Post flatbed load photos here V2.0

Discussion in 'Flatbed Trucking Forum' started by leftlanetruckin, Feb 18, 2014.

  1. Espressolane

    Espressolane Road Train Member

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    An opportunity to learn a new thing. Have never heard of this. Do you have a link to any regulations on this? Would like to know more about this requirement.
     
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  3. Nostalgic

    Nostalgic Medium Load Member

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    No bulkhead? Don’t forget to use a penalty strap
    August 24th, 2010
    If your flatbed trailers are not equipped with bulkheads, header boards, or any other type of front-end structure that prevents the cargo from sliding into the cab, did you know that you need to use an extra strap or chain to hold the cargo in place?

    Often referred to as a “penalty strap,” this extra tiedown helps secure the cargo to the deck and prevents it from sliding forward into the cab. The federal cargo securement rules in 49 CFR §393.110 require this extra tiedown if you’re not using a front-end structure to secure the cargo.

    You may be asking, “But aren’t bulkheads required?” The answer is no, there are no federal regulations saying that trailers need bulkheads or any other kind of front-end structure. Under 49 CFR §393.114, front-end structures have to meet certain standards ONLY if you actually use them to help secure your cargo (i.e., by placing cargo up against them to help prevent forward movement). If you place your cargo up against the bulkhead, refer to that section to make sure your bulkhead is up to spec.

    If your trailers don’t have bulkheads or you’re not placing your cargo up against them, then that extra strap or chain is required. The following table specifies the minimum number of tiedowns needed, based on cargo length, weight, and placement (and not taking into account the strength of the tiedowns):

    cargo.JPG
    As you can see, for anything over 5 feet or 1,100 pounds, an extra strap is required if the cargo is not placed against a bulkhead to prevent forward movement.

    Review your cargo securement practices and make sure your drivers are using the penalty strap when required. If they aren’t, they could be facing a costly “penalty” of their own — from roadside enforcement!

    Other factors

    Keep in mind that there are many factors affecting cargo securement — and many ways to secure cargo — in addition to the information presented above. Refer to the federal cargo securement rules in Part 393 for all the details. And remember that it never hurts to go beyond the minimum and err on the side of safety — use additional securement devices so the cargo remains secure even if one component of the system fails.
     
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  4. Espressolane

    Espressolane Road Train Member

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    Now I know what a penalty strap is. Never heard it called that. Really nothing new, that regulation has been in place for a long time.
     
  5. farmerjohn64

    farmerjohn64 Heavy Load Member

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    Owen, WI 54460
    United States

    It’s due there tomorrow, but between waiting hours for shipper and running out of time on my 14 hour window I’m not gonna be able to make it there in time
     
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  6. kylefitzy

    kylefitzy Road Train Member

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    Just a small correction, you can only skip the penalty strap if your load is against a headboard. Simply having a headboard on your trailer means nothing if the load is not against it.

    393.110 (b) When an article is not blocked or positioned to prevent movement in the forward direction by a headerboard, bulkhead, other cargo that is positioned to prevent movement, or other appropriate blocking devices, it must be secured by at least:

    (1) One tiedown for articles 5 feet (1.52 meters) or less in length, and 1,100 pounds (500 kg) or less in weight;

    (2) Two tiedowns if the article is:

    (i) 5 feet (1.52 meters) or less in length and more than 1,100 pounds (500 kg) in weight; or

    (ii) Longer than 5 feet (1.52 meters) but less than or equal to 10 feet (3.04 meters) in length, irrespective of the weight.

    (3) Two tiedowns if the article is longer than 10 feet (3.04 meters), and one additional tiedown for every 10 feet (3.04 meters) of article length, or fraction thereof, beyond the first 10 feet (3.04 meters) of length.

    (c) If an individual article is blocked, braced, or immobilized to prevent movement in the forward direction by a headerboard, bulkhead, other articles which are adequately secured or by an appropriate blocking or immobilization method, it must be secured by at least one tiedown for every 3.04 meters (10 feet) of article length, or fraction thereof.
     
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  7. F4T6UY

    F4T6UY Light Load Member

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    Here’s a noob question: Is there a “tear down” bulkhead? I see only solid one piece removable bulkheads, which makes structural sense, but was wondering if there was something you could carry that you could break apart the frame, with some kind of storable insert or something, that would help keep slippery wet lumber from sliding out? Or is there a convenient way to store a trailer bulkhead when you didn’t want to run with it on all the time?
     
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  8. F4T6UY

    F4T6UY Light Load Member

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    I guess, I was just wondering about those guys I see running 48’ trailers with bulkheads. They don’t have the option of longer loads and getting that 2’ of overhang if they need it.
     
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  9. Kyle G.

    Kyle G. Road Train Member

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    20200630_100710.jpg
    Technically, this counts as a bulk head. Problem is it's only a foot high, so it won't cover anything that's stacked
     
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  10. F4T6UY

    F4T6UY Light Load Member

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    Right, but I was thinking about that guy in another post, or maybe it was youtube, and he grabbed the brakes real quick (rolling slow) as he was about to miss the plant entrance, and all his interior lumber slid out into his headache rack. And then he went on about complaining about lumber and when it’s wet there’s not enough straps in the world to secure those inner pieces. Made me never want to haul lumber lol.
     
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  11. Kyle G.

    Kyle G. Road Train Member

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    I personally don't do lumber so I don't know about that, but it seems like maybe that's a good reason to not slam on your brakes.
     
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