Pre emission vs Emission engines

Discussion in 'Ask An Owner Operator' started by KullenTrucking, Apr 4, 2021.

  1. Long FLD

    Long FLD Road Train Member

    5,105
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    Mar 4, 2015
    Fairmont NE
    0
    If you’re buying a Detroit powered Freightliner or a Paccar powered Pete or KW one of the easiest things to do is get the VIN of the truck you’re interested in and go to a different dealer. Throw a hundred dollar bill to the service manager for his time and sit down and see what all has been done to the truck. If the work was performed at a dealer, which given the proprietary engine most of it should’ve been, it will be in the system, as well as any and all warranty claims on the truck. It’s a pretty simple step to see if you even want to go look at the truck in person and pay for an ECM dump and another inspection.

    My guess is the thread linked above was a problem truck but the buyer failed to do proper due diligence and now he’s in trouble. But since nobody can take personal responsibility for anything anymore or gets passed off as another “all emission trucks are bad” example instead of a “truck buyer should make sure, to the best of their ability, that they’re not buying junk” example.
     
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  3. roundhouse

    roundhouse Heavy Load Member

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    Jul 11, 2018
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    What kind of Maint does the emission system require beyond def fluid ?
    I’ve never owned one , have no clue.

    we do have a bobcat that demands a regen twice a day when you really need it to move some dirt and the #### thing just stops working until you do a regen.
    The new bobcat is a total POS, the old bobcat is much more reliable , it never stops in the middle of a busy job site requiring a half dozen workers to stand around for a half hour waiting on the #### thing to regen.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2021
    ChevyCam Thanks this.
  4. roundhouse

    roundhouse Heavy Load Member

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    Jul 11, 2018
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    Good ideas ,

    Most people just never realize how bad some emission trucks can be for the owner . I never thought about it.
     
  5. AModelCat

    AModelCat Road Train Member

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    Jul 7, 2015
    Canuckistan
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    The emission system is really several parts:

    EGR on the engine. This helps regulate NOx by lowering combustion temperatures in the cylinder. There are sensor that coke up/fail, venturi pipes that can get blocked, coolers that fail etc.

    DOC and DPF. These are downstream of the turbo. The DOC and DPF work together to reduce particulates. The DOC gets "dosed" with fuel in order to generate the temperatures the DPF needs to properly regen. These have temperature and pressure sensors that can become damaged or plugged up. Every so many hours the DPF needs to be removed for cleaning out the ash. The DOC catalyst breaks down over time too.

    The SCR is the catalyst that further reduces NOx. DEF is constantly sprayed into the exhaust stream and it reacts with the exhaust gases and the catalyst. There's a DEF injector that can fail, NOx sensors that can fail etc. The catalyst itself can become face-plugged from a damaged DEF injector. Even the DEF pump usually has a filter that requires replacement at specific intervals.

    Don't forget there's an engine ahead of these catalysts. If its not healthy the aftertreatment system can hide it pretty well. Burning oil and coolant can plug up the catalysts, as can over-fuelling.
     
    Long FLD Thanks this.
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