Payment Expectations

Discussion in 'Questions From New Drivers' started by Mack37, Jan 2, 2018.

  1. Mack37

    Mack37 Bobtail Member

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    I'm doing a lot of research trying to decide if trucking is a career I want to get into and I need to know what kind of entry level jobs and pay I can expect my first few years and how quick it is to move up the pay ladder. I don't intend on staying in this business any longer than 10 years before I transition into training for the career I really want so the higher up stuff isn't really on the docket.

    Any info and advice would be much appreciated.
     
  2. rbrtwbstr

    rbrtwbstr Road Train Member

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    My first question to you is why? I'm not trying to talk you out of anything, and I'm not saying driving is bad (I happen to love it), but if it's not in your long term plans, then why? Believe it or not, if you're thinking driving is something you want to do 'for the experience' (we don't do this for the money, because there's no amount worth the effort), you'll likely never move on to your chosen career.

    But, to give you a general idea, if you go the cheap route, which is going to a big company,and having them train you, companies such as C.R. England (I don't recommend), you'll likely be away from home more than you like, and for $500 a week. You might make 40 -45 thousand the first year.

    If you have the funds to get your CDL through a community college, I'd go that route. That seems to be the better way. You'll still be starting at the bottom, but you won't be bound by a contract or loan from the company.

    As far as pay, it really varies from $40k to roughly $55k the first year, and it all depends on what you are hauling. Tanks and flatbeds are usually the better paying, but require some labor on the driver's part. Reefer and dry van usually pays a little less.
     
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  3. LeadFarmer

    LeadFarmer Light Load Member

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    You can look up averages. Don't believe recruiters and their "average driver makes" claims especially for a new driver.

    You have local jobs that pay $12-$35+/hr but most need 6-24mo experience and pay varies wildly based on location, whether you load/unload yourself, and then freight type. Most start OTR and after 6mo some stay, some look for local, and many/most quit trucking.

    OTR pay you multiply the miles a week average (research) times your pay per mile (.20-.50+) and you get your estimated average weekly gross. If you double check recruiter's numbers for the "average" driver you're getting above average mi/wk, making 80% of bonuses, with top experience pay/mi, and working 50+ weeks of the year.

    Which honestly makes sense because they probably only do the calculation for >1yr employees and most starter companies churn 85%+ of their new hires out of their business. OTR life isn't for most people.
     
  4. Chinatown

    Chinatown Road Train Member

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    Where is your location? Depending on the hiring area you live in, it's possible to start out at $60K or even a little higher.
     
  5. Mack37

    Mack37 Bobtail Member

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    I'm trying to find a career with an income to support my flight training. I love flying and operating heavy machinery so I think this might be the right fit for me. As long as I make $40/year I should have the income to support my training. Like I said I'm not looking to stick around long term, just something to help me leapfrog into what I want to do
     
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  6. Mack37

    Mack37 Bobtail Member

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    I'm in the dallas area. Certainly has to be big business around here with all of the developments popping up.
     
  7. aussiejosh

    aussiejosh Road Train Member

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    Getting a CDL can be expensive around $4000 - $6000 depending on the school and then flight training is a whole other level ain't it? your looking at around $50,000 or more unless you join the airforce and get trained for free.
     
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  8. Chinatown

    Chinatown Road Train Member

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    You can make well over $50K (probably over $60K)per year driving for Trimac Transportation (tankers) or Old Dominion Freight Lines (line haul division.)
    Both companies hire new cdl grads if you graduate from a cdl school on their approved list. After that, the terminal manager must approve you.
     
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  9. Mack37

    Mack37 Bobtail Member

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    I'd like to stay out of the military and honestly, securing a pilot slot in the air force at my age really isn't something to bet on.

    To be honest I already have $6k saved up and that's not bad considering I would pay that amount or more to go to school for something else. Given the potential pay vs investment I don't think it's too bad.

    And yeah, around $50k is what I need for training. Not many people realize flying is a poor man's career until you're older.
     
  10. Mack37

    Mack37 Bobtail Member

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    Really? $50 - $60 as a fresh cdl? Doing what? Everything I've read suggests I won't make any more than $40 starting out
     
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