Just some of the stupid things I see

Discussion in 'Trucking Industry Regulations' started by dieselbear, Jan 31, 2010.

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  1. johnday

    johnday Road Train Member

    I agree with brsims, drop this loser ASAP. Sounds like I'm familiar with the company you're with. If it is, most of the trainers I ran into there leave alot to be desired, although there were a couple actually interested in training a new guy.:biggrin_25510:
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2010
  2. dieselbear

    dieselbear Road Train Member

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    Yes as long as they are continous 10 hours.
     
  3. dieselbear

    dieselbear Road Train Member

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    §395.2 Definitions.

    On duty time means all time from the time a driver begins to work or is required to be in readiness to work until the time the driver is relieved from work and all responsibility for performing work. On-duty time shall include:
    (1) All time at a plant, terminal, facility, or other property of a motor carrier or shipper, or on any public property, waiting to be dispatched, unless the driver has been relieved from duty by the motor carrier;
    (2) All time inspecting, servicing, or conditioning any commercial motor vehicle at any time;
    (3) All driving time as defined in the term driving time;
    (4) All time, other than driving time, in or upon any commercial motor vehicle except time spent resting in a sleeper berth;
    (5) All time loading or unloading a commercial motor vehicle, supervising, or assisting in the loading or unloading, attending a commercial motor vehicle being loaded or unloaded, remaining in readiness to operate the commercial motor vehicle, or in giving or receiving receipts for shipments loaded or unloaded;
    (6) All time repairing, obtaining assistance, or remaining in attendance upon a disabled commercial motor vehicle;
    (7) All time spent providing a breath sample or urine specimen, including travel time to and from the collection site, in order to comply with the random, reasonable suspicion, post-accident, or follow-up testing required by part 382 of this subchapter when directed by a motor carrier;
    (8) Performing any other work in the capacity, employ, or service of, a motor carrier; and
    (9) Performing any compensated work for a person who is not a motor carrier.


    Now for the intrepratations:


    Question 8: If a “driver trainer” occasionally drives a CMV, thereby becoming a “driver” (regardless of whether he/she is paid for driving), must the driver record all non driving (training) time as on-duty (not driving)?
    Guidance: Yes

    Question 13: What is the duty status of a co-driver (truck)who is riding seated next to the driver?
    Guidance: On-duty (not driving).

    Sounds like the guys already nailed the question and gave you good answers. Take care and good luck.
     
  4. Brickman

    Brickman Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    Lets say the rookie only wanted to drive for 8 hrs the trainer still has a lot of hrs left for him to run a lot more than 200 miles.
     
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  5. otherhalftw

    otherhalftw Insignificant Otter

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    If this "trainer" wants to max out his miles...and train of course...why not just perch his butt on the bunk and watch from the middle...sleep and watch...after the first week, when I was comfortable with my students, that is how I maxed out the miles for my pay...and was available for questions or comments while student was driving...plus I would pop in a movie and such....covers the sleeper part of the log, gets attention to the student, and I get my rest....it isn't rocket science...but I was smart enough to know if I was tired I slept...student the same!

    Plus the student wouldn't even know I was watching...he/she was literally glued to the little white line and the scenery!
     
  6. Lurchgs

    Lurchgs Road Train Member

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    y'know.. it's been a couple years since I went out with a trainer... and he did much the same thing. After the first few days - when he became moderately sure I'd not run over a tree or something - he spent most of his time lounging in the sleeper. He was in the center, facing forward - and spending a LOT of quality time on the phone.

    I'll give him this, though - he was paying attention. When he saw something that needed addressing, he leaned forward and worked me through it.

    Even so, and even after all this time, I'm not sure how I feel about the practice.
     
  7. Brickman

    Brickman Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    Is that approach following the letter of the law?
    yup, sure is

    Is it following the intent of the law?????
    I'll let your conscience decide.
     
  8. otherhalftw

    otherhalftw Insignificant Otter

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    Sleeper berth does not mean, or intend "sleeping"...sleeper berth is nothing more than an actual location. The only "intent" given in this group of rules and regulations...not laws as they are not voted on by Congress..State or Fed...in any case...the only intent is to ensure the minimum amount of time required in a break period from driving or on duty. It doesn't in any way, shape, or form demand or require "sleep".
     
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  9. Brickman

    Brickman Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

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    The EXPECTATION by the law writers is that adequate sleep time is taken, so as to try and ensure safety on the roads by the drivers.


    I was more referring to the actions of the "trainer" in trying to "train" from the sleeper.
     
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  10. otherhalftw

    otherhalftw Insignificant Otter

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    If you think about it...what can't be done from perching, in the middle of the bunk, that would be just as easy or difficult from the passenger seat. Driving the rig down the interstate really isn't technical stuff...now in town, truck stop, shipper/receiver, where there is activity all around the truck, then, yes the trainer should be up with the student. But, as I said, driving son the interstate perching is suitable...besides the mirror visibility is better from center than from one side.
     
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