looking for private instruction for CDL class A licesnse

Discussion in 'Motor Carrier Questions - The Inside Scoop' started by snw219, Apr 30, 2008.

  1. snw219

    snw219 Bobtail Member

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    Apr 30, 2008
    northern, ca
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    My friend and I are looking into training and wondered if there is anyone with a truck that is willing to provide instruction. I live in CA and my friend lives in MI. We found one place in MI that has one-on-one instuction, intense and would receive license after passing taking four, four-hour sessions. They are also a third party testing center and so I would be training on familiar testing ground.

    I would have to go to Michigan and am looking to see if there is anyone or any place near where I live in Northern CA, near Yreka/Mt. Shasta that has the same type of program or someone who is williing to work with me and teach me the ropes and all things necessary to pass the driving test.

    Is there anyone that is willing to train that has several years of experience, preferrably a past OTR trainer with their own truck?

    We can work out the details regarding pricing.

    Thanks, in advance!
     
  2. OhioTruckin

    OhioTruckin Light Load Member

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    Feb 25, 2008
    Cleveland, OH
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    Four 4 hour sessions? Sounds like a CDL mill to me.

    Look into SAGE Technical Services. They have one-on-one training, and everyone talks wonders about them on this site!
     
  3. snw219

    snw219 Bobtail Member

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    Apr 30, 2008
    northern, ca
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    Thanks! I'll look into SAGE. The lessons in Michigan are private instruction and they've found that the longest amount of time their students need due to the concentrated private lesson is 12 to 16 hours, but if more is needed, it is given...at a cost. They keep the costs minimal at $535 (approx.) a day for four hours of instruction, equaling $2300 for everything, including testing fees, a truck to use for testing and private instruction fees. We have to have our permits before receiving the lessons....no OTR with this option but most companies require anyone with less than six months of experience to go with a trainer OTR before earning a regular wage, it seems.

    Thanks again!
     
  4. B-rad

    B-rad Light Load Member

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    Jul 10, 2007
    Eugene, OR
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    Sage Tech of course is going to cost you much more but it is an accredited school which many companies will only hire from. I would make sure that you would be able to be hired just with your CDL. All companies will road test you when you have your CDL to make sure you are competent to drive their trucks and if not, you would probably have to pay for training again at a certified school.
     
  5. Tip

    Tip Tipster

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    2300 total? What a rip. On top of this, you won't be able to get a job at a great company. Those companies usually hire only trainees who've graduated from certified schools, and those programs are a tad more than 16 hours/4 days. Try five weeks. Bad apple outfits, those that are desperate because they have high turnover from all the quitting they see, will hire you in a second, though. But then how long will it be before YOU are quitting?

    See if you can get a grant to pay for this training. Pell grants are good, if you qualify. Also, getting certified training at a community college is possible. Check into it. Don't go paying big money for training out of your own pocket.
     
  6. Big Duker

    Big Duker "Don Cheto"

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    Weatherford, TX
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    $2300. for 16 hours of training is a total ripoff!!! Some of the community colleges around here have 160 hour courses for $3000-4000 and have connections with Fed EX ground contractors and all the others ie"Swift, USA, etc. Most companies want a 160 hour school as a minimum or pay for their schools. Some have decent training, but many don't. ie: england. and you have to stay there a year working for peanuts. Check and see if you can get grant to pay for training from local workforce center. Good luck.
     
  7. Tip

    Tip Tipster

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    160 hours does seem to be the norm. Like both Duker and I said, get a grant. I went to a mill and paid with my own mulla. Every day of the world I wish I had the money back, all five thousand of it. On top of this, during the on-road portion of my mill training, I spent 3/4s of my in-cab time watching another sausage drive, as it was 4 trainees per truck for a half a day, each day, for about 10 days. Let's do the math here:

    3 hours per day on-road, meaning 45 minutes for each sausage
    45 minutes x 10 days, or 450 minutes total driving time for each sausage
    450 minutes / 60 minutes per hour is 7 1/2 hours driving. During my field pad training, I drove maybe 5 hours total. Hmmm. 12-13 hours total on-the-road training time. But it gets better.

    I also spent three weeks studying the manual to get my learner's, which I could have done in only three days. That was 8 hours a day, 5 days a week: 8 x 5 x 3 or about 120 hours spent sitting in a classroom.

    We're talking about 132 hours in my case for 5,000 bones, not counting the opportunity cost (lost income because I was sitting in a classroom and a truck cab instead of working), which probably came to about 4,000. Don't forget that opportunity cost.

    Yeah, it was definitely a rip. Get the grant, man.
     
  8. snw219

    snw219 Bobtail Member

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    Apr 30, 2008
    northern, ca
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    Thanks for all the replies and advice. It helped to confirm what i was thinking about needing 120-160 hours worth of training time. If someone already has their permit, are there less hours required? Also, because we wouldn't be sharing the cab with three or four other students, i thought the concentrated one-on-one time would count for more quality vs. quantity time.

    The name of the school is STAR out of Michigan, Kalamazoo is the one we were looking into. We had been looking into Schneider but i don't like the idea of having to pay back something even if we might be unable to pass the tests. They have the advanced training for those who have their license but have less than six months experience, which is free. One week of classroom and 7-10+ days of OTR with a trainer. We spoke with a recruiter and they said that if we had our license we could go into that program and not owe anything, plus start getting paid in the second week (though not a whole lot).

    I will look into the grant possibility. I am a credentialed teacher in California and our wonderful governator (Schwarzennagor, Arnold) cut our education budget in CA by $5 billion. So, my job is null and void and I am having to look at alternerative earnings. I thought about doing this a few years ago when I was working on my masters and wished that I had followed through. It seems that it might be a good way of paying back my current student loans.

    Thanks again, for all of the advice and help....Blessings to all!

    p.s. Also, the $2300 did sound like a lot of money for 16 hours of training. That's why i thought about seeing if there was a kind soul that might be willing to help train someone for a bit less...show them the ropes for the cost of gas, wear and tear and maybe $20-30 an hour. Possibly a pipe-dream but worth a shot asking.
     
  9. Big Duker

    Big Duker "Don Cheto"

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    You should qualify as a displaced worker if your job was eliminated. That's what most of the grant money is for. More jobs being sent to China and else where the Gov tries to get you into something. Worst they can do is say no.:biggrin_25512:
     
  10. snw219

    snw219 Bobtail Member

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    Apr 30, 2008
    northern, ca
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    i'll look into that. :biggrin_25526:

    i appreciate the help and advice on these db's. my brother drives for interstate and after 20+ years, i think he's found his niche...he has been driving since july 2007.
     
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