Log book not needed for local?

Discussion in 'Trucking Industry Regulations' started by clayshot, Mar 13, 2014.

  1. clayshot

    clayshot Light Load Member

    115
    78
    Oct 30, 2013
    near Philly, Pa.
    0
    I'm about to start with a very small company {12 trucks} running with in 100 miles. He says I don't need to use a log. My concern is, I will be running across multiple state lines. {PA,NJ,NY,DE,MD} Isn't that consider interstate commerce? I always thought running logs interstate is required.

    One more glitch to this job is, there is one run down to NC which for sure needs log book. He contends, I'll only need to run a log for this trip. This doesn't sound right to me. DOT requires 8 day history, right? I don't want DOT problems. On top of that, the NC run will be placarded loads. In my mind, I need to run a log book all the time.

    I really want this job. I got this job thru a mutual friend and love the home time and money offered. Plus the guy is running good, well kept equipment.
    Any thoughts on this?
     
    Dominick253 Thanks this.
  2. Truckers Report Jobs

    Trucking Jobs in 30 seconds

    Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport.

  3. rbrtwbstr

    rbrtwbstr Road Train Member

    2,796
    5,582
    Jul 11, 2012
    in the bush somewhere
    0
    Your boss is correct. If you stay within 100 air miles, regardless of state lines, you don't need a log book. But you will need to keep record of start and end time, and anytime you work more than 12 hours, you then need to fill out a log sheet for that day. As far as having the previous 7 days, we use a book that shows a week on one page, just write in your start/stop times and all is well. As far as placarded loads, I don't believe there's anything different. If you go beyond your 100 miles, and fill out a log, just make sure you have your time sheets available if you're inspected. Consult your safety regulations book(the 'green book') read section 395.1 part e
     
    Dominick253 and clayshot Thank this.
  4. dude6710

    dude6710 Road Train Member

    2,162
    619
    Mar 26, 2010
    MN
    0
    Use a log book to log. I run one and if you stay within 100 miles log continuously on on duty not driving for up to 12 hours. Note local driver on the log for that day and flag pre/post trips and fuel stops. If you run over 12 hours 100 air miles that day then you can use the same log book.
     
    clayshot Thanks this.
  5. Sublime

    Sublime Road Train Member

    1,529
    1,891
    Jan 18, 2013
    Twin Cities, MN
    0
    Both post #2 and #3 are correct.
     
    clayshot Thanks this.
  6. Dinomite

    Dinomite Road Train Member

    4,092
    4,306
    Sep 6, 2012
    Looking 4 Rocks
    0
    There is nothing stopping you from purchasing your own log book and keeping records just to cover your butt.
     
    clayshot, MJ1657 and 10speed Thank this.
  7. clayshot

    clayshot Light Load Member

    115
    78
    Oct 30, 2013
    near Philly, Pa.
    0
    That's exactly what I was planning on doing.


     
    rabbiporkchop Thanks this.
  8. CondoCruiser

    CondoCruiser The Legend

    19,726
    18,702
    Apr 18, 2010
    Tennessee
    0

    When they go outside the circle then they have to follow the normal rules.

    http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/administration/fmcsr/fmcsrruletext.aspx?reg=395.3

    http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/administration/fmcsr/fmcsrruletext.aspx?reg=395.8

    You can use time cards if you like and when the driver goes outside the circle then he has to log for that time only. Many companies that have local drivers will make them all log just because they have a few drivers go outside the circle but they are more frequent than you. It's a personal choice. Either way is acceptable. You have to consider record keeping which you have to store for 6 months in case of an audit. To me time cards would be easier to use as payroll records. Logbooks are just an added expense when you don't go outside the circle often. I would have the drivers fill out a daily vehicle inspection report (DVIR).

    If you are going to be in the business learn and know the regulations. It will save you a bundle.

    http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/administration/fmcsr/fmcsrguide.aspx?section_type=A
     
  9. MJ1657

    MJ1657 Road Train Member

    7,523
    50,153
    Jan 28, 2012
    Isanti, MN
    0
    I sometimes park at home and sometimes at our shop 20 miles away. If I'm reading question 15 correctly it appears that is ok. Is that how everyone else I'd interpreting that?
     
  10. CondoCruiser

    CondoCruiser The Legend

    19,726
    18,702
    Apr 18, 2010
    Tennessee
    0
    As long as you are inside the circle it shouldn't be an issue. Your workplace is still the same. It's more of a personal conveyance thing parking at home. They would almost have to come to your house to prove different which will never happen.
     
    MJ1657 Thanks this.
  11. Allow Me.

    Allow Me. Trucker Forum STAFF Staff Member

    9,615
    8,831
    May 28, 2009
    Rancho Mirage, Ca.
    0
    To simplify it, just get a log book and enter "local" every day that you are local. Then when you run out of the 100 mi radius, run your log book that day and you'll also have your previous 8 days with you in case you need to show it.
     
    clayshot Thanks this.
  • Truckers Report Jobs

    Trucking Jobs in 30 seconds

    Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport.

  • Draft saved Draft deleted