Nov 25, 2014.

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  1. Ridgeline

    Ridgeline Road Train Member

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    you forget the thing called taxes, and then there is your own authority, you are going to do this interstate thing.
     
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  3. Number21

    Number21 Bobtail Member

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    I'm kind of hard to explain. I've run several different businesses in my life. Most recently I've had a business selling and refurbishing vintage outboard motor parts, but I've had some health problems and it's hard for me to keep up in the shop these days. I think I can handle driving around a lot better. I've got some rental properties that help keep the basics covered, so whatever I do with my time, is how I get my beer money. :) I've never driven professionally but I've always had trucks and worked on them myself.

    You only have to pay taxes on profit so I'm happy to pay them. :) Also now I can write off my truck and miles as a business expense. Is there more to getting your own authority than DOT/MC numbers, insurance, and CDL?

    I talked to a friend of a friend who does this last night and he told me he was doing alright delivering RVs. He goes all the way out to Indiana unloaded to get them and then gets the ones coming back west. I need to go get some real insurance quotes...
     
  4. QUAD 40

    QUAD 40 Bobtail Member

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    here are two websites that may give you some answers. First is hotshotcarrier.com. they have information on all aspects of the hotshot business. they even have a loadboard that shows partial loads available from all states. great info for getting started. The second is bbtoledo.com. they specialize in insurance for rv transporters and hotshots. on their website they have a video that explains the types of insurance coverage needed. I have read reports from other rv transporters that recommend this company. try looking here for your answers.

    hope this helps you in your search.
     
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  5. Lite bug

    Lite bug Road Train Member

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    Number 21 yes that is the kind of background that would be a benifit having idea of how things work. The vintage knowledge could be a asset. I ran into a guy that ran a fab shop ( HVAC duct work, said his health did not allow him to continue to operate ) he used his contacts in the industry a lot of his competitors. He started delivering their products. He was using a SWD f350 pulling a tag-a-long he said he had to prove to his wife he could make a profit before investing in a gooseneck and dually, was using what he already had to start.
     
  6. crzyjarmans

    crzyjarmans Road Train Member

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    Not sure if this was covered, didn't read all post, but there is more to it than truck and insurance, DOT. number, you will need just about everything a big truck needs in order to transport OTR
     
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  7. Number21

    Number21 Bobtail Member

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    What else is there? Can somebody help me make a list?
    1. Buy insurance
    2. Get DOT numbers
    3. Get a CDL
    4. Keep log books, follow all the rules.
    5. ?

    Of course, finding loads is still the big thing. I've got a spreadsheet going so I want to mark down every possible expense.
     
  8. 67jeeptruck

    67jeeptruck Bobtail Member

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    Sure you disagree, you haven't done it. It is VERY difficult to find loads that fit your rig. Hotshot is for the shipper/receiver who needs it yesterday. If they didn't then they would use regular freight. The distances you are looking at is certainly big rig territory. Like it or not, the big trucks are your competition. Yes, you can find loads, but it is VERY hard. Plus you will be zig zagging your way both directions. When you say "smaller/quicker/cheaper" smaller and quicker maybe. but if you are truly doing Hotshot freight, you can actually charge MORE per mile because you are able to do the small load quicker. Key is a very good broker who does hot shot freight. I did a special well head they needed FAST. I got $4.00 per mile, and with my 4x4 Dodge I got it out to the pad and it was all mud and deep ruts. I was actually hired more than once to meet a big truck on the road, and then take his load into the well pad. Those were great paying gigs. Too bad there wasn't more of it.

    I find it ironic that you mention people don't use big trucks to haul RV's. They are, and in increasing numbers. They get out on the road with their F-350 or Ram 3500 and find in short order they don't have the brakes they would like to see, nor the power to get up the hills as well as they would like. Then after a couple of years of RV ing, they have a truck that has been beat to death. I talked with a couple who bought a NEW Dodge 5500 and it was just not doing the job. They got rid of it and bought a used Volvo, installed a small flatbed, bought a little Smart car, and they carry it around in safety with good brakes, and more than enough power hauling their big 5th wheel. In addition, the comfort level with air ride compared to spring ride is a huge difference.

    One thing I have to mention. You said your health is messing with you, and you feel driving will be ok. The driving is a very small part of this type of work. Flat bed freight is a lot tougher than you might think. Chaining down loads, cinching straps, getting loads re-packed in correctly, is all very challenging at times. Yes some is easy as can be. I got my truck loaded at a warehouse one afternoon at quitting time. It was all BOXED, and on skids. I was told each box had the same weight. When I got going, I found they were not. They loaded me NOSE heavy. I had to drive to an equipment rental yard I found open, rent a fork lift, and reload it myself. An extra expense, and cost me time. Point is, if it can happen, it will. If I had a big truck that day, the loading would not have been that sensitive, and I would not have had to reload it.

    Who knows how he is making it. But he probably isn't going interstate. He probably has a good broker he has hooked up with who gets him the right loads.

    I know taxes were mentioned. It isn't just on profit. There are fuel taxes, and road use taxes too.

    Good luck with your endeavor. I wish you well.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2014
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  9. 67jeeptruck

    67jeeptruck Bobtail Member

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    I wanted to mention. There is a u ship website out there, where people want all kinds of things moved. You could try something like that. Possibly you can just haul household goods for people that will just fit in your truck, with no trailer. For something like that, I don't think people are even going with regular shippers. Meaning maybe it falls in a gray area with no extra costs. Sort of like take Grandpa's favorite recliner to him in your truck. Is it legal? I dunno. As a retired trucker, it wouldn't bother me if folks are doing stuff like this. Wouldn't hurt my income even if I was still working.
     
  10. Number21

    Number21 Bobtail Member

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    I'm sorry, but my F350 was more or less designed for pulling travel trailers. That is their market. Conversely travel trailers are designed to be pulled with a 250 or 350, because that's what Ma and Pa have to tow their new trailer with. A big rig would use more fuel and cost more to maintain. Now, a 40' flatbed loaded down with 15,000lbs or more, I totally agree, my truck ain't meant for that. I don't want to try that. I've towed a 32' travel trailer with my truck and it was pretty effortless. I've seen hotshot guys on the road with two travel trailers stacked on another trailer being pulled with a one ton, and that seems like a job for a big rig.

    Don't get me wrong, I wouldn't be against getting a big truck if it was profitable and I could go across country like I want, but that definitely isn't going to happen first.

    That is definitely an issue for me. That's why I would be leaning towards RVs or a small car hauler. I realize those are probably the cheaper loads also. I can usually be active for an hour or so, and then I need to rest. (driving counts as rest)

    It all comes back to "I'm going there anyway I might as well drag something with me". Insurance is still the killer there.

    I've looked, I *think* they are still looking for your MC number and insurance. Still something I need to look into a little more for smaller loads. Don't like the whole bidding thing there though.
     
  11. 67jeeptruck

    67jeeptruck Bobtail Member

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    Nov 24, 2014
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    Please, get out there and haul long distance, pay the costs of getting your authority, tags, pay your road and fuel taxes, and beat your F-350 to death. I have logged over 3 million revenue miles in my time. Probably more. I have also done the RV thing for another "job" for over 10 years. In those 10 years I beat several tow units to death. I've been in the trenches on both those ends, trucks, and RV's. In that time, I have talked with many people who have been very disappointed in their 1 ton power unit. I am not talking about the weekend camper. I am talking about people who do it full time and live on the road. Many are SAVING money by going to a good used Class 8 truck, and getting rid of their 1 ton, 4500 and 5500 trucks. I don't care how much you enjoy your F-350. They are not designed to last a million miles or more, and certainly not if you work them hard.

    Please, tell me what is the difference between a gooseneck with 15,000 lbs on it, and a 17,000 lb 5th wheel? In many cases it is harder on the truck because of wind resistance dragging you down in addition to the weight.

    [​IMG]

    This singled Volvo set up to haul either bumper pull, or 5th wheel just sold for $56,000.
    Me I would keep the tandems, but each person does what they want. Included in the cost was setting up
    the bed to haul the Smart car.

    The bidding thing is also alive and well with full and LTL many times.

    It is a tough job, period. People go broke doing it, full size truck, expediters, and hot shot 1 tons.

    And, per DOT regulations, driving certainly is NOT resting. Perhaps the first stop for you is to see if you can pass the DOT physical. Maybe you can, maybe you can't. Certain diseases can certainly disqualify you.
     
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