PAM Transport and Driver Solutions only care about money

Discussion in 'PAM' started by fdtlaw, Jan 7, 2011.

  1. PapaGrizzly

    PapaGrizzly Light Load Member

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    Feb 11, 2011
    Port Huron MI
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    LOL Sorry but if im in a truck with a guy like that the next words out of my mouth would be "Let me out here please" lol
     
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  3. Noggin

    Noggin Road Train Member

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    Apr 10, 2011
    Houston, TX
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    Just an after thought...I don't think it's going to matter, you seem to not get on anymore...but you mention the doctoring of HIS logs to help YOU gain hours? Wouldn't the "doctoring" be on YOUR logbook? Only way to gain hours is if it is on your log, if I'm not mistaken. If so, being a lawyer, I'm sure you're well aware of the consequences of falsifying a federal document, which is what the log book is. "But he did it, not me" you say? No sir, it is your signature on the log book...
     
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  4. Countryman89

    Countryman89 Bobtail Member

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    Jul 16, 2011
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    I agree that the training should be longer and more thorough. I am a student but my dad has been a truck driver for 26 years. The one thing that I have learned from him is that; As a driver once you take on the responibility of your own truck and set out on your own, you are responsible for what happens to that tractor/trailer. Do I agree with the trainer texting and talking on the phone while driving? No I don't. But the accidents that you had are only mistakes. You take what happened look at it as a leasson learned. The only way to become a better driver is to learn from your mistakes. You have to take responsibility for your own actions and not blame other people for your wrong doing. The truck driving industry is a hard industry, but it's all based on common sense and learning how to handle situations on your own. The getting stuck and needing a tow, that could have been prevented if you would have called dispatch or your broker to get better directions. Not to continue up the road where you didnt have much room to turn around. The Fuel pump accident, it happens brush it off. With problems like that you just have to pay attention to what is around you at all times. Know your distances and remember you're not driving a pickup or a car you are driving a 75ft rig. So you have to compisate for the extra length. I am going to five you one rule of thumb for being a truck driver. It's called RESPECT. Respect yourself, fellow drivers, road conditions, your equipment, and all posted signs or warnings. Once you have taken that in and learned RESPECT you will be a better driver. Respect and be alert at all times. I wish you luck and hope that you will find something sooner then later to help you jumpstart your career.
     
  5. jezter5677

    jezter5677 Light Load Member

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    Jun 11, 2009
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    Very well written Countryman, couldn't of said it any better myself
     
  6. Spunasone

    Spunasone Bobtail Member

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    Jun 25, 2011
    H-town, Texas
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    Truck driving is what you make it...like anything else in life. I went to C1, thought the schooling sucked; just enough to push you out the door. Truckdriving isn't even real work, unless you run flatbeds, so in my book your a whiner! This job requires commonsense, not booksmarts, so I'd say this is not the job for you...
     
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  7. fdtlaw

    fdtlaw Bobtail Member

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    Jan 6, 2011
    Fayetteville, Arkansas
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    I just want to respond to those that indicate that it was ALL my responsibility for what happened to me. Both C1 with the aid of Drivers Solutions along with the individual independent trucking companies have a vested interest in making sure the training is adequate for the roads to be safe and secure. I believe in taking share of some responsibility. But I also believe it is also NOT MY SOLE RESPONSIBILITY because it is the individual trucking companies that need to emphasize safety and training because it is they who HIRE the drivers and are endowed to make the roads safe in their industry.
    There is no doubt, absolutely no doubt in my mind that I could have made it with a trucking company. Yet a few "incidents", no concrete visual employment policies in place or a proper evaluation of the trainee's talents, and POOF I was gone. And I am not the only one to suffer this fate prematurely. If you go to an attorney and he does not know what he is doing, I am sure you would rightfully point the finger at him. But wouldn't you also place responsibility where else it lies- like on the law schools that trained him? The Bar Examiners of individual states who formulate the questions to examine him? Aren't their minimum standards in the trucking industry that ALL companies follow with training and like issues? If they are, the haste in getting potential drivers with CDLs outweigh the need for ALL potential drivers to know exactly what they are doing.
    Likewise, if your child wants to excel in math or science or whatever the field, do you just tell them that they need to learn it all and function on their own? Do you not extend your hand to help them and take responsibility for their successes and/or failures? If you answer in the negative, then that is part of the apathy and ignorance with society and the failure of the United States to continue to compete with foreign countries.
    I for one am glad the Lord is taking me down the path that I follow. It is my firm intention to reopen a law office I once had open in Arkansas from 1998 to 2002. I am chomping at the bit for a prospective client to come into my office with an issue dealing with the attitude I am faced with regularly regarding trucking safety and training. When one person is killed, or significant property damage is incurred, I will without hesitation file a law suit because the training that driver received more than likely led to the occurrence. (By the way, trucking companies are legally obligated to insure their drivers for a reason.) As an employee of the company, and under the theory of vicarious liability and/or respondeat superior, the company will face the music for perpetuating this attitude. And it is the regular drivers who see this and also perpetuate the mentality. I also hope that drivers who read this are squirming, and desire to make a difference for themselves and the rest of the industry.
    Once the adverse happens, it will be too late then. Someone may already be dead. Let's change this mentality and correct these hasty training issues before I will have to look you in the eye and tell you, "I told you so!" More safety and training are desperately needed and it begins with the independent companies who rely on C1 and Drivers Solutions. Would not more training be helpful in securing the industry as well as making the roads safe for all??
    I am very vocal on this issue and I will give my dying breath to this cause. (If there are standards that I may have overlooked, please forward them to me.)
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  8. djtrype

    djtrype Heavy Load Member

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    Jan 3, 2009
    New Orleans
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    I should get paid for reading your posts.
     
  9. jezter5677

    jezter5677 Light Load Member

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    Jun 11, 2009
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    you and me both there dj
     
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  10. zebcohobo

    zebcohobo Vincent Van Gopher

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    Redbank,SC
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    Y'all do know that CDL schools, be it C-1, roadmaster, or local tech. school, only teach you what you need to know to get your license. Bare bones just enough to pass the test. You won't learn to drive(if ever) until you find a company and go out with a trainer. I can't believe the number of posts from recent grads complaining their school didn't teach them anything. If you have half a brain and a friend with a tractor and trailer, you can save 6k and study online for free then take your buddys rig to the DMV and there you go.

    Most of us don't have friends like that and the CDL mills know this. So, don't think you take classes for a few weeks and suddenly become a professional driver. This is the one industry where "on the job training" is for real.

    On a side note, Mr.fdlaw would do well to break his rants into paragraphs for easier reading. I mean dam.
     
  11. fdtlaw

    fdtlaw Bobtail Member

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    Jan 6, 2011
    Fayetteville, Arkansas
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    Too bad most truckers aren't as educated to understand my "rants", then maybe they could understand the severity of the problems a small sector of this industry faces, and for which I have eluded to.
     
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